Why are RN's so fat! - page 2

I was told by a nanny last night that her employer just had a baby, and she commented on how fat the RN's are at the hospital (Her employer is thin). Her employer stated that "being RN's... Read More

  1. by   K98
    Pass the donuts...urp...
  2. by   Jules A
    Quote from nursemike
    I know some slender people who work at staying fit, but I know many who don't do anything different from anyone else and simply don't gain weight. I know a few slender people who really aren't as fit as I am--they may look better, but lack my stamina and ability to exert myself.
    I don't think weight has anything to do with the quality of a nurse for sure. However I'm not offended by someone saying nurses are fat because largely its true and as people pointed out we could say that about many Americans. I am offended when someone says that I must have a fast metabolism because I am slim. No, I just don't eat that much. I totally agree that being slender and fit can be two totally different things. I also believe, however, that most people who are slender do not over indulge. Truth is, other than in the cases of medical issues, body weight is about intake and out put, simple as that.
  3. by   nursemike
    Ever since I got this years tax refund, I've been contemplating a laptop. I already have a wireless home network. But I don't know--the last thing I probably need is one less excuse to get out of bed. I work 12hr nights, so my sack time is precious.

    On my nights off, if the weather is fit, the one thing my cats like better than laying around is a nice, long walk. But walking cats isn't very aerobic. We cover about 1/8th mile in about 40 minutes. Still, bushes get marked, storm drains investigated, and trees climbed. It's just a mess when all four of them come.
  4. by   rngreenhorn
    Quote from nursemike
    I'm 5'6", and it ain't pretty. But I find it interesting that you mention cats in your sig. Have you noticed that cats seem to be drawn to the most sedentary person in the household? Mine are conditioning me to lounge around all day--at this very moment, one is looking at me with disapproval for wasting time on the internet when I could be lying on the sofa watching t.v.
    I often find myself competing with the cat for the perfect sun-soaked mid-afternoon napping destination.
  5. by   rngreenhorn
    And my dog is looking at me right now saying "hey fatty, how about getting off the computer and taking me for a walk."
  6. by   PeachPie
    Nurses are like cops: They get injuries from the job, which makes them more sedentary, which in combination with convenience food, makes them obese.
  7. by   nursemike
    Quote from Jules A
    I don't think weight has anything to do with the quality of a nurse for sure. However I'm not offended by someone saying nurses are fat because largely its true and as people pointed out we could say that about many Americans. I am offended when someone says that I must have a fast metabolism because I am slim. No, I just don't eat that much. I totally agree that being slender and fit can be two totally different things. I also believe, however, that most people who are slender do not over indulge. Truth is, other than in the cases of medical issues, body weight is about intake and out put, simple as that.
    I commend your restraint. To be sure, moderation is a virtue, and moderation in eating is certainly an advantage. But I'm more and more convinced that is isn't "as simple as that." I know too many thin people who eat more than I do, and worse things than I usually do.
    My thyroid function is perfectly normal. Most of the time, my intake and output are balanced. My weight gain has been a series of plateaus, generally as my activity level has decreased with age and my appetite took time to adapt. When I was a 25 yr old carpenter, I lost weight on 3600 kcal/day. As a 50 yr old nurse, I maintain my weight on 2200.
    Clearly, I could reduce my intake to 2000 and increase my activity even a bit, and lose weight. In fact, I'm trying to do that, despite my joking. I admire those who've succeeded in just such a plan, and envy those who don't need to. I remind myself frequently that it should get easier as my proportion of lean mass to fat improves, but in the mean time, I do object to those who suggest I'm obese because of some moral flaw. I am neither lazy nor a glutton, I'm just fat. (I'm not accusing anyone on this thread of being judgemental or self-righteous, but there are those in this world who are.)
  8. by   RUcon08
    I'm in nursing school, and definitely remember my best friend making an observation that "all nurses have the pear-shaped figure." Of course she was pushing it by saying "all", but that's just our humor and I wasn't offended. Not offended just because I'll be a [male] nurse by next year and pear-shaped figures are kind of hard for those types, there's always the chance of android obesity.

    Anyway, I've actually noticed this to be pretty true, though. More often than not, nurses are overweight. It doesn't bother me, just reminds me to definitely stay in shape and not follow the trend since it seems the profession might be conducive to such... problems(?). Which I'll definitely have to keep in mind since I know my metabolism won't be amazing forever...
  9. by   MoriahRoseRN
    Intake + output does not always add up. I have a metabolic issue which makes it very hard for me to lose weight or to keep it off for that matter than the average person.
  10. by   Cherish
    Most people's weight reflects what is happening in our society. There are people in the military over weight. Lawyers, doctors, cops, any profession has people that are overweight in America. When you go to another country though you do not see that many overweight people and if you go to none tourist areas and eat their food it is usually more healthier and contain more veggies and less fat than American restaurants. I think it's a problem across AMERICA not on a profession.
  11. by   nursemike
    Quote from PeachPie
    Nurses are like cops: They get injuries from the job, which makes them more sedentary, which in combination with convenience food, makes them obese.
    I think, too, that like many occupations, nursing is a poor fit with our hunter/gatherer biology. In my youth, I'd have scoffed at the idea that nursing is physically demanding. Today I don't scoff. We spend plenty of time walking and lifting and so forth. But by far the worse strain is mental and emotional. Like every other nurse I know (fat or thin) I leave work after 12 hrs feeling pretty much drained. But as a carpenter I burned more calories before lunch than I do now in a shift.
    I very much hope to be fifty pounds lighter in the not-too-distant future, but if I succeed, it will have more to do with how I spend my days off.
  12. by   Jules A
    Quote from nursemike
    But I'm more and more convinced that is isn't "as simple as that." I know too many thin people who eat more than I do, and worse things than I usually do.

    I am neither lazy nor a glutton, I'm just fat. (I'm not accusing anyone on this thread of being judgemental or self-righteous, but there are those in this world who are.)
    No judgments here because Jules has a big enough job worrying about herself. :wink2:

    I don't eat as much as my heavier friends on a daily basis and if I do pig out one day the next day I'll hardly eat at all. I think it adds up. However truth be told, after the age of 40 unless you work out like a fiend (which I don't) , no matter how kicking your butt looks in a pair of Levi's, the clothes need to stay on! Food just isn't my bag and I know that makes it easier also. I guess the moral of the story is that if you are over 35, in decent shape and enjoy eating "have at it" because skipping desert probably won't make you look like Cindy Crawford or Brad Pitt anyway, lol.
  13. by   muffie
    why are nanny's so judgemental [sp]

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