Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 5

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    Hey I am not saying that I am a "better" nurse because I chose to obtain a BSN. That was my decision. Sounds like you are looking to pick a fight here pal. But since I have a 4 year college degree then I should be compensated as such.

    Believe me I'm not looking for any type of fight. From what I read you are still in school? Is your web site wrong?

    I see I made a mistake and got two people who are posting mixed up. I see that Kaknurse is not a student nurse. My apology for the mistake.
  2. by   Ted
    This is a very interesting post.

    I understand both points of view regarding having the "all those letters" on the name tag.

    I say, if a healthcare professional wants them their name, so be it!! And if someone is content with just a few letters, again, so be it. Let it be a personal choice.

    To me, though, the most important thing is education. I would hope that we would all want to better ourselves through continued education . . . whether it's college, workshops, attending specialty conferences, patient care conferences (rounds) . . . whatever.

    With regards with nursing and educational degrees . . . I always felt that it was a strength for the nursing profession to allow a person to become licensed with a diploma, AS degree, BS degree, MS degree, etc. Usually, the person who started out with a diploma and decided to persue a AS, BS, and/or MS degree, has gained tons of experience with all of the "hands on care" he/she has provided while working. I believe that the "hands on care" is an extremely important part of a nurse's educational growth. To me, it is just plain cool that we can grow as healthcare professionals in such a manner!!! I ask this question: "Why can't other healthcare professionls learn and grow the same way???"

    The trick is to not stop learning and growing. I envey the nurses who started out with the diploma and worked their way towards their Masters. . . . with all of that "hands on care" as additional learning opportunities. (Although, I must say, I'm happy and proud of the with the way I've grown in this profession.)

    So . . . proudly wear those letters after your name. If you don't want lots of letters after you name, that's cool too. Just don't stop learning. . . especially in the healthcare field where there's always something new around the corner.

    Ted Fiebke

    P. S. Sorry for the "diarrhea of the keyboard" . . . it's a slow night at work (all three stable patients are safely and soundly sleeping with their cardiac monitors purring "normal sinus rhythm").

    Also, I can see that I need learning opportunities in spelling. Too bad this forum doesn't have a spell check. . . sorry for the errors.

    Ted
    Last edit by Ted on Aug 14, '01
  3. by   mcl4
    There are a lot of hospitals that pay a differential to those with BSN's. I think that a degree shows a higher committment. Wouldn't you agree that learning is a life-long process? If I were in the Army reserves, I would need a BSN to advance in the ranks. In fact I attended college with a diploma grad who needed her BSN in order to advance in rank or else the Army would make her "retire" early. This Nurse was an RN for 26 years before she went back to school.
    I think that I should be paid more for having a degree. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Generally, you find your greater pay increases with the number of years you invested in one facility and not what type of degree or education background you have. If you think you should be paid more for your degree, why don't you work at a hospital that does this?
  4. by   mcl4
    [
    To me, though, the most important thing is education. I would hope that we would all want to better ourselves through continued education . . . whether it's college, workshops, attending specialty conferences, patient care conferences (rounds) . . . whatever.

    With regards with nursing and educational degrees . . . I always felt that it was a strength for the nursing profession to allow a person to become licensed with a diploma, AS degree, BS degree, MS degree, etc. Usually, the person who started out with a diploma and decided to persue a AS, BS, and/or MS degree, has gained tons of experience with all of the "hands on care" he/she has provided while working. I believe that the "hands on care" is an extremely important part of a nurse's educational growth. To me, it is just plain cool that we can grow as healthcare professionals in such a manner!!! I ask this question: "Why can't other healthcare professionls learn and grow the same way???"

    The trick is to not stop learning and growing. I envey the nurses who started out with the diploma and worked their way towards their Masters. . . . with all of that "hands on care" as additional learning opportunities. (Although, I must say, I'm happy and proud of the with the way I've grown in this profession.)

    So . . . proudly wear those letters after your name. If you don't want lots of letters after you name, that's cool too. Just don't stop learning. . . especially in the healthcare field where there's always something new around the corner.

    Ted Fiebke

    I agree with your message. It has many good points about the importance of nurses to continue their education in many ways.
    I hope your night continues to be a quiet one.
  5. by   BrandyBSN
    HI all

    Yes, I am a student. I have 9 months left before I get my BSN. My Profile is correct.

    However, I have been a CNA for 4 years, and I have a lot of "outside" experience with nurses from All degrees and levels. I do not agree however, that just because I am a student, I should not have a strong opinion on this matter. I have been at this university for 3 years, 9 months shy of 4 years.

    This is not an argument about which nurse is better, and we should not try to put others down. Each chose their avenue of education for different reasons. This argument IS ABOUT recongition.

    I put in 4 years, i could have gotten my ADN in 2, but I decided to put another 2 years in, because I wanted a more advanced degree. I do not plan to be a bedside nurse for long, as I will be going on to get either my CRNA or go to med school. 4 years will make me a BSN, ONE test will make me an RN. 4 years has made me more educated, not a better nurse.

    Its also fine with me if a nurse wants ADN RN on her/his name badge. More power to them! Be proud of yourself, and if you want to show that you are an ADN, put it on your tag! I would not dream of discouraging you.
  6. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mcl4


    What is your point? Did this patient feel that if a nurse did not have a four year degree, she was inadequate? I've worked in hospitals and a nursing home and I've seen many associate and diploma nurses who I would choose as a supervisor/team leader over a nurse who had a degree in nursing. Organizational skills are more important today in nursing and this is where I see a nurse suceed or fail in handling a patient assignment and supervising others.
    First of all, you inserted a comment into my original post as if I wrote that - which I did not.

    My point was to state that the public is VERY unaware of the levels of education nurses have. I did not make any comments about who is better than whom.
  7. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K


    First of all, you inserted a comment into my original post as if I wrote that - which I did not.

    My point was to state that the public is VERY unaware of the levels of education nurses have. I did not make any comments about who is better than whom.

    I disagree. Patients are not overly interested or aware in what your education history is while you give them their care from what I've seen in different hosptial and nursing home settings. They recognize the difference between a RN/LPN/CNA and that is about the extent of it. Patients' priority is that their needs are meet and the care is safe.
  8. by   mcl4
    I put in 4 years, i could have gotten my ADN in 2, but I decided to put another 2 years in, because I wanted a more advanced degree. I do not plan to be a bedside nurse for long, as I will be going on to get either my CRNA or go to med school. 4 years will make me a BSN, ONE test will make me an RN. 4 years has made me more educated, not a better nurse.

    If you become a CRNA, you will have this on your name badge since this is a job title. Why didn't you attend med school if you feel you want to be a physician?

    Its also fine with me if a nurse wants ADN RN on her/his name badge. More power to them! Be proud of yourself, and if you want to show that you are an ADN, put it on your tag! I would not dream of discouraging you. [/B][/QUOTE]

    It isn't a matter of having pride or not having pride. The point is that as a staff nurse whether you have a diploma, ADN, or a BSN, your job title is the same. That was the point of the original message and mine. You badge is intended to show a person's name along with your job title. Showing your financial and time sacrafices in obtaining a four year degree is not the purpose of a badge.
  9. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mcl4



    I disagree. Patients are not overly interested or aware in what your education history is while you give them their care from what I've seen in different hosptial and nursing home settings. They recognize the difference between a RN/LPN/CNA and that is about the extent of it. Patients' priority is that their needs are meet and the care is safe.
    That is exactly what I stated. I said that patients are very UNAWARE of the educational levels of nurses. I don't see anything wrong with using my credentials to educate the public about the various educational backgrounds of their caregivers.
  10. by   BrandyBSN
    I didnt go to med school because the tuition is 24,000 a year, and straight out of high school I couldnt swing that, since I completely support myself on loans and scholarships, with no assistance from my parents. My goal was to be a nurse first, because in my experience, the best doctors are often those who were nurses first. And, I can work at a hospital that offers tuition reimbursment. It might take me more time, but its worth it to me in the long run.

    To me, it IS a matter of pride. Everyone should be proud of the accomplishments they have made. What about jobs where "20 years of dedicated service" is printed on their badges? Not just nursing, other types of employees have that too. Should it not matter what time they have put in to their profession? Its not just about a statement of "job title". Its about pride and recognition of service and accomplishment.
  11. by   Q.
    And...back to the point of discussion:

    The original question was why should nurses be allowed to wear credentials on their badges? I guess I fail to see a solid argument in which doing so hinders patient care, or interferes with safe practice.

    Someone mentioned that name badges are meant to be used for ID and security reasons only; my name badge does that as well as serves the only place where I can proudly display my education. If I had an office, I would be hanging my diploma and my license on the walls.

    At the one facility where I am allowed to have RN, BSN after my name, I've had only good interactions and educational opportunities with patients who have asked me what a BSN is, how many years of schooling, etc, etc. Like I've said, I've had some patients who thought ALL NURSES had to have a 4 year degree. I've had patients whose daughters/sisters were interested in nursing school and were undecided about which program to go into, and asked me why I chose the BSN route. And I've had some patients who were fully aware of the various levels of nursing and commented on how they thought all BSNs were removed from the bedside. So you see, displaying my BSN only proved to help educate the public about the nursing profession and helped to dispell some myths.

    Until someone can present an argument to me about how displaying your credentials is detrimental to patient care, I am all for wearing your BSN or MSN with pride. There is nothing wrong with it and we should be allowed to without criticism from our own kind.
  12. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by Susy K


    That is exactly what I stated. I said that patients are very UNAWARE of the educational levels of nurses. I don't see anything wrong with using my credentials to educate the public about the various educational backgrounds of their caregivers.
    I also stated in my the previous message that patients are not overly interested. Most patients are ill and more interested in what is going on with them and how a nurse can help them get well. If you think a ill person wants to know the educational process of becoming a nurse, I would question this. Patients want to have their pain taken away, reassurance, educating them about their disease process or illness and to have this done by a qualified nurse. I could see telling someone outside a hospital setting the different ways a person becomes a RN, but in the hospital, we are there to educate the patient with what is going on with them and not us.
  13. by   Q.
    Originally posted by mcl4


    I also stated in my the previous message that patients are not overly interested. Most patients are ill and more interested in what is going on with them and how a nurse can help them get well. If you think a ill person wants to know the educational process of becoming a nurse, I would question this. Patients want to have their pain taken away, reassurance, educating them about their disease process or illness and to have this done by a qualified nurse. I could see telling someone outside a hospital setting the different ways a person becomes a RN, but in the hospital, we are there to educate the patient with what is going on with them and not us.
    This goes without saying. I am not trying to be picky here, but obviously I am not going to sit there and rattle off the history of the suppressed nursing profession while my patient is in the process of getting an epidural placed, or while we are prepping her for an emergency C-section.

    Patients DO have needs while in the hospital, and most of them pertain to direct bedside care. But in my opinion, I treat my patients wholistically, and that includes interacting with them on a friendly basis and enjoying conversation other than their disease process. Distraction is also a widely used pain relief measure.

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?