Why do RN's with ASN and BSN make the same? - page 8

In most other careers those with Bachelors make more then those with Associates, and I don't quite understand why it is different in nursing???? Can someone please clear this up, thanks :)... Read More

  1. by   gerry79
    Race, gender, degree, when will it ever end?????? We are our own worst enemy
  2. by   snowfreeze
    All ADNs and BSNs are not equal. We all graduate from simular programs; the BSN has more depth , the ADN has more skills so we can go out there and work.
    The biggest difference is the background before coming to nursing school.
  3. by   sleepless in norman
    IN SOME HOSPITALS BSN'S WILL RECEIVE 50 CENTS MORE AN HOUR, I'VE SEEN ADN'S IN MANAGEMENT POSITIONS, ONLY THEY CAN'T TEACH ON A COLLIGIATE LEVEL, BSN'S HAVE MORE NURSING THEORY CLASSES,ZO,CHEM,BIO, BUT AS FAR AS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IT'S ALL THE SAME.
  4. by   zenman
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Randy, I still don't think you can "smell em out" the way you profess to. I will never believe it's that simple.
    You don't have to believe me and like you say, it's not worth arguing over. Observing people is part of the training I taught with bodywork students. Many good bodyworkers will tell you what is wrong with you before they place their hands on you. I used to teach 60 or more students a year to "turn on" their senses in ways they did not think possible. Nurses who live in the country versus the concrete usually have better sensors also. Many nurses also have highly developed senses and can tell what's happening with a patient before it happens. Sense of smell...you need to meet my wife. When I used to take people out a lot for business lunches, she would get in my car later and say, "I see you took 3 women and a guy out to lunch." Alas, I could never have an affair "Is that candy I smell?"
  5. by   zenman
    Quote from nursbee04
    If I concentrate really hard, will you be able to guess what I'm thinking? My weight? My mother's maiden name? Just kidding. Really :chuckle

    Really, though- what exactly differentiates these nurses for you? What would make you look at me and think "she's a BSN/ADN/Diploma."

    Exactly how do you determine a nurse's educational level by watching their interaction with patients?

    I seriously cannot believe that you can tell 100% of the time.

    I posted the answer in an earlier post as did another person. It's not 100% of the time.
  6. by   zenman
    Quote from nursbee04
    If I concentrate really hard, will you be able to guess what I'm thinking? My weight? My mother's maiden name? Just kidding. Really :chuckle
    Your mother is one scary woman! :chuckle
  7. by   zenman
    Quote from gerry79
    Race, gender, degree, when will it ever end?????? We are our own worst enemy

    We are human nature at it's finest.
  8. by   actioncat
    Quote from tvccrn
    Our recruitment party was attended by people from the University of Texas Health Science Center hospital representatives looking for nurses to work in their many facilities. When asked why they didn't just use the graduates from their BSN program they said, "Because they don't have enough hands on patient experience to work on the floors. We hire them into the entry-level management postions we have open." I was there for this comment and can attest to that fact that it was indeed said by the person responsible for hiring. Says a lot about the difference in the direction of the courses.
    Huh? this just does not seem likely. I mean, do they really hire any new grads expecting that they are ready to go without any sort of precepting? I hardly beleive simply because some one got more "hands on" experience in school (and this is not really the case where I live) they are already competent nurses. I would think the differences in skill levels fade over time-- in at least a few months.
    I'm sorry, but where I work the ADN grads are no more/less clueless than the BSN grads. Also, the BSN grads are just as likely to have worked as techs.
    I have never seen a new nurse that is not struggling at times regardless of program they graduated from.
    What the heck is an "entry level" management postion anyway?
    Also, I would think that any academic hospital whether it has a nursing school affiliated or not would be searching for nurses from all nursing schools, not simply the one affiliated with it. There are probably more open positions than can be filled by the grads of one nursing school.
    As for more pay, I do receive more than the ADN nurses, but it is not much. I suppose it adds up over a long time. At first I felt a tiny bit guilty about it-- after all, I am doing the same work, but then again, I will not have to take advantage of tutition assistance for completing a BSN. That can add up too!
  9. by   Jay Levan
    Quote from cancergirl
    In most other careers those with Bachelors make more then those with Associates, and I don't quite understand why it is different in nursing???? Can someone please clear this up, thanks
    I believe I took the same Board exams (I am a Diploma R.N.) as the degreed candidates for licensure. I also believe My board exams would NOT be passed by the majority of the nurses graduating today. I have thirty two years experience, should I be paid less than a nurse with a degree?? Nursing is not about degrees, it's about taking very good care of people. Will you make it for thirty years? Only God knows the answer to that.
  10. by   Tweety
    Quote from actioncat
    I'm sorry, but where I work the ADN grads are no more/less clueless than the BSN grads. Also, the BSN grads are just as likely to have worked as techs.
    I have never seen a new nurse that is not struggling at times regardless of program they graduated from.

    I agree 100%. That's been my experience as well. Regardless of degree, of amount of clinical time, a new RN is a new RN and they both have the same precepting/orientation needs.
  11. by   tvccrn
    Quote from actioncat
    Huh? this just does not seem likely. I mean, do they really hire any new grads expecting that they are ready to go without any sort of precepting? I hardly beleive simply because some one got more "hands on" experience in school (and this is not really the case where I live) they are already competent nurses. I would think the differences in skill levels fade over time-- in at least a few months.
    I'm sorry, but where I work the ADN grads are no more/less clueless than the BSN grads. Also, the BSN grads are just as likely to have worked as techs.
    I have never seen a new nurse that is not struggling at times regardless of program they graduated from.
    What the heck is an "entry level" management postion anyway?
    Also, I would think that any academic hospital whether it has a nursing school affiliated or not would be searching for nurses from all nursing schools, not simply the one affiliated with it. There are probably more open positions than can be filled by the grads of one nursing school.
    As for more pay, I do receive more than the ADN nurses, but it is not much. I suppose it adds up over a long time. At first I felt a tiny bit guilty about it-- after all, I am doing the same work, but then again, I will not have to take advantage of tutition assistance for completing a BSN. That can add up too!
    I never said that I agreed with what was said. I only know that it WAS said. As for the entry level management positions, I am not aware of what they were as I am an ADN and was not looking for that so I didn't ask. That was 10 years ago and I was fresh out of school. If I were to hear that remark now, I would definitely ask.
  12. by   mac23
    I really think that people need to stop knocking the ADN programs that are available out there and the BSN'ers need to get down from their high horse and give AS/DN'ers the credit that's due them for the equally hard work they did to earn their license.



    I just have to say I don't think I'm on any high horse because I have my BSN. When thinking about careers I didn't really know what I wanted to do coming out of high school. I did know, however, that I wanted to go to a large university that had a football team and I wanted to stay in-state and I wanted to go to the same school as my best friend. I have NO regrets about my degree or my college experience nor should anyone who chooses the path that is right for them.

    I also don't know where the BSN's don't get enough clinical time came from. At least in my program our instructors would not just let us sit around and twiddle our thumbs. :angryfire We didn't have time. We did take 2 patients once we got to med/surg so we had plenty of patient care to do. There were some things we had to do in the presence of our instructor. So 8 students with 2 patients means the 1 instructor was responsible for 16 patients! Some nurses would not let us do certain things without our instructor being there so maybe some of the "sitting around" was simply waiting. Once we got to clinical, got report, reviewed the chart, saw our patient, did am care, assessed, meds, etc etc etc there was plenty for us to be doing. And yes at times I took the time to look-up procedures, new meds, a diagnosis that I was not familiar with.

    When I walk through the double doors at work I don't look at my co-workers and think about what kind of degree they have I can't say it's ever crossed my mind. And I agree with those that have said new grads from both programs need precepting. A lot of what you learn in nursing is on the job. (especially true in my area-NICU) I don't care how much clinical you had in school.
  13. by   Tweety
    Quote from mac23

    I just have to say I don't think I'm on any high horse because I have my BSN.

    Having a BSN is something to be proud of. Just because someone has the self-esteem to be pleased with their degree doesn't mean they are on a high horse.

    There are a relatively few that are arrogant about it, but I've only come across on BSN trained nurse that looked down on ADNs. So I can't say BSN nurses are on any kind of high horse, based on a couple of people.

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