Why Do I Care? - page 8

Why do I care that new nurses leave our unit after less than two years -- often after less than one year? Why do I care, when they're adults. They're going to have to live with the consequences of... Read More

  1. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    8
    Quote from pookyp
    Being a senior nurse makes you an expert nurse? Serious question.
    Being a senior nurse means you've at least had the time to become an expert. Some take better advantage of the opportunity than others.
  2. Visit  07302003 profile page
    3
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.)
    But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out...
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    OCNRN63, Ruby Vee, and Fiona59 like this.
  3. Visit  kungpoopanda profile page
    2
    Quote from LadyFree28
    It is the fact they want money WITHOUT the work; everybody knows that we are NOT in this business for free.
    I'm not aware of it being a "fact" that "they" want money without work. What a generalization! Where is your evidence?
    wannabecnl and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  4. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    2
    Quote from 07302003
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.)
    But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out...
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    Thank you! The newbies often want to judge us for not helping them enough or for "not being very nice to me, but nobody is too busy to be polite!". But they don't understand what it's like to be the sole experienced nurse on the night shift in a 20 bed unit!
    LadyFree28 and OCNRN63 like this.
  5. Visit  SHGR profile page
    1
    Quote from 07302003
    Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    I don't understand what all these CRNA students will do, assuming they graduate and become CRNA's. But it sounds like in the meantime, it's not just ICU that's the glamour job, but specifically SICU and CVICU? It's such a hierarchy. My outpatient world must be at the bottom...except for NPs.
    OCNRN63 likes this.
  6. Visit  manusko profile page
    0
    Quote from 07302003
    I get you Ruby Vee. I only spent 3 years in ICU, before I couldn't take working nights any more, and couldn't see hope of moving to days in the near future. (And I regret leaving the bedside, I miss it a lot.) But with new staff you have no one to watch your back if you have a patient crashing. With new staff you are up a creek if there is a code, or two codes. New staff may not be organized enough to be there to help you turn and clean a patient. New staff may miss subltle signs of decompensation and not intervene until it is too late, so you feel like you are watching the whole floor. You are ALWAYS the resource person - you don't have others with experience to bounce stuff off of - hey, tell me what you think is going on with this patient, or, I can't figure this out... Where I work the SICU and CVICU are CRNA wanna-be destinations, with high turnover. The MICU has a more stable staff, with a lot of COBs. Because you can't go to CRNA school if you work the MICU.
    Several MICU applicants get into school. Not all applicants are SICU and CVICU. Some are even PICU and NICU.
  7. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    5
    Quote from kungpoopanda
    I'm not aware of it being a "fact" that "they" want money without work. What a generalization! Where is your evidence?
    I'm basing my evidence of almost 14 YEARS of potential and actual cohorts, and even nursing instructors, and some peers that I worked alongside, some I had to precept; when you hear "my worth" thrown about since July 2000 or as long as I have in this business; then come back with your own EBP; this is NOT a new phenomenon. Thanks.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Feb 8, '14
  8. Visit  PediLove2147 profile page
    1
    It was a lot easier to get a job in the specialty you wanted 10 years ago. People now are desperate and take whatever job they can which sometimes results in them not liking it/looking for a new job shortly after being hired.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  9. Visit  Concerto_in_C profile page
    1
    Job hopping as a resume issue does not hurt certified nurses with credentials (e.g. certifications) and experience in the high-demand specialties. I met a very young CCU nurse who is in her early to mid 20s who has already changed units like 6 times and you can bet if she asks for a new position again she will get it.

    Employers don't think in term of what's righteous or honorable, they think in terms of stealing qualified professionals from their competitors.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  10. Visit  geekynurseRN profile page
    3
    It took me 6 months to get my first nursing job and I worked in a prison for 6 months, moved to another state and got 9 months med/surg experience, moved to another state and got 7 months critical care experience. I start next week (my dream job) in L&D and I have no regrets. True I miss the friends I made along the way but I've always known I wanted to be a L&D nurse, it's just no one has given me the chance until now. Anyways I can understand how you feel having to precept people and then have them leave, but everyone must follow their own path.
  11. Visit  Kipahni profile page
    1
    When I first read this I was in the camp of "who cares" if these nurses choose to career hop. After all it is a free country and I would want everyone to pursue the career of ones choice.

    And then I floated from my Orth med/surg floor to our IMU

    IMU is a small unit of 10 beds. They only have 2 FT nurses. 1 for days and 1 for nights. Both have worked there less than 4 years. They have float staff work with them everyday. I was appalled by this. I asked how could this be? The nurses reply was while the ICU has a turn over of 5-10 a year they are a large enough unit to not notice the void (though still there) She trains a nurse and a year later they transfer to the ICU. She said at first this would bother her, now she has just accepted this as fact.

    I can not imagine not having the support and camaraderie that comes with years of working together. My ortho floor is so cohesive that during a code everyone already knows exactly what to do like a well oiled machine.
    wooh likes this.
  12. Visit  MyUserName,RN profile page
    2
    Hospitals just don't make it easy to "want to stay". There is really no benefit to staying long term in one hospital, at least not in my area. Maybe that is part of the reason for the high turnover and not just due to it being a stepping stone. I left my floor right after I hit the two year mark. Had the hospital admin made it a more pleasant work environment and given more reason to be loyal, maybe the high turnover would improve.
  13. Visit  kungpoopanda profile page
    1
    Quote from LadyFree28
    I'm basing my evidence of almost 14 YEARS of potential and actual cohorts, and even nursing instructors, and some peers that I worked alongside, some I had to precept; when you hear "my worth" thrown about since July 2000 or as long as I have in this business; then come back with your own EBP; this is NOT a new phenomenon. Thanks.
    Anecdotal with significant researcher bias.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.

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