What's with the chip on your shoulder? - page 4

I was in the hospital visiting a friend who just had a baby. As I was walking by the nurses station in postpardum, things seemed to be quiet. I decided to stop and say "Hello". ONE nurse (mind you... Read More

  1. by   Q.
    Originally posted by Grace Oz
    As for the post about protecting patients casenotes while writing them etc in the station....just goes to show how much we need a seperate room where we can document & store those confidential notes??!...
    Yes we do. But it also goes to show the obvious lack of power, control and influence that nurse's possess. If it were up to ANY of us, we would definitely have a more confidential space to chart and give report, however, I still think patients/family walking into/behind the nurse's station is a definite no-no and should be quite obviously so.

    I'm sorry, but I find that inexcusable.
  2. by   boobaby42
    Yin/Yang. Good and bad exist in every setting.
  3. by   fedupnurse
    I've seen a lot of nurses come and go over the years. Most were great with visitors and families and a handful were not. I don't understand those that are rude, there really is no excuse for it. When I am in the presence of a rude colleague, I attempt to help the person who is catching the attitude in whatever way I can. Again, if managers and administrators would do their jobs effectively and start weeding people like this out...The rude ones I have worked with have never been reprimanded in any way, shape, or form!
    Good luck to you!
  4. by   Agnus
    Originally posted by fedupnurse
    Again, if managers and administrators would do their jobs effectively and start weeding people like this out...The rude ones I have worked with have never been reprimanded in any way, shape, or form!
    Good luck to you!
    I am not a manager or adiministrator but could be someday. I am trying to learn something so please take this in that spirit. How do you suggest the weeding be done?

    I am thinking we don't always know until after a person is hired that they are rude. Firing is difficult, I think particularly due to labor laws. I think employers always have the fear or a suit of wrongful termination in the backs of thier minds. I don't have any ideas on this. Do you? :kiss
  5. by   DAISY MAE 1
    I donot think that nurse really has any good excuses. She is
    getting paid to do a job and do it well. I just stepped down from
    15 years of leadership, and I think no one has a monopoly on
    stress or a reason to lash out at someone. I could have sworn,
    cried at least daily, but I made a choice not to. My employees
    were very sad to see me leave but I had empowered them.
    Even so, they still had to be responsible for themselves and their
    attitudes. Managers are human too, and we can only do so much
    and the rest is up to the employee. I empowered, disciplined when I had to, but eventually burned out because of the demands. I saw my attitude slipping and knew it was time for
    a change. Now I am hoping to be one great staff nurse, and to
    really give great hands on care! I have seen both sides of the
    fence, and neither one is easy. I have a choice, and I plan to
    show up at work, be real (but kind and decent) to my co-workers
    and to give patients the best care I can because that is what
    nursing is about. I might be in their shoes one day. Daisy
  6. by   moonshadeau
    I think that if I overheard one nurse saying to another that the day sucked and she hated her job, I would just think that the nurse was venting. I know very little family members that really care about all the crap that nurses go through daily. I am not rude to other people but sometimes things are said in the wrong context. I vent all the time. But I love my job. (ok, most of the time. )

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What's with the chip on your shoulder?