Who is REALLY GOOD with needles?

  1. Hi, My name is Adria and I am a student, I will be starting clinicals in August. I was wondering if anyone could explain the process of giving shots, drawing blood, and putting in IV's. Also, Can anyone tell me any tricks of the trade to make these processes virtually painless for the patient. I am very nervous of not being good at these tasks, and am afraid of causing the paitent any significant pain. I am somewhat wary of needles, so this is something that I want to overcome and become really good at. Please help all of you excellent needle experts!!!!!

    Thanks
    Adria
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  2. 76 Comments

  3. by   Katnip
    All those things are best learned through practice. It would be very difficult to explain each process in writing well enough for you to "get it."You'll start in a lab setting to learn the basics there and then go on to real people. You'll get over your fear of needles with practice.

    Don't worry about causing pain. Some patients will tell you it was nothing, others will start caterwauling before you touch them.

    Good luck and just do the best you can.
  4. by   PowerPuffGirl
    Echo Heron has written a few books about her experience in nursing school and then as a critical care nurse, that are worth a read. Can't think of the titles, but I think they're something like _Intensive Care: Story of a Nurse_ and _Critical Condition: The Story of a Nurse Continues_.

    Anyhow, in the first book, there's a hilarious part about the first time she has to administer an IM injection... to a rather precocious child. Definately pick up a copy of the book to read- it may help!
  5. by   colleen10
    Hi Adria,

    I start clinicals in the Fall so I don't have any experience under my belt but I do know that when my aunt was in nursing school she practiced injections with an orange. She was allowed to take a needle home and practiced sticking our produce.

    I have given injections to sheep when I worked on my universitys farm and I have to say that it really isn't all that bad or hard to do. While we didn't follow the type of "protocols" that nurses do I thought for sure I couldn't do it just because the thought that you are sticking someone else, but it wasn't that bad.

    Plus, I figure if I can successfully do it while wrangling livestock hopefully I can do it with a person just sitting there
  6. by   delirium
    Don't worry about it. You'll have mannequins to practice on, and when you give an injection or start an IV on a patient, your instructor or a nurse will be with you.

    Take it easy. Save the stress for clinicals.
  7. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    I practiced with an orange when I was in school. It helped me get the feel of actually sticking something with a needle.
  8. by   delirium
    I disagree. Injecting an orange and injecting a person are two entirely different things.

    I remember thinking what a difference there was between the mannequin and a person. You don't have to use half the force to puncture the skin. I think practicing on oranges could make a person a little, oh, overzealous.

    But it is better than nothing, and if you're that concerned... have fun.
  9. by   AAHZ
    JUST REMEMBER,
    1) ANY NEEDLE IS EASIER TO TAKE, WHEN YOUR LOOKING AT IT FROM THE DULL SIDE.

    2) THE SIZE AND SHARPNESS OF A NEEDLE "SHOULD" BE IN DIRECT RELATIONSHIP TO THE ATITUDE OF THE PATIENT.

    3) IT WILL ALWAYS HURT THEM MORE THEN IT WILL HURT YOU.

    GOOD LUCK, AND DON'T SWEAT IT.
  10. by   Rena RN 2003
    Originally posted by AAHZ
    JUST REMEMBER,
    1) ANY NEEDLE IS EASIER TO TAKE, WHEN YOUR LOOKING AT IT FROM THE DULL SIDE.

    2) THE SIZE AND SHARPNESS OF A NEEDLE "SHOULD" BE IN DIRECT RELATIONSHIP TO THE ATITUDE OF THE PATIENT.

    3) IT WILL ALWAYS HURT THEM MORE THEN IT WILL HURT YOU.

    GOOD LUCK, AND DON'T SWEAT IT.

    :roll :roll :roll BAHAHAHA!!!!!
  11. by   ayemmeff
    Originally posted by delirium
    I disagree. Injecting an orange and injecting a person are two entirely different things.

    I remember thinking what a difference there was between the mannequin and a person. You don't have to use half the force to puncture the skin. I think practicing on oranges could make a person a little, oh, overzealous.

    But it is better than nothing, and if you're that concerned... have fun.

    and oranges/mannequins don't scream or faint!
  12. by   delirium
    Originally posted by ayemmeff
    and oranges/mannequins don't scream or faint!
    Um, neither have any of my patients.

    You must have a really special injection technique.
  13. by   ayemmeff
    Originally posted by delirium
    Um, neither have any of my patients.

    You must have a really special injection technique.

  14. by   kavi
    When I was learning I did a 'google' search under "Phlebotomy education" and found some helpful sites. I didn't keep them, but you might try that.

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