What's a magnet hospital???

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    Hello all.

    Hope you're having a great day!


    I have read a couple of threads mentioning a "magnet hospital." What is that? How is that different than a regular hospital? And how do you know if your hospital is a Magnet?

    (I think it was a "hospital"....It was a magnet something, but I think hospital.)

    TIA.

    ~C
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  3. 13 Comments so far...

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    Hello! I work at a magnet hospital...it's a measure of nursing quality ftom the ANCC. It just basically says that the patient outcomes are good, the nurses are mostly satisfied with their jobs (lower turnover rates), good communication between nurses and others, etc. There's something in there about education too...like encouraging nurses to continue their education or something like that. They say that it means that the hospital values nursing, they will work with you, let nurses be decision-makers, etc. I may be leaving something out, but who knows. And I remember someone from our magnet comittee telling us that "magnet" means that it "draws nurses to it and keeps them there". I don't know if that's actually where they got the term or not, but that's how it was described to us.

    Get this - my hospital spent tons of money getting magnet status, and then just a couple of months after we got it (and not even 2 months into the new fiscal year), they said, "we're sorry, but we are millions of dollars in the hole right now, so you will have to work at 103% productivity and a person short now and then". (We are a not-for-profit organization, but money still matters.) Magnet. Yeah.
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    A hospital certified by the ANCC, after their inspections, that signifies nursing excellence. The nurses (supposedly) at the facility have a low turnover rate, are better satisfied, have a say in decision making in patient care, etc. There are not many hospitals that have magnet certification compared to the number of hospitals around. I have worked at a facility during the application, interview process, and after certification. It was a good facility to work for, but the nurses there had the same issues as everywhere else. Understaffing, didn't feel that managment listened at times, etc.
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    Here's a link that can better help you understand Magnet. This is also the website that shows how individual nurses can get specialty certification.

    http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/


    Quote from miko014
    Hello! I work at a magnet hospital...it's a measure of nursing quality ftom the ANCC. It just basically says that the patient outcomes are good, the nurses are mostly satisfied with their jobs (lower turnover rates), good communication between nurses and others, etc. There's something in there about education too...like encouraging nurses to continue their education or something like that. They say that it means that the hospital values nursing, they will work with you, let nurses be decision-makers, etc. I may be leaving something out, but who knows. And I remember someone from our magnet comittee telling us that "magnet" means that it "draws nurses to it and keeps them there". I don't know if that's actually where they got the term or not, but that's how it was described to us.

    Get this - my hospital spent tons of money getting magnet status, and then just a couple of months after we got it (and not even 2 months into the new fiscal year), they said, "we're sorry, but we are millions of dollars in the hole right now, so you will have to work at 103% productivity and a person short now and then". (We are a not-for-profit organization, but money still matters.) Magnet. Yeah.
    Please TELL THEM!!! Magnet status is a PRIVILEGE, not a right. It is given, and it can be taken away. Here's the survey link on the ANCC website:

    http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet/snsurvey.html
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    That was just an example of how magnet is a nice idea, especially on paper, but doesn't always work out quite that way. Overall, I don't have *too* much to complain about...at least, not compared to some other things I have read on here! And don't worry, I think they learned their lesson when a bunch of their advanced practice RNs quit d/t fear of being fired. But I didn't tell you the reason that they are in the hole - a group of cardiologists pulled out to go to a competing hospital after the other hospital offered to buy them new equipment...also, we were the largest cardiac referral center in the state, but now the little hospitals are starting to do their own heart caths and stuff, so we are losing money in that. Too bad they just built a new heart hospital (which is INCREDIBLY nice!)! The building I work in was built in the '60s, and it...leaves a lot to be desired. For example - the walls are solid concrete, so they cannot wire for computers...we had to wait until they figured out a way for us to go wireless (very difficult to get reception of the wireless signal in some parts of the hospital). Eek, long-winded, sorry!!

    I've mentioned this before, but we feel like the hospital is magnet, but they pay a lot more attention to some units over others. I'm heme/onc, and our cacer program keeps making all the lists, they say congratulations!, and then they go redo newer floors. Never mind that our wallpaper is peeling off the walls, the walls themselves are cracked, the bathroom doors are not wide enough to get a walker through (I'm sure JCAHO would approve of that, it's very safe! ), the toilets are so low to the ground that I would probably be uncomfortable on them, the floors are faded, etc...sadly, I could go on. I understand that we are just one small part of the cancer program, but give us a little break! The only thing people like about the floor is that we have painted ceiling tiles. We used to have a program where art volunteers would come in and help people do that. They have eliminated that program (too expensive to have a full-time art therapist to coordinate it), but they still do let pts paint occasionally. I'm pretty sure we are the only unit in the whole hospital (we have 38 beds...the hospital has over 1000) to do that.
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    Hey everyone!! I work for a Manget Hospital and let me tell you it is WONDERFUL!!!
    Basicaly it means that the hopital has one of the highest repected nursing staff. That the hospital vaules their nurses and treats them well, and that nurses enjoy working there. It also shows that the the hospital encourages higher eduaction,. such as adavancing from an LPN to an RN, RN to BSN, BSN to Masters, RN to PA-C, PA-C to MD, or specilazation in a particular area of medicne, such as an RN with advanced tranning and certification in Med/Surg, or Critical Care or any other area of healthcare. It also shows that the hospital has a better then ecxpected patient outcome.
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    See our thread: Magnet Nursing Info
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    Quote from CNAinPA
    Hey everyone!! I work for a Manget Hospital and let me tell you it is WONDERFUL!!!
    Basicaly it means that the hopital has one of the highest repected nursing staff. That the hospital vaules their nurses and treats them well, and that nurses enjoy working there. It also shows that the the hospital encourages higher eduaction,. such as adavancing from an LPN to an RN, RN to BSN, BSN to Masters, RN to PA-C, PA-C to MD, or specilazation in a particular area of medicne, such as an RN with advanced tranning and certification in Med/Surg, or Critical Care or any other area of healthcare. It also shows that the hospital has a better then ecxpected patient outcome.

    Really? I work for a magnet hospital and haven't seen any of that!
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    http://www.health.qld.gov.au/pahospital/magnet/

    Well I live in Australia and work at the above hospital, which is one of the first Australian MAGNET hospitals (I think) - its a great idea in theory, and I'm sure it works in hospitals in the US, but I sadly haven't seen any differences ....

    That could just be the cynic in me talking though :uhoh21:
  12. 0
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    Here's a link that can better help you understand Magnet. This is also the website that shows how individual nurses can get specialty certification.

    http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/




    Please TELL THEM!!! Magnet status is a PRIVILEGE, not a right. It is given, and it can be taken away. Here's the survey link on the ANCC website:

    http://www.nursingworld.org/ancc/magnet/snsurvey.html

    We had Magnet status for five years, and at renewal time, we lost it because lack of improvement. Once you get Magnet status, you can't stay the same, you have to improve. It's not an easy honor to get.


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