Why is HIPPA a big deal all of a sudden?

  1. Did something change? Why the big push on compliance?
    •  
  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   NurseGirlKaren
    Because the deadline for compliance is 4/14!!!
  4. by   deespoohbear
    It goes into effect April 14....

    Maybe that is why the big push all of a sudden....I don't know. I just know it is a PIA....
  5. by   nowplayingEDRN
    Besides the deadline and HIPPA being a PIA, it has been increasingly become a problem due to an increasing population with AIDS and other communicable diseases and other sensitive health care problems that can have a big impact on the lives of patients outside the hospital setting. As patient advocates we should be ever vigilant ob a regular basis to protecting the privacy of our patients. It should be like second nature but with an increase of nurses that are burning out and just don't care anymore it is starting to slip through the cracks...which is sad but it does happen. We had to do on line training on HIPPA for the Army....it was a pain but at the same time had lots of good info. But you know JACHCO (did I get it right....lol :chuckle ) ....they pick something every year that should be a no brainer and then make a federal issue of it....

    Christie
  6. by   dawngloves
    Oh! Is that why my hospital waited for the last minute to throw madatories at us?? LOL!!!
  7. by   MtnMan
    HIPAA is a byproduct of all the spending Bill's wife did during the co-presidency. I guess now that she is a senator we get part 1 of her plot to take over the world. Thank you residents of NY for allowing her to have a platform to speak from.
  8. by   Q.
    Originally posted by dawngloves
    Did something change? Why the big push on compliance?
    I was going to say, ask the Clintons.
  9. by   ceecel.dee
    Originally posted by UntamedSpirit
    It should be like second nature but with an increase of nurses that are burning out and just don't care anymore it is starting to slip through the cracks...which is sad but it does happen.

    Christie
    Wow! I wouldn't blame nurses for this!
  10. by   Q.
    I agree with ceecel.dee. This isn't about nurses talking in elevators or sharing information. This has to do with the sharing of information between healthcare clearinghouses (billers) and hospitals and researchers etc. It's just notifying the patient with whom the information is being shared with and why.

    In addition, the catalyst of HIPAA wasn't AIDS and other "sensitive" health issues. ALL health issues are sensitive. HIPAA is mainly about the portability and accessibility of health insurance between employers. A relatively small section is related to privacy.

    Keeping confidentiality regarding treatments, etc is still standard practice and nothing to do with HIPAA.
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Originally posted by UntamedSpirit
    Besides the deadline and HIPPA being a PIA, it has been increasingly become a problem due to an increasing population with AIDS and other communicable diseases and other sensitive health care problems that can have a big impact on the lives of patients outside the hospital setting. As patient advocates we should be ever vigilant ob a regular basis to protecting the privacy of our patients. It should be like second nature but with an increase of nurses that are burning out and just don't care anymore it is starting to slip through the cracks...which is sad but it does happen. We had to do on line training on HIPPA for the Army....it was a pain but at the same time had lots of good info. But you know JACHCO (did I get it right....lol :chuckle ) ....they pick something every year that should be a no brainer and then make a federal issue of it....

    Christie
    This post is so way off-mark it is not funny. Sorry, I don' t mean to insult you but I can' t let it get by. HIPPA, while a PITA to many of is not a narrow issue. It's not about AIDS or even nurses talking on elevators. HIPPA is not just a "nursing" issue, either, and it's not just a burn-out issue. Why not read up a bit on it and then see if this post is applicable?
  12. by   NRSKarenRN
    what is hipaa?

    the health insurance portability & accountability act of 1996 (august 21), public law 104-191, which amends the internal revenue service code of 1986. also known as the kennedy-kassebaum act.

    hipaa health insurance reform
    title i of the health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996 (hipaa) protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. visit this site to find out about pre-existing conditions and portability of health insurance coverage.

    hipaa administrative simplification
    the administrative simplification provisions of the health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996 (hipaa, title ii) require the department of health and human services to establish national standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers for providers, health plans, and employers. it also addresses the security and privacy of health data. adopting these standards will improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the nation's health care system by encouraging the widespread use of electronic data interchange in health care.
    hipaa administrative simplification </hipaa/hipaa2/default.asp>

    the bottom line: sweeping changes in most healthcare transaction and administrative information systems.

    who is affected? all healthcare organizations. this includes all health care providers, even 1-physician offices, health plans, employers, public health authorities, life insurers, clearinghouses, billing agencies, information systems vendors, service organizations, and universities.

    are there penalties? hipaa calls for severe civil and criminal penalties for noncompliance, including: -- fines up to $25k for multiple violations of the same standard in a calendar year -- fines up to $250k and/or imprisonment up to 10 years for knowing misuse of individually identifiable health information

    compiance deadlines? most entities have 24 months from the effective date of the final rules to achieve compliance. normally, the effective date is 60 days after a rule is published.

    the transactions rule was published on august 17, 2000. so the compliance date for that rule is october 16, 2002.
    the privacy rule was published on december 28, 2000, but due to a minor glitch didn't become effective until april 14, 2001. compliance is required for the privacy rule on april 14, 2003.
    the security rule was published on february 20, 2003. regulation effective date: april 21, 2003. compliance date: april 21, 2005 for most covered entities (april 21, 2006 for small health plans).

    history: how did we get hipaa?
    http://209.207.24.203/html/expertstory.cfm?did=9583

    administrative simplification under hipaa:
    national standards for transactions, security, and privacy
    updated march 3, 2003

    overview: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the health care system, the health insurance portability and accountability act (hipaa) of 1996 included a series of "administrative simplification" provisions that required the department of health and human services (hhs) to adopt national standards for electronic health care transactions. by ensuring consistency throughout the industry, these national standards will make it easier for health plans, doctors, hospitals and other health care providers to process claims and other transactions electronically. the law also requires the adoption of security and privacy standards in order to protect personal health information.

    hhs is issuing the following major regulations:
    electronic health care transactions (final rule issued);
    health information privacy (final rule issued);
    unique identifier for employers (final rule issued);
    security requirements (final rule issued);
    unique identifier for providers (proposed rule issued; final rule in development);
    unique identifier for health plans (proposed rule in development); and
    enforcement procedures (proposed rule in development).

    although the hipaa law also called for a unique health identifier for individuals, hhs and congress have indefinitely postponed any effort to develop such a standard.
    under hipaa, most health plans, health care clearinghouses and health care providers who engage in certain electronic transactions have two years from the time the final regulation takes effect to implement each set of final standards.

    more information about the hipaa standards is available here on hipaadvisory.com, hhs' administrative simplification web site <http://aspe.hhs.gov/admnsimp/>, and cms' hipaa web site <http://www.cms.gov/hipaa>.
    http://www.hipaadvisory.com/action/f...compliance.htm

    why a law was needed:
    concerns about the lack of attention to information privacy in the health care industry are not merely theoretical. in the absence of a national legal framework of health privacy protections, consumers are increasingly vulnerable to the exposure of their personal health information. disclosure of individually identifiable information can occur deliberately or accidentally and can occur within an organization or be the result of an external breach of security.
    examples of recent privacy breaches include:
    * a michigan-based health system accidentally posted the medical records of thousands of patients on the internet (the ann arbor news, february 10, 1999).
    * a utah-based pharmaceutical benefits management firm used patient data to solicit business for its owner, a drug store (kiplingers, february 2000).
    * an employee of the tampa, florida, health department took a computer disk containing the names of 4,000 people who had tested positive for hiv, the virus that causes aids (usa today, october 10, 1996).
    * the health insurance claims forms of thousands of patients blew out of a truck on its way to a recycling center in east hartford, connecticut (the hartford courant, may 14, 1999).
    * a patient in a boston-area hospital discovered that her medical record had been read by more than 200 of the hospital's employees (the boston globe, august 1, 2000).
    * a nevada woman who purchased a used computer discovered that the computer still contained the prescription records of the customers of the pharmacy that had previously owned the computer. the pharmacy data base included names, addresses, social security numbers, and a list of all the medicines the customers had purchased. (the new york times, april 4, 1997 and april 12, 1997).
    * a speculator bid $4000 for the patient records of a family practice in south carolina. among the businessman's uses of the purchased records was selling them back to the former patients. (new york times, august 14, 1991).
    * in 1993, the boston globe reported that johnson and johnson marketed a list of 5 million names and addresses of elderly incontinent women. (aclu legislative update, april 1998).
    * a few weeks after an orlando woman had her doctor perform some routine tests, she received a letter from a drug company promoting a treatment for her high cholesterol. (orlando sentinel, november 30, 1997).
    no matter how or why a disclosure of personal information is made, the harm to the individual is the same. in the face of industry evolution, the potential benefits of our changing health care system, and the real risks and occurrences of harm, protection of privacy must be built into the routine operations of our health care system.

    privacy breaches info from part 1 of law:
    http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/part1.html

close