What to Do When Your Pay Expectations Do Not Match The Specialties You Do Well In - page 4

So, I am in the process of searching for a full time nursing position so I can leave my second job. So far, there are no offers except for numerous shifts at the nursing job I currently work part... Read More

  1. by   Flatlander
    Just now, Googling "average nursing salary in Michigan" brought up the following: "Mean annual wage Michigan $65,820, Average RN $67,000." Glassdoor: $64,000. BSN, 2013: $55,000, $26.66/hr. Indeed.com, RN $30.47 average, ICU $34.72 average. "Nursing salary guide, Average US RN salary $67,930, $32.66/hr. from "national average wage figures."

    By the way, these figures appear to be based on a 40 hour work week. (Does anyone know of nurses scheduled for 40 hours a week? Most in my area are 32 to 36 hours per week for full-time.)

    So please lay off all the moralizing directed at the OP. And stop wondering where all the unrealistic expectations are coming from! Try your own cursory search in your state. If my Google results were outside the norm, let me know. (But please don't judge my motives and integrity. Thanks!)

    On a side note, what is wrong with women expecting to earn a decent living for all the hard work, both in preparing for and carrying out a career? In terms of expectations, what could be higher than the performance expectations required of nurses, when any lapse could have serious consequences? I personally would like to see us supporting, not bashing one another.
    Last edit by Flatlander on Aug 26 : Reason: added comments
  2. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Flatlander
    On a side note, what is wrong with women expecting to earn a decent living for all the hard work, both in preparing for and carrying out a career? In terms of expectations, what could be higher than the performance expectations required of nurses, when any lapse could have serious consequences? I personally would like to see us supporting, not bashing one another.
    I get what you're saying and agree with you up to a point but I think the OP would have had a more sympathetic response if she had refrained from editorializing about jobs being beneath her because she's a BSN. In essence SHE bashed a very large percentage of the nurses on this site and hasn't seen fit to come back and explain herself or edit her comments.
  3. by   chris21sn
    Honestly don't believe the nurses that say you cannot have a decent starting salary as a bsn. I received a starting of 36.50/hr as a new grad. I was also looking for per diem jobs. The first offered me 35/hr - rejected. The second 34/hr - rejected. And then the third offered me 46.50/hr - accepted.It can be done. Just don't settle. Keep looking, be willing to do interviews and spend time looking for what you want. Have clear goals in mind. I'm a new grad. With bsn. Only currently 9 months of experience.

    Good luck.
  4. by   3ringnursing
    Back in nineteen-hundred-and-ninety-oh-four (when we existed without home computers, cell phones, online social media, and video games were 16 bit ... back when gas was a dollar a gallon, MTV was king O' the airwaves, and Coke had real sugar ... basically when we all rode dinosaurs to work, and had to leave our homes to socialize) the highest new grad nursing pay in my city was: {very dramatic drum roll ...} $12.75/hr in Tucson, AZ.

    Yup, your eyes aren't deceiving you.

    That wasn't even $25,000 annually for full-time work at 36 hr's/wk. Now THAT was something to cry in your coffee about.

    They have been telling us for eons a BSN would eventually replace all ADN, and diploma nursing degrees ... we would get higher pay than our non-baccalaureate trained peers ... Blahbadee blah blah ... it wasn't factual then, and 20+ years later that is still not true.

    A BSN really only has any merit if you plan to further your nursing education, or an employer says you must have it for a specific job title ... other than that it's never got me increased dinero in my pay check as a lagniappe. Ever.

    And I've never skirted code brown duty due to my BSN degree either.

    I will be a nurse 24 years in December - I only make $32.00/hr (if you break down my salary). I'm not sure how many years you've been working as an RN, but you won't get rich doing it.

    I'm very sorry you are so disappointed right now with your current employment status, I get it. At times I've had frustration in my nursing career regarding finding a job with a better fit and higher pay, perhaps we've all been there, but patience really is a virtue and key to your predicament.

    I don't know really how long you've been searching (years?) but if it is only months perhaps you should consider my kindly, freely offered advice to garner some perseverance in your job quest before you decide to chuck your nursing degree in favor of another career.

    It may take a bit of time to find that perfect, forever job. Just walking away from nursing doesn't make sense to me considering the time, effort and money one invests into obtaining a nursing education and nursing license.

    Batten down the hatches and continue your job search - something that both appeals to you and pays a decent wage. Choose wisely and stay put if possible - every time you leap frog from one employer to the next you lose money in your retirement portfolio via the money your employer matches your contributions. You then have to wait all over again to become fully vested to earn that matching potential - this equals loss of FREE MONEY (New job = loss of potential 401k or 403b $$$). Depending on your current age, and how many years off retirement is for you, this may not seem very important now, but that is a mistake! Living well and securely then depends on decisions you make now. Be smart: no one told me these things back when it mattered and now I'm scrambling - but you my friend do: me.

    And one more tiny morsal of advice: all RN's really are equal in status. You definitely won't earn many fans by publically blathering the idiocy someone in your past sadly misinformed you of - a BSN trained nurse is not superior to alternately educated RN's. It's not your fault you were advised of this, as I recall hearing it too somewhere in my dark, murky past - however don't buy into it either, because it's a load of steaming road apples.

    Now go start your job search afresh, pull your patience around yourself - and best of luck.
  5. by   Flatlander
    Quote from purplegal
    So, I am in the process of searching for a full time nursing position so I can leave my second job. So far, there are no offers except for numerous shifts at the nursing job I currently work part time at, a skilled nursing facility. At $26.52/hr, the wage is not what you would expect a nurse with a BSN to be making, nor is this type of nursing really meant for nurses who have BSN degrees.
    I think it is making a leap to suggest that the OP considers a type of nursing "beneath her." Maybe other posters asked her for more information about what kind of nursing she felt she was being prepared for in her BSN, and what type she feels best suited for. It seems there were many more avenues of information for her to explore, maybe starting with a talk to her college about the mismatch between reality and expectations. Also the fastest routes to qualifying for "better jobs" (in terms of pay, not necessarily prestige, as posters implied.) It could also have been beneficial to recontact interviewers for feedback on her perceived lack of qualifications or "fit" for better paid jobs.

    Ironically, an ad for a BSN program on this page states "Keep Nursing. Start Leading." And in what occupations does more education not translate into better pay? Educators who get a master's generally earn more pay, and make no excuses for their reason for doing so.

    After the considerable bashing she received, I'm not surprised she did not return.
    Last edit by Flatlander on Aug 26 : Reason: typos
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Flatlander
    I think it is making a leap to suggest that the OP considers a type of nursing "beneath her." Maybe other posters asked her for more information about what kind of nursing she felt she was being prepared for in her BSN, and what type she feels best suited for. It seems there were many more avenues of information for her to explore, maybe starting with a talk to her college about the mismatch between reality and expectations. Also the fastest routes to qualifying for "better jobs" (in terms of pay, not necessarily prestige, as posters implied.) It could also have been beneficial to recontact interviewers for feedback on her perceived lack of qualifications or "fit" for better paid jobs.

    Ironically, an ad for a BSN program on this page states "Keep Nursing. Start Leading." And in what occupations does more education not translate into better pay? Educators who get a master's generally earn more pay, and make no excuses for their reason for doing so.

    After the considerable bashing she received, I'm not surprised she did not return.
    Check out some of the OP's other threads. No one is jumping to conclusions by assuming that the OP considers some nursing jobs to be lame.
  7. by   brandy1017
    Quote from Flatlander
    Just now, Googling "average nursing salary in Michigan" brought up the following: "Mean annual wage Michigan $65,820, Average RN $67,000." Glassdoor: $64,000. BSN, 2013: $55,000, $26.66/hr. Indeed.com, RN $30.47 average, ICU $34.72 average. "Nursing salary guide, Average US RN salary $67,930, $32.66/hr. from "national average wage figures."

    By the way, these figures appear to be based on a 40 hour work week. (Does anyone know of nurses scheduled for 40 hours a week? Most in my area are 32 to 36 hours per week for full-time.)

    So please lay off all the moralizing directed at the OP. And stop wondering where all the unrealistic expectations are coming from! Try your own cursory search in your state. If my Google results were outside the norm, let me know. (But please don't judge my motives and integrity. Thanks!)

    On a side note, what is wrong with women expecting to earn a decent living for all the hard work, both in preparing for and carrying out a career? In terms of expectations, what could be higher than the performance expectations required of nurses, when any lapse could have serious consequences? I personally would like to see us supporting, not bashing one another.
    Average nurse salary is not new grad salary. I would think it implies experienced nurses. $26 is starting pay for new grads where I work, although I hear other hospital systems pay $1-2 more an hour. Have heard of an RT who became a RN offered base new grad pay, would have been a significant pay cut so obviously did not take the job! I wouldn't either. Sad to say hospitals are run like corporations now and pay as little as possible and with the glut of new grads from all the nursing schools I guess they can get away with it. All you can do is vote with your feet and keep looking for a job that pays better!
  8. by   Flatlander
    Quote from brandy1017
    Average nurse salary is not new grad salary. I would think it implies experienced nurses. $26 is starting pay for new grads where I work, although I hear other hospital systems pay $1-2 more an hour. Have heard of an RT who became a RN offered base new grad pay, would have been a significant pay cut so obviously did not take the job! I wouldn't either. Sad to say hospitals are run like corporations now and pay as little as possible and with the glut of new grads from all the nursing schools I guess they can get away with it. All you can do is vote with your feet and keep looking for a job that pays better!
    I do agree with your point that there is a range of salaries to be expected, and we need to look at the whole picture -- something that is not automatically provided when we sign up for the degree programs. The nation as a whole is struggling with graduates' low pay and high student debt loads. This in a time when the top 1-2% of household incomes are skyrocketing, and healthcare becomes more and more a profit-making enterprise. (Unconscionable a generation ago!)

    My point was, and is, more support for each other to overcome, not to just leave (i.e. vote with our feet), suck up our disappointment, and knuckle under (i.e., try harder.) The personal is political inevitably. Sad to say.
  9. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from Wuzzie
    I get what you're saying and agree with you up to a point but I think the OP would have had a more sympathetic response if she had refrained from editorializing about jobs being beneath her because she's a BSN. In essence SHE bashed a very large percentage of the nurses on this site and hasn't seen fit to come back and explain herself or edit her comments.
    After she started a thread about how lame LTC nursing is.

    There's a definite history here with this poster that is prompting many of the responses.
  10. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Flatlander
    I think it is making a leap to suggest that the OP considers a type of nursing "beneath her." Maybe other posters asked her for more information about what kind of nursing she felt she was being prepared for in her BSN, and what type she feels best suited for. It seems there were many more avenues of information for her to explore, maybe starting with a talk to her college about the mismatch between reality and expectations. Also the fastest routes to qualifying for "better jobs" (in terms of pay, not necessarily prestige, as posters implied.) It could also have been beneficial to recontact interviewers for feedback on her perceived lack of qualifications or "fit" for better paid jobs.

    Ironically, an ad for a BSN program on this page states "Keep Nursing. Start Leading." And in what occupations does more education not translate into better pay? Educators who get a master's generally earn more pay, and make no excuses for their reason for doing so.

    After the considerable bashing she received, I'm not surprised she did not return.
    Look at what you quoted. She flat out said the skilled nursing position she does have is not meant for BSN trained nurses. There's no leaping here. And as far as contacting recruiters. She has applied to the same facility 31 times!!! 31!!!! I don't think the recruiters are interested in talking to her. And to be fair. I warned her at the very beginning before anybody started "bashing" her that she had stepped in it. Clearly she didn't care. You really should read her other posts to get a better idea of her MO. I'm kind of thinking it's a symptom of a bigger problem which may be impacting her ability to get a job more to her liking.
  11. by   Flatlander
    Quote from Wuzzie
    Look at what you quoted. She flat out said the skilled nursing position she does have is not meant for BSN trained nurses. There's no leaping here. And as far as contacting recruiters. She has applied to the same facility 31 times!!! 31!!!! I don't think the recruiters are interested in talking to her. And to be fair. I warned her at the very beginning before anybody started "bashing" her that she had stepped in it. Clearly she didn't care. You really should read her other posts to get a better idea of her MO. I'm kind of thinking it's a symptom of a bigger problem which may be impacting her ability to get a job more to her liking.
    Thank you Wuzzie for the explanation. Seems like she should be looking for feedback from supervisors and interviewers to guide future career progress. There's often "more to the story," as you suggest. I still prefer a gentle reply, rather than the sharp rhetoric. You catch more flies with honey, than vinegar as the old saying goes...and still is true.
  12. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Flatlander
    Thank you Wuzzie for the explanation. Seems like she should be looking for feedback from supervisors and interviewers to guide future career progress. There's often "more to the story," as you suggest. I still prefer a gentle reply, rather than the sharp rhetoric. You catch more flies with honey, than vinegar as the old saying goes...and still is true.
    I agree with you about the tone of replies which is why I warned her early on to give her a chance to edit her post to avoid the inevitable which she chose not to do. This is not the first time the OP has been warned and she just. doesn't. listen. I think many of us have lost patience with her. Honestly, she seems to be her own worst enemy and I don't much enjoy watching someone self-destruct.
  13. by   CrunchRN
    I am just devastated that a BSN is being treated so harshly lol.

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