Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges? - page 18

I have never had anyone give me a straight answear to this question, Why do nurses wear there degree on the badge uniforms? I see few other people in the hospital setting that do it except for... Read More

  1. by   peachysweet
    I am a currently enrolled in a BSN nursing program. I feel that it is important for a nurse to display his/her education. I agree that many people do not understand the level of education any nurse has reguardless of their degree. This was brought up in my professional nursing course. Many people believe nurses are semi-educated comfort promoters. (My boyfriend included.) I have asked many people about what it takes to be a nurse, and unless they have a nurse in the family, or they know a nurse personally, they think it is an honorable profession emotionally not intellectually.
  2. by   surgorthonurse
    Where I work it is either cna, lpn or rn..
    Believe me the bsns and msns here have an ego problem well 70% of them..
    My feelings it doesn't matter bsn or msn, lpn, or cna we all are here for the same reason the patient.
    My philosophy no matter if you wash the dishes or pass the meds everyone is important, from the CEO to the housekeepers. treat others like you want to be treated.. Kindness goes along way..
  3. by   LaVorneRN
    As a proud graduate of a school of nursing from a university(did I cover all bases?) I have my ADN. While I am proud of the 6 years it took me to get it(working full time and starting from prereqs 1 at a time) I don't care to wear the letters on my badge because I took the same test that requires me to practice nursing as a BSN graduate takes and to a patient they don't really care. I was a patient for over 3 months alongside my husband and not once did it occur to me to ask or was it voluteered what degree one caring for us held. They all knew I was preparing for my boards and was a new grad and gave all kinds of advice and study materials. Most of them gave great care.
    It is naive to think there is not an element of "I'm better than you" between BSN's and ADN's. I have seen it and experienced it. It doesn't mean all nurses with BSN's think like this-some of my best friends have BSN's!!!! But I am proud of the fact that (yes, this statistic is true via the nursing board of AK) ADN's pass the boards at a higher rate than BSN's. It doesn't matter what the letters are behind your name as long as they say RN and you are capable of doing your job. Peace and blessings.
  4. by   fergus51
    If only certain BSNs are snobby about it, then why not just deal with them as individuals? It seems like the attitude is what matters, not the name tag. If I am a perfectly nice, not coneited person, would you really care that it says BSN on my nametag? If not, I don't see a problem.

    I have had all types of nurses seem arrogant about their education being the best (ADNs get more clinical time, BSNs have a "real" degree, LPNs do all the "real work", etc). I don't see why it matters what their nametag says.
  5. by   LaVorneRN
    I have a friend who states he is a behaviorist-that is he doesn't deal with people based on their race, vocational or educational status, financial status etc. He deals with them based on their behavior. I choose to follow that premise.I don't care what's on a person's name tag. If you worked hard for it by all means do what you feel moves you. There are those who think as you elevate your education it elevates you as a person. Those are the people I have a problem with. Those who think these letters make them better than others. This has been a topic of face to face discussions between me and other nurses (with ADN's, BSN's, ANP, and PhD's) who actually agree due to experiences. I don't speak for everyone. I speak for myself and based on my personal experience. There is no better degree as far as I'm concerned. It depends on where you are in life, what you want and where you want to go in your career.
  6. by   angiebaby
    I don't see anything wrong with having RN or RN, BSN or RN,MSN after your name, We should be proud of the level of education that we have achieved. Also, in an emergency those 2 little letters let people know what you a legally able to do to help.
  7. by   mattsmom81
    I wear RN on my name badge. I used to wear LPN just as proudly. I don't insist on wearing the CCRN. Now my coworkers know I have it and most of us have attained this... for our own personal satisfaction.

    Since I did not attain that credential for anyone other than myself, in my mind I have no need to advertise it. My behavior speaks to my competence and I don't need to get into tiffs re 'who's a better nurse...who's a better person'. It's such an old tired debate.....

    Now I WILL list it in a job app, as it is valued by employers, but again I did not do this for the employer. They give me an extra buck for it...whoo hoo.

    Unfortunately I've found the wearing of advanced credentials leads to 'I'm better than you' wars, in real life (just as on this BB.) I try real hard not to feed into them. Life's tough enough..LOL!

    Angibaby, I hope you don't think any MSN could handle an emergency better than a nurse with solid ER experience...because if I could choose who would handle MY emergency, it would be an experienced ER nurse.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Apr 14, '03
  8. by   liberalrn
    Couldn't read thru all the posts, this is an active thread! Here's my take: I think the badges should stipulate LPN, CNA, RN, Supervisor, whatever the position is. Frankly the massive alphabet soup out there confuses me, can't imagine that the pts are better informed or really care. "Registered" used to be important (and still is) because for a long time in our hx, anyone could call themselves a nurse (midwives had the same trouble), So the stipulation of Registered was crucial. Seems we haven't come very far from that!
    I knew of a nurse who had BSN,RN,CCRN, and God knows what else on her badge--lol asked her why if she had so much learning was she still emptying the bedpans! True story, intended to be humorous........
  9. by   Belmont_Murse
    Quote from prmenrs
    I don't think it's an ego thing, rather a pride thing.
    Aren't pride and ego very similar? Pride feeds your ego...

    Anyways, putting your credentials onto a badge shows your professionally recognized training and the certifications you have earned. Differing backgrounds in a workplace ideally yield better results for a patient as there is a shared knowledge base. BSN's bring a different perspective than ADN's. Neither is necessarily "better" but they are "distinctive. One who is qualified to be something should have proof and display it when providing patient care. We work in health care facilites where everyone looks quite similar to outsiders/patients who may have dec. LOC. Showing who we are allows us to deliver care that is trusted by the end recipient. At a minimum, it should say "RN".
  10. by   hotflashion
    I agree with what liberalrn said back in 2003: "badges should stipulate LPN, CNA, RN, Supervisor, whatever the position is....the massive alphabet soup out there confuses me..."

    The abbreviations mean nothing to patients: Nothing, nada, zip. They also do not understand CNA or PCT or whatever abbreviation fits your institution's job title for that position.

    One hospital where I did a clinical started issuing nurses badges without last names. I think it would help more if nurses were accountable to their patients by being identifiable by FIRST AND LAST names. As nurses we know quite a lot about our patients. I think they deserve to at least know our names.
  11. by   NeoNurseTX
    Our first names are LARGE on our badges...however the docs don't have theirs like that. Hmm. I have my degrees/certifications related to nursing only on mine.
  12. by   GilaRRT
    Quote from Belmont_Murse
    Aren't pride and ego very similar? Pride feeds your ego...

    Anyways, putting your credentials onto a badge shows your professionally recognized training and the certifications you have earned. Differing backgrounds in a workplace ideally yield better results for a patient as there is a shared knowledge base. BSN's bring a different perspective than ADN's. Neither is necessarily "better" but they are "distinctive. One who is qualified to be something should have proof and display it when providing patient care. We work in health care facilites where everyone looks quite similar to outsiders/patients who may have dec. LOC. Showing who we are allows us to deliver care that is trusted by the end recipient. At a minimum, it should say "RN".
    Thread of the living dead. I hope you realise you are replying to a thread that was last active about seven years ago?
  13. by   BabyLady
    In the military, why do the different ranks wear ribbons and stripes on their uniform?

    Because they have EARNED them.

    Thus, the same rationale in the hospital....if you earned the degree, then you have the right to show the public, and coworkers, what you worked hard to earn.

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Why do Nurse's wear there degree on there name badges?