Why are Hospitals so darn mean when someone fails the NCLEX? - page 4

My wife works at an Indianapolis facility and one of her friends (not the same one referenced in a seperate post) just failed the NCLEX. Here's how they handled the situation: 1. She was stopped... Read More

  1. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I see your point, but without an objective reference a correct answer is merely the opinion of an author rather than a fact or best answer.

    Look that the front of textbooks. The MINIMUM amount of contributors i've personally seen is 15.

    The words are not just submitted and printed, they're reviewed for accuracy and truth first.

    The only time i've seen opinion in them are when a "recommendation" by a group or associated is used.


    Not to mention challenges under the American With Disabilities Act that the test discriminates too much against those with certain learning disabilities.
    Because there aren't any references for the NCLEX context ?????


    Any way that you (yourself) are looking at it, you're going to see it as biased.

    You cannot expect the NCLEX to accomodate you.
  2. by   Roland
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Look that the front of textbooks. The MINIMUM amount of contributors i've personally seen is 15.

    The words are not just submitted and printed, they're reviewed for accuracy and truth first.

    The only time i've seen opinion in them are when a "recommendation" by a group or associated is used.




    Because there aren't any references for the NCLEX context ?????


    Any way that you (yourself) are looking at it, you're going to see it as biased.

    You cannot expect the NCLEX to accomodate you.
    Good point. The Leftest Liberal part of my brain cries "All Tests are unfair at least to someone" while the right wing Libaugh faction screams that they may be necessary, but should emanate from the private sector. In all seriousness am I the only one that sees a qualitative difference between the NCLEX and other professional level examinations (in a bad way). How can that be? Almost everyone I know that's taken the darn thing decries how ridiculous, unreasonable and useless it was (especially the ones who do well). However, almost no one here has expressed these sentiments (at least that I've seen then again I have a tendency to read and post like a madman for two days and then go away for months).
  3. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    In all seriousness am I the only one that sees a qualitative difference between the NCLEX and other professional level examinations (in a bad way).
    That's because they aren't the same professions.

    And i won't express how ridiculous the NCLEX was, because i went in not knowing what kind of questions i'd get, the format (i knew it was computerized and it would shut off at some point), etc.

    Kinda sounds like the world of nursing, ya know, going in to work, not knowing what'll happen, what pts. you'll get, etc. And i think that's the point of the test, to expect anything, because that's the way the real world is. And you don't get references ahead of time to have a leg up on it.
  4. by   *PICURN*
    At the hospital I work at, you can work as an "IPRN" or Interim Permit Registered Nurse" until you take your boards (after you apply for the permit) If you pass, you become a Clinical Nurse I (CNI), and if you fail, you have to send your permit back to the state and the hospital may offer you a position as a CNA until you pass your boards.

    The second an IPRN fails her boards, her permit is invalid and she can no longer function as a GN. The IPRN's basically function as a regular nurse, but with an RN supervising them (since most of the time when you are an IPRN you are just starting out and on orientation anyway).
  5. by   brina
    Quote from Lawnurse
    This is not a strong statement - any employer can fire any employee at any time for (almost) any reason. Its called at-will employment which is what all nurses have.

    I think we are being too hard on Roland. We all know one person who failed NCLEX the first time and ended up being a very decent nurse anyway. I venture to say that the NCLEX is not a highly valid test of a good or safe nurse. Remember how we had to learn to differentiate between the actual answer and the "ivory tower nursing" answer that was actually the correct answer on the NCLEX?

    Or that we would get practice questions wrong because we answer the question in terms of the current technology that we actually use during clinical, forgetting for a moment that all NCLEX questions are at least 3 to 5 years old?

    Or that you sometimes wanted to add "and then get sued for malpractice" to what you find out from the answer key was actually the correct answer?

    And we have probably all chosen to forget the NCLEX questions that were just rediculous because they strayed so far from reality.

    I remember a lot of questions going something like this:
    Your patient is hemorrhaging from every pore of his body. The nurse should:
    a) call for help
    b) continue to breath, blink, circulate blood, and call for help
    c) call for help before any subsequent blinking, breathing, or movement of blood
    d) call for a pastoral consult as the patient is so obviously about to croak.

    Not saying we don't need NCLEX, just trying to provide a reality check.
    LOL !!!
  6. by   austin heart
    [QUOTE=caroladybelle]Actually, in the my state of graduation, in 1994, per the Board: a Graduate Nurse was only a "graduate nurse" until the NCLEX was taken at the earliest opportunity and must be passed, otherwise they legally lost the title graduate nurse.

    If you either didn't take the first possible NCLEX test post graduation, or didn't pass, you lost the legal right to use that title.

    This may vary state to state, but has been the rule of the BON in some places.
    QUOTE]



    This is the way it is in Texas too.
  7. by   steelcityrn
    Why would a hospital publish the results of anyones nxclex results, be it pass or fail? This crosses the line as far as i am concerned. Whats next, maybe publish the next time a piece of equiptment fails a test, or how about the next spread of infections from unsterile procedures. Come on, the more I think about it, it seems like the hospitals way of showing you to the door...
  8. by   tridil2000
    Quote from Roland
    Why coudn't she do the same things that she did as a grad nurse? All I'm saying is give her at least one more chance to pass the test before turning her life upside down. Also, I find it ironic that we are constantly preached to about patient confidentiality while at the same time it is collectively "spit upon" in the case of co-workers, and employees. Even a student nurse can do more than a CNA especially one that has been "checked off" on various advanced skills which she has. I could even see cutting the pay to $15.00/hr. I'm sure she will be able to focus on her next exam now that her life has been turned upside down. That damm test is stupid anyway. Why can't they test "basic concepts" in a straightforward manner like almost every other professional licensing examination. For example I have taken and passed State Licensing examinations in Real Estate Sales, Appraisal, Fire Fighting I&II, EMT-B, CPR ect. In all of those cases I was asked things that I should definitiely know if I was awake in class and did the readings. Furthermore, the questions were very straightforward with no "word game" or multiple correct/almost correct answers. When did nurses collectively buy into the "critical thinking" psychobabble, pandered by MENSA happy, MIT psychometric fixated geeks?



    OH MY GOD!!
  9. by   mariedoreen
    Quote from Roland
    By the way the facility in question is a magnet hospital and is considered one of the very best in the area.
    Oh so it gets even better! They're expunging your reputation in one of the best hospitals in the area! Then I would definitely leave, I'm sure they'll have many more to take my place, and my parting line would still be... Since you love printing personal information for all to see here's my resignation, you can put it next to my now successful NCLEX results. Thanks for paying for all that training and good bye!

    And to those blasting the OP about the NCLEX, he's got a point. The questions are often ambiguous and extremely annoying in their inability to simply ask a straight question about what we know. But...

    ...on the flip side, I am one of those who has now bought into the critical thinking psychobabble Marxist nursing bs (were those your exact words??) as well... because, nursing is problem solving. You go to work and you're given a set of data and told to make sense of it. You have to know how to think critically: how to attack the problem and sort the data effectively in order to solve your patient's problem. In addition to testing our knowledge base, NCLEX questions (as much as we hate it) are also testing our ability to work that process.
  10. by   Roland
    Quote from mariedoreen
    Oh so it gets even better! They're expunging your reputation in one of the best hospitals in the area! Then I would definitely leave, I'm sure they'll have many more to take my place, and my parting line would still be... Since you love printing personal information for all to see here's my resignation, you can put it next to my now successful NCLEX results. Thanks for paying for all that training and good bye!

    And to those blasting the OP about the NCLEX, he's got a point. The questions are often ambiguous and extremely annoying in their inability to simply ask a straight question about what we know. But...

    ...on the flip side, I am one of those who has now bought into the critical thinking psychobabble Marxist nursing bs (were those your exact words??) as well... because, nursing is problem solving. You go to work and you're given a set of data and told to make sense of it. You have to know how to think critically: how to attack the problem and sort the data effectively in order to solve your patient's problem. In addition to testing our knowledge base, NCLEX questions (as much as we hate it) are also testing our ability to work that process.
    Let me go a bit further. Why, are your NCLEX results anyone's business other than you and your employer? As it stands here (Indiana) anyone can do a license search at www.in.gov two days after you take the test and see whether or not you passed (they can also get your home address as a nice bonus). Did any of you ever get a bad grade in college? How would you have felt if the college newspaper had printed on page three BOB SMITH scores a D- on his A&P midterm! She was actually told about her failing score by staff who learned it from co-workers who were checking the state website like school girls every ten minutes. Note, this happens everyday all over the State (and I doubt we are the only state where this information is available online like this).
  11. by   mercyteapot
    Wow. I doubt very much that CA would make that info available to the general public, but I've never tested that theory. I have always used my maiden name professionally and legally, and my married name in situations where familiarity is appropriate. I don't know that it keeps me any safer, but I do like the idea of people from work not being able to find me at home, and people from my life outside work not knowing how to access professional information about me.
  12. by   closatssl1
    Quote from mercyteapot
    When I graduated, in 1984, and in Pennsylvania, we were given 2 chances to pass before our GN status was pulled. Once the status was pulled, though, you were bumped down to CNA. I don't see any way around that one, unless there was some sort of tiered pay system that paid extra per unit of education, or something. That would be a mess, though. Advertising it in the hospital newsletter is cruel. I'd rethink working at that facility.
    EXACTLY! YOU WERE GIVEN 2 CHANCES TO PASS THE BOARD BEFORE THEY PULL YOUR GN STATUS! WHY WOULD THEY NEED TO PULL THAT STATUS AFTER ONLY 1 FAIL? DON'T YOU HAVE 6 MONTHS FOR YOUR TEMPORARY LICENSE? ARE U REQUIRED TO TELL YOUR EMPLOYER WHEN U R TAKING YOUR STATE BOARD? AREN'T U ALLOWED TO TAKE THE STATE BOARD AT LEAST 3 TIMES WITHIN THE 6 MONTH PERIOD?
  13. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from closatssl1
    EXACTLY! YOU WERE GIVEN 2 CHANCES TO PASS THE BOARD BEFORE THEY PULL YOUR GN STATUS! WHY WOULD THEY NEED TO PULL THAT STATUS AFTER ONLY 1 FAIL? DON'T YOU HAVE 6 MONTHS FOR YOUR TEMPORARY LICENSE? ARE U REQUIRED TO TELL YOUR EMPLOYER WHEN U R TAKING YOUR STATE BOARD? AREN'T U ALLOWED TO TAKE THE STATE BOARD AT LEAST 3 TIMES WITHIN THE 6 MONTH PERIOD?
    Back then, they were only offered twice a year- in July and Feb. As mentioned before, they were taken with paper and pencil over a two day period. Very different from the way it works now, so it is hard for me to make any comparison.

close