where do old nurses go? - page 7

I am 56 years old and have been a nurse for 34 years. My body is wearing out from all the wear and tear over the years of nursing. So my question what is there for us old nurses? How do we figure... Read More

  1. by   burn out
    Quote from insightful
    We could string the Ativan into necklaces. Gum them when we need to. Does Ativan go with the Margaritas I plan to have served to me every afternoon? I hope the server is 21 years old, on steroids, and named Sven....and the uniform is a Speedo.....okay I plan to be a dirty old lady.
    how about valium salt blocks we can all gum on. You can have Sven, I'll take the Rocky type to carry me and tuck me into bed.
  2. by   91C_ARMYLPN
    Where do old nurses go??? There is a special place that St. Peter has set up for us...LOL...I am going to be 48 years old myself this coming April! After all of the tears we have wiped, the hands that we have held, and the comfort that we have provided, we do have place for us all.

    It's nursing paradise! No back pain, no shift work, no on call, no mandatory over time, and no backstabbing. Nice back and foot massages, every day is a vacation, and you are treated like a human being. Now that's worth looking forward to!
  3. by   oneLoneNurse
    I'm 50. My plan is to cut down my hours. I go for an interview with my local hospital which may be 1/2 mile away Tuesday. Its working 3:4 weekends per month with benefits.

    My other plan is to become a librarian. The program which I just started in January can be grueling. But, I see the reward as being pretty huge. I will most likely chose a medical library where I can use my years of nursing and love of computers.

    Good to plan for our old age. Working 40 hours on most nursing floors in your 60s is not a good plan in my books.
  4. by   Myxel67
    old nurses never die...

    they just pass their expiration date.
    their ivs just run out.
    their shift just ends.
    they become nursing school instructors.
  5. by   Myxel67
    If MHA means Master of Health Administration, why not use that as a springboard. Manage a home health agency. Work for a staffing agency. Be a nurse recruiter. You have lots of options, just learn how to market yourself.
  6. by   vablueyes
    I don't know about you guys, but I'm going to the islands, sipping cold adult beverages, and enjoying the warm sand between my toes, no malls, no barfing or pooping patients, no administrators dictating my every move....just peace and quiet. It may not last long, only until the $$ runs out, but I can hear the azur seas calling my name!!
  7. by   allantiques4me
    Quote from manettohillnurse
    I just had another thought. Be a nit picker. Seriously, with lice becoming more and more prevalent there are people who have started a business going to peoples' houses, treating anybody who has lice/nits. Some people will even clean the house and cars etc. One of my parents just had a woman in to do this and it cost her $500. There is real money to be made in this job and have seriously thought of doing this when I retire. There would be an initial overhead for printing cards and doing mailings to schools and an ad. in local newspapers. You would have the parents buy whatever treatment would be necessary and then you would go in and literally finish up by nit picking. This may gross a few of you out but think of the money to be made !!!!!!!!
    I have never heard of this,but I think it sounds ingenious!I mean it sounds gross,but you could put your hair up,and I dont believe lice is as contagious as we think sometimes.I have had to treat lice at our facility.I have personally witnessed that if a greasy substance comes in contact with the bugs,they die.I used to keep my little girls hair deep conditioned with coconut oil when I knew there was an outbreak at the school.It seemed to have worked.
  8. by   teeituptom
    The weather is nice, I, on my way to the golf course
  9. by   manettohillnurse
    I've had such a good laugh over the replies to the nursing home idea. However I've found some of the replies bitter sweet. We all seem to have worked very hard with sometimes very little recognition or rewards. How pitiful is that?
  10. by   lujological
    44 years nursing,30 of them doing nights-62 year old -while my feet kill me by the end of my 12 hours,only working 3 days a week with full benefits as eveing nurse manager in LTC is good.I do orders and paperwork from 6pm till 11:00 then i care for a 18 bed wing residents plus any supervisory things that come up.I get the best of both worlds as long as nothing crazy happens.one gripe i have is meetings that they want you to come to in the middle of your sleep time.I hope to work a couple more years then retire and become cruise ship bum.Now there would be a job- nurse on cruise ship!!on one cruise went on my husband made use of infirmery and nurse told me her days are only 4-6hours long and she can get off in all ports visited and no major medical problems.Good luck finding a perfect job!!most of us have so much experience we could do anything!!
  11. by   sandyis_me
    Quote from insightful
    I am 56 years old and have been a nurse for 34 years. My body is wearing out from all the wear and tear over the years of nursing. So my question what is there for us old nurses? How do we figure out something else to do where the money is decent? Any suggestions?
    Thanks

    i'm just wondering if I'm crazy? I am 47 years old and am seriously considering going back to school to be a nurse. Am i too old? Is it too hard physically? your experienced input would really be appreciated.Thanks
  12. by   Sunflowerinsc
    WHERE DO OLD NURSES GO? Well, this old nurse just gets up and goes to work. Tried retirment one weekend,didn't like it,went back to work on the next Monday!!!!!!
  13. by   Sunflowerinsc
    WHERE DO OLD NURSES GO? Well, this old nurse just gets up and goes to work.Did retire one weekend,didn't like it,went back to work on the next Monday!!!!!!

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