Who is REALLY GOOD with needles? - page 3

Hi, My name is Adria and I am a student, I will be starting clinicals in August. I was wondering if anyone could explain the process of giving shots, drawing blood, and putting in IV's. Also, Can... Read More

  1. by   hey_nurse
    Originally posted by PowerPuffGirl
    Echo Heron has written a few books about her experience in nursing school and then as a critical care nurse, that are worth a read. Can't think of the titles, but I think they're something like _Intensive Care: Story of a Nurse_ and _Critical Condition: The Story of a Nurse Continues_.

    Anyhow, in the first book, there's a hilarious part about the first time she has to administer an IM injection... to a rather precocious child. Definately pick up a copy of the book to read- it may help!
    have read all of her books would highly recommend them
  2. by   Kathy Gallimore
    Be patient you will learn. Of course you are going to be over anxious @ 1st., but your teachers will help you. My biggest tip when giving shots is to be quick with the insertion of the needle. I know it sounds terrible to say it this way but my teachers taught me to treat the needle like a dart when you are inserting it. Do not gradually insert the needle for this can damage the tissues and cause considerable pain. After "darting the needle" into the tissue- muscle- make sure it goes all the way in if intramuscular injection then pull back on the syringe to make sure there is no blood return and you're not in a vessell. You would not want to shoot the medicine straight into a vessel. if no blood return quickly push the plunger all the way and immediatley pull the needled out. Immediatley take a swab that you should have in your other hand and press lightly on the place of the shot. Not to sharply. This will help spread the feeling of the pain so it is not so sharp and keeps the medicine from oozing back out. If it is a thick medicine(like penicillin) you will have to go slowly when pushing it in. There really is not much of a way to keep some medicine like penicilin form hurting. Keep in mind you are helping this patient with this medicine and sometimes it is more welcome than the alternative, of not getting the medicine. Especially if they are already in pain, such as from surgery. Hope this helps. The act itself seems so simple. This is the way I do intramuscular injections and have had much success of patients telling me it didn't hurt. The way you present yourself has a little to do with it so always try to be pleasant and smile as much as you can as long as it is appropriate. There are other types of injections but I want go into them at this time. I didn't realize it would be so indept in explaining. Good Luck!
  3. by   geleesa
    I'm in my med surg rotation and all we do is give heparin and lovenox sub Q.... its great! right in the belly....dont aspirate!

    I feel like a pro! well ..... with sq inj-- we havent tackled iv's yet.

    good luck-- you will do fine.. Plus dont worry about it so soon!

    enjoy your summer

    geleesa
  4. by   bagladyrn
    Remember too that the same people who will have a fit over having an injection or having an i.v. started are often the same ones who will voluntarily have their tongue, navel, or other parts of their anatomy pierced!
  5. by   geleesa
    Originally posted by bagladyrn
    Remember too that the same people who will have a fit over having an injection or having an i.v. started are often the same ones who will voluntarily have their tongue, navel, or other parts of their anatomy pierced!
    That is so true!! I had a pt w/ a stud in each eyebrow and he asked me if the inj was gonna hurt........
  6. by   Disablednurse
    Adria, you will find that the majority of patients that you have to stick are very understanding when a student has to start an IV on them or give them an injection. They realize that you are learning. I tried on some that were much calmer than I was when I stuck them. You will learn and look back on it and wonder what you were so worried about.
  7. by   fab4fan
    I try to use distraction...if it's an IM in the butt I tell them to wiggle their toes ("keep wiggling...keep wiggling"). I use this for peds and adults.

    IV starts, I use distraction again to get his mind off the IV...I'll try talking about some sports game, get him talk about his job, etc

    Having kids blow soap bubbles can help take their minds off getting a shot.
  8. by   deespoohbear
    Like another poster stated, be quick with the insertion for an IM. And steady. Try not to jiggle the needle too much. And let the alcohol dry first. If the person is standing have them turn their feet inward. Helps keep them from tensing their backside when their feet are turned inward. You will soon get to be a pro at it.
  9. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    I wasn't trying to imply that oranges take the place of practicing actual injections. Simply meant that perhaps it would make her a bit more comfortable with the syringe.
  10. by   career seeker
    I agree with the quick insertion. The "dart technique" works for me as well!

    My favorite so far was a man in his 40's who was havig a baisc blood draw. He told me he was extrememly afraid of needles and was sweating profusly. I tried to distract him with conversation as he rolled up his sleeves......his arms were covered with tatoos.....go figure. He almost passed out when he saw the blood in the tube!
  11. by   hogan4736
    distraction is a great idea...

    i tell them i'll count to three then stick, and then stick on two...

    and the "i didn't (or won't) feel a thing line" always gets a laugh, and relaxes everyone...



    Last edit by hogan4736 on Mar 26, '03
  12. by   sixes
    Originally posted by ayemmeff
    and oranges/mannequins don't scream or faint!
    It's not so bad giving needles. I am terrified of having needles myself and I thought I'd faint or something when I had to learn these procedures.
    We practised on pieces of raw chicken the skin and meat has the same feel as a real person. Use good handwashing after to prevent sominealla
    My first inj was an IM gluteous maximus. I don't know who was more scared me or my patient. I held my breath so long I almost fainted.
    Needless to say we both survived.
  13. by   SingingNurse2
    Originally posted by career seeker

    My favorite so far was a man in his 40's who was havig a baisc blood draw. He told me he was extrememly afraid of needles and was sweating profusly. I tried to distract him with conversation as he rolled up his sleeves......his arms were covered with tatoos.....go figure. He almost passed out when he saw the blood in the tube!
    He had probably had a few drinks before the tatoos - many people that I know get them that way.

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