Who is REALLY GOOD with needles? - page 2

Hi, My name is Adria and I am a student, I will be starting clinicals in August. I was wondering if anyone could explain the process of giving shots, drawing blood, and putting in IV's. Also, Can... Read More

  1. by   Furball
    I've had pts scream at a sc injection and others who slept thru an ABG draw (ow!) You won't be able to avoid pain all the time. Practice, practice, practice.
  2. by   GPatty
    It'll just take practice.
    But you'll do fine....honest.
  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    practice, practice and more practice. Dont' expect you will gain such a skill overnight or that any "tricks" will make you competent. Watch the competency of an experienced nurse, and learn and practice. That is all I can advise. Take EACH and EVERY opportunity to DO these skills while in school to gain confidence. Good luck!
  4. by   Flynurse
    I always say really fast, "That didn't hurt me a bit!"
  5. by   IndyGypsyNurse
    Hi, I just wanted to say thankyou for all the advice. I learn alot from this forum and I LOVE IT! I am on here all the time just reading and reading to prepare myself. I noticed a few people suggested that I practice on an orange, but an oranges peel is tough and wouldnt simulate a humans soft, supple flesh. Wouldnt you think that a PEACH might be more representative? Thoughts?
    Adria
  6. by   emily_mom
    Originally posted by delirium
    Um, neither have any of my patients.

    You must have a really special injection technique.
    Yes, I've heard about your bedside manner....

    I had to put in an IV on a fellow student (and close friend) as a demonstration to the 3rd semester Skills students. My instructor chose me b/c I had been doing it at my job for quite awhile and my friend as the recipient b/c she was an EMT w/ good veins.

    Well, she passed out. Cold. She said, "I don't feel well," so I pulled it out just before she hit the floor. Apparently she had been sick and just got woozy. Boy, did I feel like shyt.

    Just because you have done it a lot, people still keel over. We just have the advantage that they are always in bed already...
  7. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Originally posted by emily_mom
    She said, "I don't feel well," so I pulled it out just before she hit the floor.
  8. by   P_RN
    Wear gloves
    Wear gloves
    Wear gloves

    Aim and stick

    Practice
    Practice
    Practice and all of a sudden you will "get it" and be the nurse everyone comes to for assistance.
  9. by   Dr. Kate
    Like my Mom before me I have chronically cold hands. I think that helps distract people from what I'm doing.
    But really it's a matter of practice, practice and more practice. And some people are just born with a good touch.
  10. by   Katnip
    Adria, oranges aren't too bad a comparison, but every person's skin thickness and texture is different. The first time I ever injected a person, the needle bounced right off her arm. Thought I'd die, but she didn't notice. I'm not the only person this has happened to, either.
  11. by   P_RN
    http://www.mrprotocols.com/sset/iv.html


    Take a look at this site. It's for starting an IV for an MRI so some of the equipment is not what is usually needed but it has GREAT PICTURES, and afterall a picture is worth a 1000 words.
  12. by   Tweety
    I don't want to Blueyes to think I'm stalking her, but I was going to say practice, practice, practice, and to take every opportunity to do an IV when you graduate or in your clinicals. Your school will teach you the techniques and then you just do it!

    I don't think there's anything as a "virtually painfree" experience when you are puncturing someone.

    Remember different people react differently. I've seen grown woman cry, shake and shiver BEFORE I even start to inject them. Others, like myself, don't bat an eye. Realize you might be causing pain and continue on.

    Good luck in school!
  13. by   SingingNurse2
    Keep them talking - you can't have a nice conversation and tense up at the same time.

    I worked my way through college as a phlebotomist and it really helps to learn the correct angle of insertion - I worked with a lab tech who would jab it in straight down and then dig around -she was scary!

close