What would you look for in a nursing instructor? - page 2

So I'll be starting my master's this fall, Nursing Educator. This is strange because I really hated nursing school, although I didn't really hate the instructors, just the way the whole thing was... Read More

  1. by   Renee' Y-Y
    The only thing I have to add is be prepared for the pretentiousness of many PhD nursing professors. They look at MSN's as second-class citizens...but of course we MSN's look at them as pretentious fossils. Personally, I think your students will be a breeze compared to some of the politics among the professors. I lasted 2 semesters...as a part-time-clinical faculty!!
  2. by   mattsmom81
    My favorite instructors in nursing school were the ones who had actually done bedside nursing within the last 10 yrs. My worst were the lecture/ ivory tower types that droned on and on about theory and had no earthly idea how to apply it in the 'real' world..

    Gotta add I learned 'something' from all my instructors...even if it was how I did NOT want to be when I turned out. :chuckle
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Feb 28, '04
  3. by   orrnlori
    Thanks for all your replies. I have heard back from supervisors that my student nurses have enjoyed their preceptorship with me. I hope that's not the students just stating what they think the supervisor wants to hear.

    I have always loved working with students, whether nursing or medicine. I started thinking about teaching pretty quickly while I was a teaching assistance in anatomy and physiology while I was completing my nursing program. My love of it grew once I got my first few students under my belt at the hospital. Soon, every time I turned around, I was given a student to take care of, even during busy surgical cases. And every summer for the last 4, I've been involved in SNAP (Student Nurses Apprenticeship Program) at the hospital, where I get one student for 3 months in the summer full time. Each time, I've turned out a nurse ready to work as a very competent circulator, if they chose that route on passing their board.

    I hope I've chosen the right route for my master's. I think this board will really help me stay in touch with other students and nurses, after all, I'll be one myself for the next 3 years (student, that is).

    Thank you again for your kind attention.
  4. by   VickyRN
    I am a relatively new nursing instructor in a small community college. One thing that really took me off guard was horizontal violence that is practiced among nursing faculty.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Feb 29, '04
  5. by   orrnlori
    What is horizontal violence? Please enlighten me, never heard that term and not sure what you are talking about.
  6. by   NICUbabyRN
    When I went to school I had one instructor who made all the diference in the world. She was truely passionate about nursing. She also was still working the ED occasionally. So, she was up to date with all that is happening in nursing. She was a patient advocate. But more importantly to the students was that she was a student advocate. No, question was considered stupid. She inspired us. She inspired many of us to go on with with schooling.
  7. by   VickyRN
    Quote from orrnlori
    What is horizontal violence? Please enlighten me, never heard that term and not sure what you are talking about.
    Two very good websites:
    http://www.acegraphics.com.au/articles/hastie02.html
    http://www.bullyonline.org/workbully/amibeing.htm

    More common term for this unfortunate phenomenon is "nurses eating their young" (this is so pervasive throughout nursing, I'm sure you've heard of it).
    A more scholarly definition is quoted from the first article above:
    "Horizontal violence is hostile and aggressive behaviour by individual or group members towards another member or groups of members of the larger group."
    You often see this behavior within oppressed groups in society--often a manifestation of self-hatred and low-self esteem. The violence is turned inward. A perverted way of making oneself feel or look good (at least temporarily) by destroying someone else.

    There was one faculty member in particular who was out to destroy me professionally and made my life a living hell at the school for a whole year until she (thankfully) left for "greener" pastures. (I still haven't figured out why she picked me as her target.) Another faculty member left in a fit of "angst" because she was passed over for a promotion which she thought she deserved. This particular faculty member has a lot of sway in the local and extralocal "nurse community" and has been undermining our nursing program ever since she resigned. Nurses at a certain clinical site have been openly hostile towards our instructors and students because of this former instructor's influence.
    Last edit by VickyRN on Feb 29, '04
  8. by   mattsmom81
    Sad isn't it Vickie...no wonder the backstabbing in nursing is so prevalent...it is witnessed and experienced by the students just starting out...and even perpetrated by some instructors, sadly enough. Thanks for being a positive role model to our young students. The trick is keeping the right attitude and not getting sucked into the ugliness some nurses propogate, isn't it? Its a real challenge out there in many hospital environments, where management fosters a dog eat dog mentality from the top down.
  9. by   VickyRN
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Sad isn't it Vickie...no wonder the backstabbing in nursing is so prevalent...it is witnessed and experienced by the students just starting out...and even perpetrated by some instructors, sadly enough. Thanks for being a positive role model to our young students. The trick is keeping the right attitude and not getting sucked into the ugliness some nurses propogate, isn't it? Its a real challenge out there in many hospital environments, where management fosters a dog eat dog mentality from the top down.
    Yes, it was a very difficult situation. One that tried my soul and left a lot of wounds. Particularly on the clinical site, the nurses were SO nasty that the students could not help but notice (like having a clinical in a snake pit). It has backfired on the hospital (which is desperately short of nurses). Not surprisingly, very few of our students want to work there.
    I am not perfect, but I am trying very hard to be a good role model. And I tell the students that every experience they encounter, whether good or bad, is an opportunity to learn and to grow. They have learned a lot about 'horizontal violence' from their experience on that clinical floor.
    And actually, the atmosphere at our school now is MOST collegial and supportive, since the other instructor left.
  10. by   Babe
    Keep us posted on your book, lots of instructors I know need something real to go by!!
  11. by   Babe
    Keep us posted on your book, lots of instructors I know need something real to go by!!
  12. by   orrnlori
    I made a statement in another post that I had never experienced such poor peer to peer relationships until I came to nursing and someone said that it is in all professions. I still disagree, I never never experienced it in my 20 years as a banker before coming to nursing and I worked in many companies and banks both large and small. I have yet to figure out why this is.

    Everytime I get a student nurse for a day, I have to shield her from several nurses that I know will start the "run for your life" needling and condescending comments. Are we truly that unhappy and maladusted as a profession, as people? Then there are those who are perfect and have distain for all others, another anomoly as I've yet to met the perfect human being.

    I remember starting as a nurse and getting report from the ICU nurses, whose conversations dripped with contempt because I was just a little trauma step down nurse. Did they not understand that they were about to hand off to me the very patient that they were so sanctimonious about?
    Then upon coming to the OR, I found that some NICU nurses and PICU nurses would absolutely refuse to hand off their patient to the OR until the very last minute because we weren't NICU and PICU nurses. Does nursing somehow attract a group of people that can't play well with others? I think I will try to find some research on this phenomenon as I see it repeated far too often for it to be an urban legend.

    Obviously it sounds like it sometimes starts with the instructors. What a shame.
  13. by   traumaRUs
    Well - I have to say its so awesome for you to ask these questions! What a great attitude - I'm sure you'll be a great educator! I'm finishing my BSN in May 04 and then am going into an MSN program also. I was an LPN for a couple of years and have been an RN for 12 years. About my only comment is that I don't remember any instructor either negatively or positively.

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