Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 8

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    Quote
    ________________________________________________

    You would have to convince me a significant amount of sick patients are interested in how a nurse is educated or is interested in hearing that some BSN had to sacrafice both years and go into debt during this process. Patients are in and out so quickly today, there is limited nursing time to educate them with what they will need to know upon discharge.

    Patients and the public received their education watching area hospital nurses go on strike recently. Salaries and control over nurse/patient ratios were the focus of the strike and I was surprised to see that the patients, as well as the general public, had little sympathy for the nurses reasons to strike. The salaries were publish in the papers and the public felt nurses were receiving an adequate salary and should not go on strike. Actually, people wrote into the editorial that they were upset with the nurses since their elective procedures were cancelled due to the impending strike. What I took away from this recent experience was that patients and public are mainly concern with themselves and that they receive safe quality care and not interested in a nursing agenda. As the shortage of nurses continues to worsen, perhaps they will look at nurses differently?
    __________________________________________________


    I don't see why we would have to do a double-blind longitudinal study about how many patients are actually interested in our nursing pin, our alma mater, our certifications, etc in order to be "allowed" to display our credentials.

    I guess I am still confused about why you are so opposed to me listing Susan, RN, BSN with my nursing pin on my name badge. Am I compromising patient care by doing so? If not, then who cares???? And if you do care, why????
    Last edit by Susy K on Aug 15, '01
  2. by   mcl4
    [
    __________________________________________________


    I don't see why we would have to do a double-blind longitudinal study about how many patients are actually interested in our nursing pin, our alma mater, our certifications, etc in order to be "allowed" to display our credentials.

    If you read carefully, I wrote this messages stating this is what I took away from a recent experience and I think it could be very true in not only this area, but others. I never claimed this was a statistical study or whatever. Public interest or educating the public has been discuss at length with this thread and my response was directed toward a particular message and your message asking the "whys" was not the point.
  3. by   mcl4
    [

    I guess I am still confused about why you are so opposed to me listing Susan, RN, BSN with my nursing pin on my name badge. Am I compromising patient care by doing so? If not, then who cares???? And if you do care, why???? [/B][/QUOTE]

    Lets look at it this way. I've written numerous messages stating what I feel the purpose of a name badge is and why I feel job titles are an important distinguishable fact that needs to be on them. You tell me if the care will improve if you have the type of education listed on your name badge. It simply is two different opinions on what people feel should be the purpose of a name badge. If I look at a name badge, I needs to know who is the supervisor, who is the director of nurses and who are the staff RN, LPN and CNA. I don't need to know who has a BSN or ADN.
  4. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by kaknurse
    [B]Ok, lets see here, I NEVER implied that I was "better" than an RN who has an associates degree. mcl4, I see that you are an LPN? I respect LPNs although I do not work with any in my current position. The reason that I do not work for a hospital that pays a differential is that the hospital that I now work for does not pay a differential. My job switch was based on the fact of being a lot closer to home and $4 more an hour than what I was making at the hospital where I was previously employed.





    Yes, I am a LPN which I stated earlier, who is presently taking courses for my RN. LPNs do work in OB in this area.
  5. by   BrandyBSN
    Susy K, Please, if you ever move to Missouri, and work at my hospital, please list your educational experience. Please have a badge that displays Susan, RN BSN. Because if I was your patient, I would care, and I would want to know, and if you were taking care of my family, i would DEFINATLEY want to know how much education you have had, and where you went to school. It would make me feel more secure, as a patient or family, just to know what your background is. And ANYTHING on a badge that has a chance of making a patient or family member feel more secure might as well be there.

    Thanks
    BrandyBSN
    Last edit by BrandyBSN on Aug 15, '01
  6. by   KC CHICK
    When I pick up a patient in pre-op, they don't care if their nurse has an ADN instead of a BSN. That's not what matters to them. Rather, they are more concerned with making it through surgery and waking up in recovery.

    The hospital where I work lets nurses choose what they want on their name badges. Within the intraoperative depts. most badges simply show 'RN'. There is no difference in responsibility or in pay whatsoever.

    There is also no difference in R.E.S.P.E.C.T..
    Last edit by KC CHICK on Aug 16, '01
  7. by   mcl4
    I sacrificed things while in college because even though I was living with my parents, I still had to pay for things like gas, books, food, uniforms and my car. My parents paid my car insurance for me while I was in college and didn't charge rent. So I worked 3 to 4 days a week(8 hour shifts) in a restaurant near my home to afford those necessities.
    I stated in an earlier post that I had started out at a diploma based hospital school of nursing but flunked out. There were only 2 other colleges in my hometown area that offered nursing programs. One was a Catholic private university and the other a public state university. It was cheaper for me to go to the state school for 4 years than to go to the Private school for 2 years for an ADN. Since I had to pay for college myself, I chose to go to the 4 year program. At that time, I didn't know in what direction that I wanted to go with nursing, so I decided that I would be better off obtaining the BSN.
    And what does learning Spanish have to do with this topic?

    First I question if it was cheaper to attend the state univerisity vs. the private college since you would had been employed for two years longer collecting a salary? But that is not the point.

    I don't see what you've written as a sacrifice, but rather choices you made for something you wanted. You obviously wanted a BSN since there were more options in nursing you could chose to make throughout your career. A person who sacrifices many things is someone like my sister-in-law who is giving the best life possible for her autistic son. It isn't a life she would have choosen and wishes she had a healthy son. But this family will be making ongoing sacrifices with their time, finances and this will most likely be a life long committment for both the parents and perhaps the siblings. Going to family events can be difficult and many times they must leave early due to my nephew's behavior. They also had to sacrifice their dreams of what their son could have been.

    Spanish was an off topic sentence to your response listing your language you took in college. I'm sure, like many nurses today, we are finding that being able to speak Spanish an assest with the changing population. It isn't important point.
  8. by   Q.
    To some patients, knowing that you are a NURSE is enough for them.

    So by the logic listed in this thread, LPN and RN should also be removed from the name badges. It is a credential just as much as the BSN is. Badges should simply state "staff nurse" and that be that. LPN vs RN in most areas doesn't necessarily imply job role or function either. In some institutions/states, LPNs carry out the same bedside duties as an RN.

    Also, DON or Patient Care Manager is not a credential. Should these function heads have "RN" removed from their badges as well because RN no longer applies to their role??

    You're right, some patients don't care about the educational level of the nurse caring for them. And that is a tragedy. Some patients DO care, and that is promising. But again, I still do not see why some people have a problem with me having BSN on my name badge. Next thing you are going to tell me is that I cannot sign my name that way as well.

    This same logic also applies to ANY pins, breast cancer awareness, AIDS awareness, cutesy little nurse pins, whatever. All these do not function as security and ID on the name badge, so those should be eliminated as well.



  9. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by KC CHICK
    When I pick up a patient in pre-op, they don't care if their nurse has an ADN instead of a BSN. That's not what matters to them. Rather, they are more concerned with making it through surgery and waking up in recovery.

    The hospital where I work lets nurses choose what they want on their name badges. Within the intraoperative depts. most badges simply show 'RN'. There is no difference in responsibility or in pay whatsoever.

    There is also no difference in RESPECT.



    The above message has been my experience also while working at two different hospitals on a surgical and medical floor.
  10. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Susy K
    [B]To some patients, knowing that you are a NURSE is enough for them.

    So by the logic listed in this thread, LPN and RN should also be removed from the name badges. It is a credential just as much as the BSN is. Badges should simply state "staff nurse" and that be that. LPN vs RN in most areas doesn't necessarily imply job role or function either. In some institutions/states, LPNs carry out the same bedside duties as an RN.

    LPN and RN are not credentials, they are licenses mandated to be on a name badge by the State Board of Health. BSN, ADN or a credential are not.

    You are wrong if you do not see a difference in LPN/RN. There are two different job descriptions, RNs are in a supervisor role and we have two different type of licensures. Even in nursing homes, there are areas that differentiate a RN/LPN. If I need a narc. given IV for pain, I explain to my patient that a RN must do this and I will return with a RN to give this medication. I've talk to nurses that are LPNs outstate and they all say there are areas that they are unable to do with the type of licensure they have.



    The day the LPNs and RNs take the same state boards, I'll see your point.
  11. by   mcl4
    Also, DON or Patient Care Manager is not a credential. Should these function heads have "RN" removed from their badges as well because RN no longer applies to their role??


    I think you are arguing for the sake of arguing at this point if you don't see why a job title is important on a name badge. People need to know who is the staff RN/LPN/CNA as well as the DON and nurse managers. These roles and jobs are all different.
  12. by   mcl4
    You're right, some patients don't care about the educational level of the nurse caring for them. And that is a tragedy.




    Patients want excellent quality safe care and unless you can state a four year degree will ensure this, then what is your point.
  13. by   mcl4
    But again, I still do not see why some people have a problem with me having BSN on my name badge. Next thing you are going to tell me is that I cannot sign my name that way as well.




    Sign whatever title you want or put on your badge whatever you wish. I'm certainly not your boss. You really taking this topic way out there and the only thing is irritiating is I'm wasting my time answering these ridiculous messages.

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?