Why Even go for your MA? Don't Understand... - page 4

please enlighten me as i don’t understand. i was talking with a medical assistant at a doctors office today. she stated that she went to school for 2 years to become a ma. she also stated that she... Read More

  1. by   skittlebear
    Quote from Fribblet
    Have you considered asking MA's this question? They will probably have more insight than people who did not go to school to be a MA.
    Yes, I only have met a few MA's in a doctors office and didn't want to ask them why they chose that route. I figured there would be plenty of MA's on this board. By the way, I highly respect MA's. They attend school just as long, if not longer than an LPN. The MA I was talking with stated that she had to have all the classes that are required for the RN program as well. I just don't think that it's fair that they have the same responsibilities and legnth of education and don't get compensated for their pay.

    Is there a spell check on here?
  2. by   skittlebear
    Quote from General E. Speaking, RN
    Wasn't meaning my comment to be snarky. Just took me back for a moment. I was trying to be humorous, didn't mean to offend.

    To all who were offended, my apologies.

    Thanks for clarifying. In that case, hahahaha
    Yes, it's hard to interpret dry humor through a message. I will admit I was a bit taken off guard by your comment, but I was also cranky, tired, and sick at the time. So, now...no offense taken. : )
  3. by   TheCommuter
    I completed a MA program more than 10 years ago, at the age of 19. Back then I was working as a cashier at a grocery store while earning a wage of $7.50 per hour. I felt that I would be stuck in the dead-end retail/grocery business if I didn't make a change and get some training for a new career pathway.

    However, nothing ever came of the training after I finished the MA program. I was not able to get hired without experience at most places, and the ones who were hiring made lowball offers such as $7.00 hourly, which was less than I had been earning in retail.

    I chose the MA route because I was younger, didn't do the research, and really didn't have much guidance about other options that were available to me. In addition, the MA seemed like a nice job with good hours, decent working conditions, and okay pay. By the way, I have never actually worked as a MA.
  4. by   rn865
    I work with an MA at an urgent care and she's always grumbling about how we do the same work (im an RN) but she gets paid less. She gets $16 while I get $22 and it's my first year at this first job and she's on her 3rd year. Well, I kinda understand how it's not fun for her to get compensated less but please don't punish me for having my BSN degree. I don't know much about MA education, but from what I had read, it might be better to at least just go for LVN or ADN if it's the same amount of time to get them.
  5. by   roser13
    Quote from skittlebear
    Yes, I only have met a few MA's in a doctors office and didn't want to ask them why they chose that route. I figured there would be plenty of MA's on this board. By the way, I highly respect MA's. They attend school just as long, if not longer than an LPN. The MA I was talking with stated that she had to have all the classes that are required for the RN program as well. I just don't think that it's fair that they have the same responsibilities and legnth of education and don't get compensated for their pay.

    Is there a spell check on here?
    Very common misconception that MA's take the "same classes" as nursing students. As has been mentioned twice before in this thread, the Anatomy/Physiology/Pharmacology courses are "lite" courses compared to a degreed nursing school. I understand why MA's feel underpaid when they truly believe that they have a similar education to a nurse. And it's no wonder they believe that when they see the ads for the MA schools, promising such a bright healthcare future.
  6. by   caliotter3
    Quote from mariem0034
    I work with an MA at an urgent care and she's always grumbling about how we do the same work (im an RN) but she gets paid less. She gets $16 while I get $22 and it's my first year at this first job and she's on her 3rd year. Well, I kinda understand how it's not fun for her to get compensated less but please don't punish me for having my BSN degree. I don't know much about MA education, but from what I had read, it might be better to at least just go for LVN or ADN if it's the same amount of time to get them.
    This person should be thankful that she is not getting $16 an hour for having a nursing license, like some nurses get. She can always get a nursing license and then seek better opportunities. Nobody is stopping her but her.
  7. by   jossjjojo
    MA's have their niche in doctor's offices and do a great job. The issue I have is relaying orders to hospital nurses. It's not allowed in many states yet it occurs. I have received several questionable orders from MA's, checked with the doc and they we're relayed incorrectly. I find this practice dangerous. Likewise I don't think they should be allowed to phone in scripts. Yes they go to school yes they may function as a nurse but alas they are not a nurse. Laws need to be tighter to protect patient's. Case in point...a pt had an order for 1mg of coumadin daily in addition to the 4 mg she was already taking. The MA called the script in as an additional 10 mg of coumadin QD, 3 days later an INR or 17.4 and major GI bleeding.
  8. by   ptbunny333
    Quote from jossjjojo
    MA's have their niche in doctor's offices and do a great job. The issue I have is relaying orders to hospital nurses. It's not allowed in many states yet it occurs. I have received several questionable orders from MA's, checked with the doc and they we're relayed incorrectly. I find this practice dangerous. Likewise I don't think they should be allowed to phone in scripts. Yes they go to school yes they may function as a nurse but alas they are not a nurse. Laws need to be tighter to protect patient's. Case in point...a pt had an order for 1mg of coumadin daily in addition to the 4 mg she was already taking. The MA called the script in as an additional 10 mg of coumadin QD, 3 days later an INR or 17.4 and major GI bleeding.
    I think the problem you are describing is not an MA one-its one of not being professional. Every MA should know the importance of meds, whether it is coumadin, HTN meds, insulin--heck, any med really. We were taught in school to check and recheck and even recheck again if we have to when dealing with orders. Hopefully the MA involved in the 17.4 INR () made a mistake. Everyone makes mistake, some bigger than others. Any health care professional, regardless of their level of education, should be aware of orders and the safety of their patients.
  9. by   OCNRN63
    Quote from Ptbunny
    I think the problem you are describing is not an MA one-its one of not being professional. Every MA should know the importance of meds, whether it is coumadin, HTN meds, insulin--heck, any med really. We were taught in school to check and recheck and even recheck again if we have to when dealing with orders. Hopefully the MA involved in the 17.4 INR () made a mistake. Everyone makes mistake, some bigger than others. Any health care professional, regardless of their level of education, should be aware of orders and the safety of their patients.
    MAs should not be relaying orders to nurses in a hospital. Orders need to come from the physician. Heaven knows we have enough issues with telephone orders from physicians, let alone taking orders from third parties who may or may not be relaying the information correctly.
  10. by   ptbunny333
    Quote from OCNRN63
    MAs should not be relaying orders to nurses in a hospital. Orders need to come from the physician. Heaven knows we have enough issues with telephone orders from physicians, let alone taking orders from third parties who may or may not be relaying the information correctly.
    Fair enough, I'll go with that. I think my point was that just because the person is an MA doesn't mean they don't know enough to relay a correct order if needed (I've done it before in a pinch) or phone in a script (we do it all the time). However, we are MAs for a reason, and that reason is to work within the realm of outpatient offices.
  11. by   jossjjojo
    Quote from Ptbunny
    Fair enough, I'll go with that. I think my point was that just because the person is an MA doesn't mean they don't know enough to relay a correct order if needed (I've done it before in a pinch) or phone in a script (we do it all the time). However, we are MAs for a reason, and that reason is to work within the realm of outpatient offices.
    Simply out of curiosity (really) does the doctor refer to you as his nurse? Do the patients think you are a nurse? I'm not judging, I'm just asking.

close