Why are so many of us over weight? - page 6

If we are supposed to be good role models when it comes to health, why is it that so many of us are overweight? I'm just a student, so I don't know much, but I want to know what everyone else thinks... Read More

  1. by   nurse4theplanet
    I say you leave it open...its a worthy enough topic to debate. I think the real underlying message in this thread is students preconceived ideas of what nurses are and are not *supposed* to be (as said by one skinny minny nursing student)

    I thinks the term 'FAT' has just made this a little too hot and personal (I hate STEREOTYPES and offensive terms...obese or weight challenged would have been more appropriate)
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    No, you didn't say it was a violation of the TOS, but i was using that as an example of a reason not to close the thread (thinking that the TOS violation has been a reason for past threads on various subjects to get padlocked.)
  3. by   onconurseRT
    But secondly- NONE of my job descriptions ever discussed being a good role model. Sorry but that is just a bunch of hooey sold to us in school.[/QUOTE]

    I would have to respectfully disagree... I was never "sold hooey" in nursing school that had anything to do with being a good role model in life. I realized the impact and importance of being a good role model well before that. I have the distinct privelege of raising 3 boys that are not biologically mine for the simple fact that they desperately need someone to love them and to serve as a responsible role model for them at home as well as at work. My job description does include this as well. Part of the yearly evaluation and job description does contain "blocks" that include the 'ability to serve as a resource and a role model to all students, new employees as well as fellow co-workers.'

    Thanks
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I thinks the term 'FAT' has just made this a little too hot and personal (I hate STEREOTYPES and offensive terms...obese or weight challenged would have been more appropriate)
    Ok, well, i'm asking this because i want to know, and i'm asking this to anyone, i only quoted this part of a person's post to show where i thought of this question from, and not asking this particular person.

    Why are some people not offended by the word "fat"? I understand why people could be offended by the word, but i really don't know why someone wouldn't be?
  5. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from sarahhoughton
    If we are supposed to be good role models when it comes to health, why is it that so many of us are overweight? I'm just a student, so I don't know much, but I want to know what everyone else thinks about this!! Is it because there is no time to exercise with 12 hours shifts, and no time to find healthy food because there are such short lunch breaks? These are what I am guessing, but I want to know from real nurses why all of y'all think so many of your co-workers are overweight. (I don't mean to offend anyone with this post!!) Just curious!! Thanks for any opinions you have.

    *HOORAY* new title...

    back to the subject

    ideally, we would all love to be the perfect role models for our patients, yet that is simply unattainable. Overweight issues are no different. Let's say the nurse counseling you on how to eat properly weighs twice as much as you do. Does that make her educational instruction less credible? No. Why? Because you don't know why SHE is overweight...thyroid problem, genetics, depression, overeating, or just too busy taking good care of pt's like you that she sacrifices her lunch breaks.

    You wanted to know what everyone else thinks about this...Well *I* think that we should look beyond size and focus on ability of our nurses.

    Yes it could be because of long shifts, no lunch breaks, easy access to chips/cokes/coffee, etc. But there are more variables in regards to the individual that also add to the problem...so it's not so easy to just say that is the reason why there are obese nurses. Just because one changes an occupation doesn't mean it will change their wt much so I really don't think they are as closely related as some studies would like you to believe.

    Oh...and I forgive you for your originally offensive title. You are new and curious and this was probably not a warm welcome. Feel free to post all your questions in the future without worrying what others will think. Many times I have posted something that I thought was meant and worded in the nicest manner...only to get completely:flamesonb
  6. by   Turd.Ferguson
    As neither an overweight person nor a nurse (I'm a student), I find this thread interesting. I have wondered the same thing that the original poster asked. I know that the great majority of nurses work their butts off, so why the great number of people who are overweight? My decision was that nurses reflect society in general. There are a lot of people who are overweight. Even athletes; look at football linemen.

    We now know that the word "fat" is "politically incorrect" and should not be mentioned in postings, lest a verbal whipping occurs.
  7. by   P_RN
    My padlocking equipment is off duty. Thanks.
  8. by   truern
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    *HOORAY* new title...
    Oh...and I forgive you for your originally offensive title.
    Huh?? It's the same old title, isn't it??
  9. by   bethin
    Umm, I'm guessing because we are human? We eat on the run and we're lucky if we pee in a 12hr. shift. Did you know nurses (or CNA's, etc.) have the highest incidence of UTI's? Also, I think maybe some of the extra weight can be contributed to emotional eating. We see people on the worst days of their lives. I don't know about everyone else, but there are some patients you never get out of your mind. Whenever I think of the patient that died of bone cancer that was only 24 y.o. I want to hit Ben and Jerry's. Is there an emotional eaters anynonmous out there?

    Another reason, who has the energy to work out after a 12 hr. shift? The last thing I want to do is be on my feet. I thank God for my 20 min. drive to and from work.
    Last edit by bethin on Nov 14, '05
  10. by   redwinggirlie
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I work 40 hours a week. Sometimes--no, a lot of times--more.

    I have chronic pain. But I keep working.

    I have had a couple of killer illnesses and survived. And I keep working.

    I regard myself as victorious.


    Because I'm alive.

    And I can still go to work and help others stay alive.

    And I guarantee you that the patient that I did chest compressions on last week won't remember what I looked like, or the other members of the Code team.

    But I remember quite clearly when the doc told us to stop compressions because we had a pulse.

    Nobody kicked me out of that room for being fat. No one complained that my clothes were wrinkled, my hair wasn't perfect, or that I didn't have designer underwear on, a made-up face and fake nails.

    Role model? You bet I am. In all the stuff that really counts in life.
    You are awesome!
  11. by   P_RN
    Yeah, I tried to ameliorate the title...apparently I could only adjust the ones at the top of a post....the OLD (blankety) title stayed on the main forum screen. Sorry....my bad.
  12. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from truesn
    Huh?? It's the same old title, isn't it??
    well yes and no apparently...the topic name seems to have a mind of its own haha

    thanks for at least trying P_RN!!! wonderful gesture
  13. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from P_RN
    Yeah, I tried to ameliorate the title...apparently I could only adjust the ones at the top of a post....the OLD (blankety) title stayed on the main forum screen. Sorry....my bad.
    Ok, so i wasn't the only one seeign two different titles lol.

    Maybe a co-admin could fix it.

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