What would YOU Do?

  1. Hey all,

    I need some career advice. I have recently accepted a position at a hospital but I have not started on the unit yet, just completed general and nursing orientation. HOWEVER, I have received another job offer from another hospital in the area that includes a little more money and a nice sign on bonus! The positions are on the same type of unit. Should I jump ship to take the 2nd offer and money or stay where I am at???? Thanks
    •  
  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   TazziRN
    You've already accepted an offer, I'd say you're stuck.
  4. by   santhony44
    If you hadn't started at all yet, then I'd say it would be, well, not great but maybe OK to decline the first and accept the second offer.

    However, since you have been through some of your orientation, I agree with Tazzi, you're stuck.

    When you're tempted to kick yourself, consider that you may actually be in the better place. Sometimes more money + sign-on bonus = bad working conditions (they have to pay more to get people).
  5. by   xoyw01
    I don't think you are stuck. The professional thing to do is go back to offer #1 and give them the opportunity to match offer #2. You need to make the best decision for yourself.
  6. by   TazziRN
    Unfortunately, XO, even though she has not started on the unit she has been hired. She accepted their offer already. It would not be kosher for her to come at them so soon after and say, "I want more."

    She can take the other job if she really wants to, but to quit the current place like that would not be a good thing to do.
  7. by   MIA-RN
    I think that you can choose to take the new position, but realize that you are likely burning a bridge at the current hospital. All things considered, you have to follow your heart but be careful of what is left behind. If you choose to go to the second job, try to shadow, speak to some nurses there....in other words, be really really sure of the place before you go to it; like I said, you'll be burning your bridge at the other place.
  8. by   llg
    It would definitely be unethical to ask your current employer for money now. You agreed to do a certain job for specified compensation. Based on your agreement to work for them, they paid you while they provided you with valuable education. For you to "welch on the deal" now by asking for more money (or by leaving) would make you look very bad -- and give you a bad reputation that might come back to haunt you in the future.

    I would only consider giving myself a bad reputation under extreme circumstances -- for example, if you found out that your current employer had lied to you about the job, or had done something that was very wrong, or turned out to be a horrible place to work, etc. Unless your current employer has done something wrong, it is very wrong for you to take their money (training) and run.
  9. by   RNperdiem
    Beware of places offering sign on bonuses, it is often a sign of a unit unable to keep nurses.
    If a little extra money is calling to you, there is often the opportunity for a little overtime at work. Where I work, there is critical staffing pay-a bonus paid in addition to regular wages for staff willing to work overtime in certain units.
  10. by   suanna
    You haven't started the job yet- "I've reconsidered the position and have decided to accept an offer elswhere" is all that is required, but be warned, there may be
    a reason the other hospital is offering a sign on bonus and higher wages. We had a simular competition with a local hospital: sign on bonus, great wages, reportedly great working conditions. 5 staff left, giving up years of seniority and a position that they were fairly happy with. Only one stayed with the new job- constant floating, obnoxious medical staff, ineffective management, doubled assignments no autonomy.... There are some things money can't buy. I would advise you to talk to nurses working at both units before you decide. If the units and working conditions are comparable take the money. Even if you had started the new position all you owe them is 2weeks notice. If hospitals want nurses they are going to have to pay the area standard and offer respectable working conditions to recruit and keep them.
  11. by   TRAMA1RN
    you owe your employer nothing. If you don't have a union they can fire you because they don't like your shoes, having been burnt by at will employer, look out for number 1, but be sure that is really what you want.
  12. by   James Huffman
    Quote from llg
    It would definitely be unethical to ask your current employer for money now. You agreed to do a certain job for specified compensation. Based on your agreement to work for them, they paid you while they provided you with valuable education. For you to "welch on the deal" now by asking for more money (or by leaving) would make you look very bad -- and give you a bad reputation that might come back to haunt you in the future.

    I would only consider giving myself a bad reputation under extreme circumstances -- for example, if you found out that your current employer had lied to you about the job, or had done something that was very wrong, or turned out to be a horrible place to work, etc. Unless your current employer has done something wrong, it is very wrong for you to take their money (training) and run.
    Why would it be "unethical" to ask for more money? They're big boys and girls, and they can say no, if they are so inclined. But showing them a firm offer from the other place just might induce them to pay more. It cannot hurt, and might get this nurse better money from the deal.

    The current hospital hasn't provided "education" (unless there's something I'm missing); they've done orientation.

    Having said that, nurses should know exactly what they're getting into with a sign-on bonus. A hospital doesn't do that unless they have trouble getting nurses without it, and one has to ask why they can't: is it bad working conditions, a bad physical facility, a very bad neighborhood, or what?

    Also, other posters have mentioned burning bridges. This is correct. Burning bridges is not necessarily a bad thing (some bridges need burning ... :spin but it's unlikely you can go back once burned.

    Another option would be to take the second offer, resign from the first, work out a notice, and be gone. Hospital # 1 wouldn't be excited, but would probably not be too unhappy.
  13. by   GilaRRT
    Go where you want. I am not sure about burning a bridge over taking a job or backing out of an offer, even after accepting. Hospitals are like WalMarts for health care providers. People are entering and exiting through the doors all day long. Some places cannot keep nurses for more than a few days. In addition, we all know that there are many nurses out there who hop from hospital to hospital in order to get a better deal, and they do this all day long. Give it a while and you would most likely have a chance at getting a job with the hospital in question.

    While this may be uncouth, nursing is such a...challenging career, I see why people do it. This is one of the reasons I currently travel.
  14. by   SICU Queen
    If you're sure you want the second job, then go for it. I'd make it a point to tour that unit and speak with some of the nurses first, though. Sign-on bonuses CAN be an indicator of problems, but not always.

    One is never "stuck" when it comes to jobs in nursing! Just be sure to be as professional as you can be about it, and it wouldn't hurt to see if the first job would be willing to pony up the $$ to match in order to keep you.

close