what to say at an interview..

  1. Hello all I have my first RN interview next week I am looking for advice on what to say (what they want to hear) or what ever makes me sound like I have done this (interviews) before and im not scared S***less.

    I figure enough of you out there have interviewed or been the interviewer, so any advice would be apprieciated.

    Thanks!!
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Shapeless
    Be yourself and be honest. Most interviewers would much prefer that and always have a way of catching you out if your not.
  4. by   newgrad2004
    Im not talking about not being honest Im talking about the jargon they say to make me sound more proffessional.




    Quote from Shapeless
    Be yourself and be honest. Most interviewers would much prefer that and always have a way of catching you out if your not.
  5. by   emily_rn_03
    Some interviews use behavioral type questions to find out if you are indeed what they are looking for. Some examples of those questions include.. tell me about a time when you were faced with an ethical dilemma? or Tell me about a time when you needed to prioritize? or Tell me about a time when you did not get along with a coworker? What did you do with that? How did it work out for you? These are examples that I had for two of my interviews. Just try to think of past experiences so you are prepared to give examples in an interview.
    Good Luck!!!
  6. by   newgrad2004
    Thanks Emily! Those are the things I would like to be a little more prepared to answer, so I dont say "uhhhhh, let me think" arg sounds horrible. The only problem Is since I havent worked in the hospital except a minimal amount doing NAa I cant think of an ethical issue that I was faced with...
    arg except one, and I doubt I should mention it.

    Once when I was an NA I observed a RN going into each room and asking about pain and a couple questions and then she went out and wrote up her full assessment. Since I was an NA and not an RN or a fulltime employee I didnt say anything at the time. I did however act a little "pissy" towards her for the first few hours because I was so upset this was the field Im going into and this was to me poor (to say the least) nursing. I was also upset to find she was also a charge nurse on another floor.

    But she was very helpful to me all day so I had to be nice eventually and she ended up giving me a complement later (i found out weeks later) to my supervisior. But that experience haunted me and I have since said something to so people at the hospital. But I was too afraid at the time to be involved in something before my career started. If I happen to work on same floor or near her I will say something. But how could I say I saw something unethical and did nothing? How would I respond to that? arg..
    I suppose I can try to think of something in my other jobs, but thats the only one I have seen in this field.

    any other advice anyone?




    Quote from emily_rn_03
    Some interviews use behavioral type questions to find out if you are indeed what they are looking for. Some examples of those questions include.. tell me about a time when you were faced with an ethical dilemma? or Tell me about a time when you needed to prioritize? or Tell me about a time when you did not get along with a coworker? What did you do with that? How did it work out for you? These are examples that I had for two of my interviews. Just try to think of past experiences so you are prepared to give examples in an interview.
    Good Luck!!!
  7. by   Shapeless
    Quote from newgrad2004
    Im not talking about not being honest Im talking about the jargon they say to make me sound more proffessional.

    Exactly my piont. It's no use using jargon you don't understand.
  8. by   newgrad2004
    I understand jargon, thanks for the help and vote of confidence.


    Quote from Shapeless
    Exactly my piont. It's no use using jargon you don't understand.
  9. by   zambezi
    One thing that I seem to get asked is: "Have you every disagreed with a superior, about what, and what did you do about it?" I also got asked what the hosptials five values were, which one I thought was most important and why (an unfortunate question if you don't know what the values of the hospital are...). I got asked what the nursing process was. I think that the best thing is just to be yourself, focus on your positive traits, and know a little bit about the hospital/position you are applying for. Have your own list of questions as well; IE: what are the staffing ratios, what is your new grad program like, how long is orientation, how many nurses are on the unit on X shift, etc. EmilyRN also mentioned some good points. IT is ok to not know things in an interview--you won't know everything in your new job...I think sometimes those doing the hiring want to see how you will react to a question you don't know an immediate answer too--Will you make something up? Will you admit you don't know the answer and seek assistance? Anyway...I think you will do fine, be yourself, have confidence, but don't be afriad to be nervous...I had my nursing manager tell me that she did not hire new grads that didn't admit that they weren't a little bit afraid, after all we are taking care of other people's lives. She did't want to hire someone that "knew it all" and wouldn't ask for help. So good luck!
    Last edit by zambezi on Mar 19, '04
  10. by   purplemania
    The interviewer knows not to expect experience from you. Jargon can be learned and is not expected either. What is expected is being clean, polite, have a copy of your resume and any other papers they may have requested, have a good phone number to contact you later (ask if they prefer cell phone or land line) and show a willingness to be a team player. For instance, if you start off with "I can't work weekends" "I have a family" (who doesn't?) "I can't work nights" "the reason my grades were poor in algebra is because the teacher didn't like me"---all those things sound immature. Listen, take notes and ask about patient to nurse ratios, what is policy on floating and will I be paid if I am not allowed to work a shift due to low census, what is policy on mandatory overtime, what is turnover rate for that nursing unit---things that make it sound like you have given thought to the interview. Relax. Just be nice.
  11. by   Shapeless
    Apologies if my post has offended you Newgrad 2004. That was not my intent, I was genuinely trying to help.

    I have seen many at interview who have came out with 'nursing jargon' such as autonomy, dynamic, holistic and when asked what they mean, have floundered like a fish out of water.

    Puprlemania and Zambezi are spot on with thier comments, if this is your first post, they wont expect experience. Just a willingness to learn, to be guided and able work in a team.

    Good luck
  12. by   newgrad2004
    Thank you all so much, these are things I want to consider and focus on. I havent ever interviewed for a Nursing position, only the NA job, and of course my last "career". But something about this field and the competition I wanted to be a little more prepared. So thats why I asked the questions. And thanks shameless too, I was indeed offended by your earlier posts. Im not an idiot really though hehe. If I didnt understand a word I would certainly look it up before using it. I know a lot of hospitals will use similar questions and because Im so nervous I wanted to be thinking of things that might be thrown out at me. If they are and Im nervous I dont want to blow it.
    By hearing these things you all tell me I can try to overcome some of my nerves by feeling more prepared for what I may face.

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