Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 4

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   prmenrs
    Thanks, nurs4kids, Ippreciate that.
  2. by   prmenrs
    Thanks, nurs4kids, I appreciate that.

    I think several of us are saying the same things. Whatever you earned and wish to have on your ID should BE there. If your hospital doesn't do that, I don't know what you can do. Maybe a petition to the DON? (not to be confused with the Godfather movie!!! )
  3. by   mcl4
    I have to agree with susy k's comment...WHY SHOULD NURSES NOT WEAR THEIR CREDENTIALS ON THEIR BADGES?? [/B][/QUOTE]

    Name badges are meant to show the names of personel and distinguish job titles and licensure and not your education history in my opinion. Name badges are also use for security by showing you are a staff member of an institution and/or a particular department.
  4. by   Jason-ACNP
    Posted by mcl4 "job descriptions and responsibilities between a staff RN who has received their education through a two, three or four year nursing program are the same. In the twenty years as an LPN, I've yet to be able to see the difference in nursing care based on education. I see no reason why a nurse would require more the RN on their name badge"

    Really? Do you mean to imply that my statement regarding the U.S. military is a farce? It isn't true that the greatest military strength in the free world recognizes the distinct differences between the education of a baccalaureate degree nurse versus other registered nurses? Indeed a travesty on my part. My apologies for the error. Yet, I am unable to comprehend why it is that graduate programs don't allow ALL registered nurses regardless of their education to pursue a higher education? I'm at a loss... Wait... could it be...ahh...yes... of course... there actually are differences in their education! That's it! Whew!!! I was at a loss (momentarily)J

    You are right however. Few healthcare institutions could care less what credentials an RN has behind her or his name unless they are advanced practice nurses. Why?

    Because nursing is inundated with those whose education is primarily limited to a diploma or associate degree. To hospital administrators (in the vast majority of hospitals, but not necessarily YOUR hospital), YOU are nothing more than a warm body dutifully executing your tasks. Does that mean that these nurses are inferior? Of course not. To the contrary in most cases. Yet, for the aforementioned reason, mainstream nursing will simply not gain the respect it deserves. Unfortunate? Yes. Unfair? Of course. Yet, due to the "vocational" education of most nurses, the GENERAL PUBLIC (vs. the many families of patients whose lives you saved) DOES view mainstream bedside nursing as a laborious, thankless "job" (vs. career) that primarily entails passing out bed pans, giving bed baths, hand feeding patients, etc. In essence, nurses are often viewed as "mindless" recorders of blood pressures and I&Os.

    You can argue this point until you are cyanotic and give 1 billion examples of how you can prove me wrong, but it simply doesn't matter because this is one time that I am right (which is rare). I worked in 14 states as a traveling nurse. The perception of nursing is a UNIVERSAL VIEW!

    YES!!!! This is unfortunate!!!! YES!!!! This is a disgrace!!! And NO, it DOES NOT MEAN THAT BSN nurses are better prepared to carry out nursing duties!! In fact there may be some truth that BSNs are inferior to task oriented bedside nurses because many of these students spent time in classes preparing them for research at the graduate level (and yes, research is important whether you know how to truly utilize it or not) as well as advanced health assessment classes. I'll be the first to admit that it took me several weeks to master "bed-making" skills in the ICU because we simply were not trained to do so. There are numerous technical skills that RNs and LPNs with lesser education can do better than me. Yet, I'm not so modest to refrain from exclaiming that I a damn good ANP who has excellent critical thinking skills and can perform advanced "technical skills" (i.e. central line placement, chest tube placement, suturing, etc) allowed within my scope of practice. We ALL bring different skills at different levels to the playing field.

    This brings me to my final point. There is one thing that nurses can do to save face, regardless of their education. They can learn to respect themselves and each other and appreciate the different background that each comes from. The internal dissension within nursing in part has led to its dismal demise. While we should all have a common goal, nursing is divided by jealously and insecurity. Who gives a damn what an RN puts behind his or her name? Does it make you any less of a nurse because you don't have certain credentials? Does it make you any better of a nurse if you do? Your integrity (or lack thereof) and the attitude you exude to your patients and colleagues speaks volumes (and certainly more than initials.) The flip side to that is that no one should ever apologize for displaying credentials because she or he chose to pursue a higher education. Anyone who feels that they owe a reason for displaying their education is lacking a backbone.

    Support one another. Encourage one another. Teach one another. But for the love of God, quit going at each other's throats...it is embarrassing. The irony is that while nursing is about healing and saving lives, there are so many nurses who could suck the life out of a gnat. What a waste of energy and talent.

    Jason-MNSc, ACNP (Uh-oh.... I displayed my credentials....Geesshhh...the nerve of me... it must be the grandiosity that dwells within)
  5. by   mcl4
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by Jason-ACNP
    [B]Posted by mcl4 "job descriptions and responsibilities between a staff RN who has received their education through a two, three or four year nursing program are the same. In the twenty years as an LPN, I've yet to be able to see the difference in nursing care based on education. I see no reason why a nurse would require more the RN on their name badge"

    Really? Do you mean to imply that my statement regarding the U.S. military is a farce? It isn't true that the greatest military strength in the free world recognizes the distinct differences between the education of a baccalaureate degree nurse versus other registered nurses? Indeed a travesty on my part. My apologies for the error. Yet, I am unable to comprehend why it is that graduate programs don't allow ALL registered nurses regardless of their education to pursue a higher education? I'm at a loss... Wait... could it be...ahh...yes... of course... there actually are differences in their education! That's it! Whew!!! I was at a loss (momentarily)J

    Your are missing the point. There is a difference in education, but a staff RN has the same responsiblities, job description or duties that are required of him/her. Where on earth did you read I said the military was a farce. What I did say is you can not compare how education will affect how a person is looked upon in the military vs. a staff nurse.


    You are right however. Few healthcare institutions could care less what credentials an RN has behind her or his name unless they are advanced practice nurses. Why?

    Because they perform the same job. The last I heard, there is a fifty cent increase in pay per hour for a BSN.

    Because nursing is inundated with those whose education is primarily limited to a diploma or associate degree. To hospital administrators (in the vast majority of hospitals, but not necessarily YOUR hospital), YOU are nothing more than a warm body dutifully executing your tasks. Does that mean that these nurses are inferior? Of course not. To the contrary in most cases. Yet, for the aforementioned reason, mainstream nursing will simply not gain the respect it deserves. Unfortunate? Yes. Unfair? Of course. Yet, due to the "vocational" education of most nurses, the GENERAL PUBLIC (vs. the many families of patients whose lives you saved) DOES view mainstream bedside nursing as a laborious, thankless "job" (vs. career) that primarily entails passing out bed pans, giving bed baths, hand feeding patients, etc. In essence, nurses are often viewed as "mindless" recorders of blood pressures and I&Os.


    I disagree. I believe the public is knowledgeable on the increase skills and responsiblites a nurse has today. I don't see them thinking of us as mindless.
  6. by   RNforLongTime
    50 cents/hr differential for having a BSN? I have worked at 2 different hospitals in my 4 year career and neither place has offered a degree differential!
  7. by   mcl4
    This brings me to my final point. There is one thing that nurses can do to save face, regardless of their education. They can learn to respect themselves and each other and appreciate the different background that each comes from. The internal dissension within nursing in part has led to its dismal demise. While we should all have a common goal, nursing is divided by jealously and insecurity.

    Jealousy and insecurity is not something I've seen in the recent years of nursing. If anything, we've pulled more together with the shortage of nurses. Where I work, we perform as a team and help each other in order to make it through a shift these days.


    Who gives a damn what an RN puts behind his or her name? Does it make you any less of a nurse because you don't have certain credentials? Does it make you any better of a nurse if you do? Your integrity (or lack thereof) and the attitude you exude to your patients and colleagues speaks volumes (and certainly more than initials.) The flip side to that is that no one should ever apologize for displaying credentials because she or he chose to pursue a higher education. Anyone who feels that they owe a reason for displaying their education is lacking a backbone.

    Support one another. Encourage one another. Teach one another. But for the love of God, quit going at each other's throats...it is embarrassing. The irony is that while nursing is about healing and saving lives, there are so many nurses who could suck the life out of a gnat. What a waste of energy and talent.

    Who says we don't support one another. It is a message board and the topic is being debated. That is it and nothing more.
    These discussion don't come up in real life at work. The rare exception was last night at work looking at our state board nursing letter and noting the lower scores from nurses who graduated with a BSN from private colleges and state universities. The only comment that came from us was that we were surprised. I believe a potential student should look at these results before applying to a nursing program no matter what type of diploma/degree they are looking at.
  8. by   BrandyBSN
    Degree Diff is $1.50 an hour here for a BSN. Its not just nurses that shoudl have their degree on the badges, its Docs too! We have a lot of DOs here, and a couple MDs, and they have their degree after their name. and believe me, i have had MANY patients inquire about what my educational history is, and what I have done in school besides nursing.

    Thank God my hospital puts the degrees on the badges, so I would never have to worry about this. Its important to me! personally, if I was sick, and the many times I have been to the hospital as a patient, i DO care what degree my nurse has. Not because the BSN is necessarily a better nurse, but because I want to know what type of commitment my nurse has put into her education.
    Last edit by BrandyBSN on Aug 14, '01
  9. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    50 cents/hr differential for having a BSN? I have worked at 2 different hospitals in my 4 year career and neither place has offered a degree differential!
    Do you believe you should be paid more then an ADN? You did list that you went into debt and invested a significant amount of time to obtain your BSN. Do you plan to utilize your degree beyond being a staff nurse or perhaps you have already done this? Do you think there is a difference in how a staff RN delivers care based on education?
  10. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by BrandyBSN
    Degree Diff is $1.50 an hour here for a BSN. Its not just nurses that shoudl have their degree on the badges, its Docs too! We have a lot of DOs here, and a couple MDs, and they have their degree after their name. and believe me, i have had MANY patients inquire about what my educational history is, and what I have done in school besides nursing.


    Physicians in this area do not have their degree listed on the name tag and neither do nurses. It is uncommon to see patients ask what a nurse's education is and again having a BSN does not ensure safe patient care. Many times patients do not know the difference between the LPN/RN since many of our duties are the same and think of us all as just nurses. We must all follow hospital policies and procedures to ensure that the patient receives the best care and this is an inner responsiblity that RNs/LPNS/CNAs must have. It isn't something you learn from a book. What is more important is that nurses continue to keep learning through new experiences, other staff, and continuing eduation courses.

    Thank God my hospital puts the degrees on the badges, so I would never have to worry about this. Its important to me! personally, if I was sick, and the many times I have been to the hospital as a patient, i DO care what degree my nurse has. Not because the BSN is necessarily a better nurse, but because I want to know what type of commitment my nurse has put into her education.
    What type of commitment to education does a BSN have in comparison to an ADN. Commitment to giving the best patient care is the most important aspect to nursing and it isn't contingent on what degree you've obtained. The tone written in your messages leaves me to believe you feel you are a better nurse since you have a BSN??
  11. by   RNforLongTime
    Hey I am not saying that I am a "better" nurse because I chose to obtain a BSN. That was my decision. Sounds like you are looking to pick a fight here pal. But since I have a 4 year college degree then I should be compensated as such. I took many different classes at college, french, history, music, etc. Plus I think that a BSN gets more in depth into management and stuff like that. I chose to go the BSN route at my state university because it was cheaper than going 2 years at a local private Catholic University!
    I have no intention of going into a management position. It was recommended to me by another RN that she thought that I would be better off getting a BSN because there would be more opportunities for me. And I agree.
    But since I EARNED my BSN then I should be allowed to wear the credential on my name badge and that is the point of this thread in the first place. I am not looking to divide us based on whether a person has a diploma or ADN or BSN. We all took the SAME licensing exam --the NCLEX RN. And our practice is the same. I do not think that I am better than anyone else and never said that I was and never would.
    There are a lot of hospitals that pay a differential to those with BSN's. I think that a degree shows a higher committment. Wouldn't you agree that learning is a life-long process? If I were in the Army reserves, I would need a BSN to advance in the ranks. In fact I attended college with a diploma grad who needed her BSN in order to advance in rank or else the Army would make her "retire" early. This Nurse was an RN for 26 years before she went back to school.
    I think that I should be paid more for having a degree.
    Last edit by RNforLongTime on Aug 14, '01
  12. by   mcl4
    [

    Thank God my hospital puts the degrees on the badges, so I would never have to worry about this. Its important to me! personally, if I was sick, and the many times I have been to the hospital as a patient, i DO care what degree my nurse has. Not because the BSN is necessarily a better nurse, but because I want to know what type of commitment my nurse has put into her education. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Looking at your profile, you are still in nursing school. The least of my concerns would be what is on my name badge and I would be more in tune to passing the remaining courses as well as state boards. Why not wait until you get out on the floors or whatever department you decide to work in before you start judging others based on their education. You'll find some terrific RNs, LPNs, and CNAs that will help you adjust to your new position. You'll be dependent on them in many ways and you may find yourself being orientated by ADN. If you are smart you will look to find a ADN. diploma or BSN who have been in the profession for years, and try to learn from their experience.
  13. by   mcl4
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    Hey I am not saying that I am a "better" nurse because I chose to obtain a BSN. That was my decision. Sounds like you are looking to pick a fight here pal. But since I have a 4 year college degree then I should be compensated as such.

    Believe me I'm not looking for any type of fight. From what I read you are still in school? Is your web site wrong?


    I took many different classes at college, french, history, music, etc. Plus I think that a BSN gets more in depth into management and stuff like that. I chose to go the BSN route at my state university because it was cheaper than going 2 years at a local private Catholic University!
    But since I EARNED my BSN then I should be allowed to wear the credential on my name badge and that is the point of this thread in the first place. I am not looking to divide us based on whether a person has a diploma or ADN or BSN. We all took the SAME licensing exam --the NCLEX RN. And our practice is the same. I do not think that I am better than anyone else and never said that I was and never would.
    And neither did Brandy.
    Most of my supervisors are ADN and they are terrific. My old roommate before I married has a BSN from a private college and she is a great nurse also. I just haven't though of their education as being the deciding factor in why they are great nurses.
    Honestly, Spanish today would have been a better college course since this is a language that is becoming more in need of being translated. In fact, our facility is offering Spanish courses to help us nurses communicate better with patients who speak only Spanish.

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?