when are you no longer considered a new grad?

  1. Just curious as to when one is no longer considered a new grad? I graduated last May. I still feel like there are so many things that I do not know. I was also talking to a fellow co-worker of mine who is at about the year mark and she said that there are still a lot of things that she doesn't know either, mostly from lack of exposure. Although I feel like I have learned more in the last 6 months than I did in 2 years of nursing classes. Just looking for opinions!
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   PANurseRN1
    Seven months isn't much time. It takes at least a year or two just to get your basics.
  4. by   cardiacRN2006
    Hmm. Good question. I guess I would no longer consider myself a new grad after 1 year. I'd still call my self a new nurse, just not a new grad. Kinda like how you are only a newlywed for a year...

    I agree that I feel like I've learned so much in the past 6 months too!
  5. by   suzy253
    I'm a new grad/new nurse too and agree with learning more things in the past six months than 3 years of school. Amazing.
  6. by   banditrn
    Quote from colleennurse
    Just curious as to when one is no longer considered a new grad? I graduated last May. I still feel like there are so many things that I do not know. I was also talking to a fellow co-worker of mine who is at about the year mark and she said that there are still a lot of things that she doesn't know either, mostly from lack of exposure. Although I feel like I have learned more in the last 6 months than I did in 2 years of nursing classes. Just looking for opinions!
    When I was a 'new-grad' at nite on a med-surg floor, I worked with a nurse who had been there for 3 1/2 years, and she just seemed to know everything! I remember thinking that when I was there as long as she was, maybe I'd know 'everything', too!

    Many years later I thought of that and realized I STILL didn't know it all, and there were many things left to learn!
  7. by   TazziRN
    Ohsomany years ago, when there used to be one graduating class per year, "new grad" status was held by all new grads until the next class graduated.......generally June to June.
  8. by   RNperdiem
    When are your new grad days over? When newer nurses look to you for advice, when your co-workers no longer need to lend you that extra help and support needed for new grads-you are now expected to pull your weight. When you have memorized the phone numbers for pharamacy, dietary, and X-ray. The doctors will know your name. The days no longer seem overwhelming.
  9. by   RNsRWe
    Since it's now December, those of us who graduated in May are no longer referred to as "new grads", but as "new nurses". Exception is for those who still have "GN" after their names (no license yet). Makes sense to me!
  10. by   AdelaideChic
    Where I am working, in Australia, we do a 1 year program as a Grad Registered nurse, then we are employed as a Registered Nurse... so for us its pretty obvious when that first year is over - the 4 weeks annual leave at the end! Its also a different name badge :spin:
    However, if a RN chooses to work in a nursing home after graduation, they will still be generally required to do the grad program in the hospital before being apply to apply as a RN.
  11. by   AfloydRN
    When you are able to function w/ minimal intervention from other RN's. When you are able to hold your own w/ MD's and pt's families and do so w/ a smile. When you can troubleshoot your patient and ward off potential problems before they become one. And when you know WHEN to ask for help when you can't figure something out on your own. Humility is a large part of nursing.
  12. by   Tweety
    I think the magic number is a year.

    However, after one year that doesn't make you an expert nurse, so don't expect so much from yourself. You're going to be learning and growing every day for years to come. I've been at it a while and some days I feel like the biggest dope and I lean on the new grads "what did you learn about............."

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