Where can I get male only patients? - page 4

Im a male CNA and I've worked In a facility where males were not even allowed to have female residents. If there were females in the assignment they would swap them for a male with a female CNA. ... Read More

  1. by   applewhitern
    It isn't that unusual. I have worked in a large hospital that did not allow the nursing assistants to take care of the opposite sex. The female nursing assistants took care of the females, and the males took care of the males. Never seemed to be a problem. I can't believe you guys find that odd. Many females prefer a female assistant, especially when placing a urinary cath or something. No reason to not accommodate them.
  2. by   macawake
    Quote from applewhitern
    It isn't that unusual. I have worked in a large hospital that did not allow the nursing assistants to take care of the opposite sex. The female nursing assistants took care of the females, and the males took care of the males. Never seemed to be a problem.
    Does that mean that the hospital also didn't allow opposite-sex OB/Gyn's and urologists or were nether-region physicians of the opposite sex deemed acceptable? I suspect I know the answer to that but I'm asking because I'm genuinely curious to find out if different rules apply to different professions, despite the body parts being the same.


    Quote from applewhitern
    I can't believe you guys find that odd. Many females prefer a female assistant, especially when placing a urinary cath or something. No reason to not accommodate them.
    I agree there's no reason not to accomodate patients.

    Personally, I find it odd for two reasons. First, it's something that doesn't exist in my country. While patients are always free to choose their caregiver, all employees are hired to be able to take care of all patients. Second, it must put a massive strain on whoever does the scheduling. If all staff can only care for ~50% of the patient population, you always have to make sure that staff gender mix is roughly equal to patient gender mix, on any given shift. Seeing as how the gender mix might change from day to day and it might not be possible to reschedule staff according to gender on short notice, I guess that on some days female patients get good care, and on others it's the men's turn. CNA Bob calls in sick and CNA Sue is available to cover that shift... Nope, doesn't work. Need a male replacement (assuming there's no male nurse on duty either), or the male patients will have to spend the whole shift in soiled briefs...
  3. by   nehneh14
    Just as I don't believe that pharmacists should be able to refuse to sell Plan B due to religious beliefs, I don't believe health care providers should be allowed to pick and chose for whom they provide care based on religious beliefs. (That includes Catholic hospitals if they're getting government funding, but that's another issue, I suppose.) If your religion requires you to shun half of the population because of what does or does not dangle between their legs, you need to stay out of healthcare. Time for everyone to evolve.
  4. by   S7ud3n7_Nur53
    Have you looked into home health? I have seen many job postings for male-only CNAs
  5. by   callinshotz
    If healthcare is where you heart and soul are at, I'd say get creative. Many people have listed quite a few options on here for you. However, I think its also a great option to seek employment in a different field. I certainly would relieve the stress of finding something that fits your beliefs. I hope you find something that doesn't make you compromise your beliefs. It's just may be better to avoid this field all together. Especially as a CNA. Little investment made and there are a plethora of other things you could do with half the headache.
  6. by   Orion81
    Quote from NurseCard
    I do not think it is ridiculous, myself. Truly, interacting with an unclothed
    female might be strictly forbidden in the OP's religion, regardless of any
    situation, except as mentioned before, a dire life threatening emergency.
    Yeah, and that might have been fine and dandy if he had left it at that..."for religious reasons..."
    I would have respected that.

    But, he didn't leave it at that. He continued to juuust almost try to push his beliefs on the rest of us by stating how ridiculous it is for one gender to care for another when the same is occurring on the other side of the curtain. THAT, I took as judgement on those of us who do not share his beliefs.
  7. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Look I respect everybody's beliefs but those beliefs don't become everybody else's problem. It up to the individual to craft a lifestyle that is in line with those beliefs. If I was a strict Muslim I probably wouldn't work in a bacon factory. If I was a devout Mormon I wouldn't own a strip joint...

    If my beliefs didn't allow me to help women I may not want to work in a healthcare setting.... Everything doesn't always go together
  8. by   elkpark
    Quote from SpankedInPittsburgh
    Look I respect everybody's beliefs but those beliefs don't become everybody else's problem. It up to the individual to craft a lifestyle that is in line with those beliefs. If I was a strict Muslim I probably wouldn't work in a bacon factory. If I was a devout Mormon I wouldn't own a strip joint...

    If my beliefs didn't allow me to help women I may not want to work in a healthcare setting.... Everything doesn't always go together
    Which is exactly why the OP is asking for suggestions about where he might find a healthcare setting with all male clients, and they do exist. He's not asking other work settings to accommodate his beliefs; he's looking for a existing setting that accords with his beliefs.
  9. by   HBetz
    Try prison.
  10. by   JudiB4004
    GO to the VA where the patients are mostly males. They do have female patients but they are a relatively small portion of the census.
  11. by   AbstracRN2B
    But you are than doing the exact thing you don't like, imposing your values. Culture sensitivity is something that is currently emerging in our nation, if you feel something doesn't go against what is morally acceptable to you, who are you to than impose that value on someone else. I had a gay patient that refused care from female aides, it made things difficult yes but that's what he wanted. If this persons religion is important to them , just as is caring for others even if it is just males, who are you to tell them to evolve and find another profession. Cultural sensitivity applies to patients as well as workers, as everyone will not always have the same beliefs, that doesn't negate their beliefs and make them deserving of ridicule.
  12. by   BSNbeDONE
    I am just curious as to whether or not, on DAY ONE, the OP was told that there would be individuals from all walks of life, including females, that he'd have to provide care for even if it went against his personal preferences. After certification, he is surely presented with an anti-discrimination form of some sort requiring his signature. Did not the instructors tell the class that having biases for any reason would make for a long and difficult job search?

    I mean, in simply looking around the class of CNA hopefuls, did you see more females than males, and did it not register that you might find it difficult to find a facility that served only one specific population based on sex? Did this question ever surface before you had invested time and dollars into this certification?

    I remember way back when I was an LPN student, we had orderlies who were only allowed to care for male patients. That was during the days of glass IV bottles, stainless-steel needles that remained after IV insertion, and morphine-for-the-terminally-ill-only usage. Those days are long gone. As for religion, to each his or her own. But to hold fast to a male-only assignment in healthcare is to pretty-much create your own dead-end job in a field loaded with endless advancement opportunities. To go further in healthcare, such as to become licensed as a nurse, you will be required to care for all individuals. Even as a supervisor, you would have to be competent to perform the duties of all of your subordinates...that includes inserting Foley catheters into female patients and doing anything else that females would need and doing it regularly on a non-emergent basis.

    Several posters have suggested the VA. This would not necessarily be a viable option because the VA cannot (should not) discriminate. If they allow you to choose male-only veterans to care for, they would have to do the same for the female employees, and as mentioned, there are very few female veterans at the VA. I would say that your issue with finding a predominately male-patient population to serve in the 'real world' would be exactly the same with female CNAs looking for females-only in the VA system.

    The VA has been under scrutiny for some time now for shady practices and cover-ups. If you list ANY reason why you may not be able to perform ALL of the duties of the job and to hire you would mean to create an atmosphere of discrimination against others (CNAs and nurses are pulled to other units daily...you will not be exempt to this), you may find yourself still searching the want-ads. This is just my opinion.

    Now, I just have to ask. Why on earth would you choose a profession with a strong female presence on both sides of the bed if you don't want to provide care for them? It makes no sense to me that an individual would deliberately place himself or herself in such a position, especially in today's world where everyone expects to be cared for regardless of what their nationality, religious beliefs, or sexual preferences are. In healthcare, you will find that it is more about the paying customer, i.e. THE PATIENT, and rarely about the person delivering the care to that customer. Did you not know this before choosing healthcare? As a CNA, your choice could not possibly have been motivated by dollars.

    Your best bet is home health through an agency that offers 1:1 ratios where you can have more of a choice in the assignments you accept. Again, just my opinion...and my very best advice.
  13. by   SpankedInPittsburgh
    Certainly we must be culturally sensitive to the needs of our patients. It is a cornerstone of taking care of the whole patient. If a patient has religious beliefs that they cannot be touched by a member of the other sex we need to try to accommodate their needs when at all possible. However, we as care providers can't expect out patients to reciprocate. After all they are in our care and not the other way around. Once again I hope this guy finds a place that only takes care of men but in 2017 (except for prison & then a woman who is a guard or a visitor may need help) I have no idea where that would be. Can you imagine this scenario a woman patient asking for help and a male care provider refusing based on his beliefs. It raises the question of why he is there if not to help all the patients?

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