What to do

  1. Hello,
    I am sure this topic has been posted by unsure new grads before, but here it goes again! I will graduate in 9 weeks and I have no idea what I want to do!! It seems to me that all my classmates have their careers all planned out. What if I accept a position and hate it? Any advice?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   kewlnurse
    I think every new nurse sould do at least 6 months on a med surge floor of some type just to get the experience and feel for the job. Fourtnatly we live in a free country (than why does it cost soo much to live) and you can resign if you hate it.
  4. by   oramar
    Would you believe that many of your classmates who seem to be so sure of their plans will come to realize that they are not happy and change directions in the first year or two. If your approach is more tentative than your classmates you are most likely being more realistic. If you go into something saying I am not sure of this but I will try it will be easier to cut the ties and move on when it does not work out. On the other hand just imagine how pleasantly surprised you will be if your first choice turns out to be a good one.
  5. by   JennieBSN
    Originally posted by oramar:
    Would you believe that many of your classmates who seem to be so sure of their plans will come to realize that they are not happy and change directions in the first year or two. If your approach is more tentative than your classmates you are most likely being more realistic. If you go into something saying I am not sure of this but I will try it will be easier to cut the ties and move on when it does not work out. On the other hand just imagine how pleasantly surprised you will be if your first choice turns out to be a good one.
    Oramar hit the nail on the head. I thought I 'KNEW' also, and resigned after only 2 months! The hospital had a lot of internal openings, so I just picked a unit at random...three and a half years later, I'm still there...and LOVING it! Med/surg is a good starting point if you don't know where you want to go. You'll learn invaluable skills that you'll carry with you for the rest of your career. Good luck!
  6. by   prmenrs
    As a new grad, I loved just about every thing (peds and psych excepted!). So at my interview, I asked them what they had. She told me, and I said, "I'd like to try that one, I don't know very much about THAT!" Would you believe they still hired me!! What a do-do head!

    What do you like best as a student? Try that 1st! Then work your way around till you find your own personal niche.

    Best of luck to you.
  7. by   burger914
    Thank you for all the advice. I really enjoyed OB and my Psyche rotation, but I just don't know. I do know that the majority vote seems to be toward Med/Surg ( Not my favorite, but I understand that it is a valuable experience)
  8. by   hollykate
    Hey Burger,
    If you liked OB, and are considering MedSUrg- try getting into a special Women's floor. My friend went to one which is GYN oncology- she works with women with reproductive cancer, women who have had reproductive surgery, postpartum overflow, etc. It is a Medical surgical experience aimed at her goal- which is to be a midwife.
    Med Surg isn't as bad as it sounds- because so many of the Med Surg floors are sort of specialized now, Ortho floors, GI floors, Renal floors, etc. so look in that direction. and if you hate it, well, you can always switch- thats what I did.
  9. by   Lynn Casey RN
    I'm not sure if your hospital has a "float team".This is what I recommend.It's a fulltime job but each day you go some where else to get a taste of a little bit of everything.Good luck!
  10. by   Brownms46
    Originally posted by Lynn Casey RN:
    I'm not sure if your hospital has a "float team".This is what I recommend.It's a fulltime job but each day you go some where else to get a taste of a little bit of everything.Good luck!
    Are you kidding? Where would her orientation come from...how much orientation on each unit do you think she would get? I'm sorry, but I just think that is a really bad idea. Experience tells me, her orientation would probably get lost in the scramble to staff units, and she would probably find herself by herself all too quickly. Plus I know a lot of experience nurses who don't handle floating, let alone a novice. I would go with the other suggestions to try out what you liked in school.

    Brownie
  11. by   Lynn Casey RN
    Originally posted by Brownms46:
    Originally posted by Lynn Casey RN:
    I'm not sure if your hospital has a "float team".This is what I recommend.It's a fulltime job but each day you go some where else to get a taste of a little bit of everything.Good luck!
    Are you kidding? Where would her orientation come from...how much orientation on each unit do you think she would get? I'm sorry, but I just think that is a really bad idea. Experience tells me, her orientation would probably get lost in the scramble to staff units, and she would probably find herself by herself all too quickly. Plus I know a lot of experience nurses who don't handle floating, let alone a novice. I would go with the other suggestions to try out what you liked in school.

    Brownie
    Sorry,I should have clarified "float team".Our float team has an extensive orientation with a senior mentor for a month or more if needed.An orientation of a week per floor is offered as well.After 2 years of floor experience a month long critical care course is offered.With a one month senior mentor orientation again.As well our floats are able to give floor prefences.I definitely advocate picking what you liked best in nursing school first and trying it out but the poster seemed "lost".I was just offering other options.I agree that if the above mentioned orientation isn't part of the deal not to do it.A place to call "home" is very important when just starting out.Thanks for the reminder.

  12. by   hollykate
    I agree with the problems mentioned regarding new grads in the float pool. Plus, when you do float pool, you often go very frequently to the shot staffed areas- which are usually the same area again and again- and why is it short staffed? Mayeb the pt population is difficult, or the nurses are evil. In addition, I have found that when you float, they ASSUME you have done it all- and don't need help putitng in an NG tube- etc. But floating to different areas when offerred with an open mind is a great option and can help clarify things- which is what I think Lynn meant in general.
  13. by   burger914
    I just wanted to say thank you to everyone that responded. I took your advice and I just started on a Med/Surg floor as a Student Nurse. The people on this floor are so wonderful and encouraging I plan to stay after I graduate. It is a challenging floor, but supportive co-workers make all the difference!!!
  14. by   Brownms46


    Brownie[/B][/QUOTE]Sorry,I should have clarified "float team".Our float team has an extensive orientation with a senior mentor for a month or more if needed.An orientation of a week per floor is offered as well.After 2 years of floor experience a month long critical care course is offered.With a one month senior mentor orientation again.As well our floats are able to give floor prefences.I definitely advocate picking what you liked best in nursing school first and trying it out but the poster seemed "lost".I was just offering other options.I agree that if the above mentioned orientation isn't part of the deal not to do it.A place to call "home" is very important when just starting out.Thanks for the reminder.

    [/B][/QUOTE]

    Thanks for the clarification Lynn! Sorry if my response was a little sharp. The plan you described was much better than what the way I have seen it done. Sounds like a very good way to see what you like that way, and not get lost in the mix. Like another poster stated. In some hospitals it is easy for others to forget you're a newbie, and not to available to help, when things start getting hectic. I'm glad the original poster has found a good home. Best wishes to you, and remember to constantly pick the brains of those around you. Every experienced caregiver, will be able to give you something useful, no matter who they are.


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