What to Do When Your Pay Expectations Do Not Match The Specialties You Do Well In - page 3

So, I am in the process of searching for a full time nursing position so I can leave my second job. So far, there are no offers except for numerous shifts at the nursing job I currently work part... Read More

  1. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Here.I.Stand
    Thought #1... what the what??? Did you just say that??

    Thought #2... uff da, yeah you really did. (Thought #2a) I typically don't say "uff da" unless I'm especially flabbergasted.)

    Thought #3...Actually, I had an amazing geriatric nursing class in my BSN program. Far and away, it was the class where I learned the most. Also, since geriatrics is a specialty practiced by GNPs, why the heck would geriatrics NOT be "meant for nurses with BSN degrees?" A BSN RN is hardly overqualified for geriatrics...... in fact one can be underqualified for it.

    Thought #4... This site has nearly a million members. I wonder if there are any nurse managers who find your resume awfully familiar?
    She went there. She went there before when she said "Long Term Care Nursing is Lame". Perhaps the issue isn't so much the jobs that are available, the pay or the profession, but the attitude.
  2. by   Glycerine82
    the wage is not what you would expect a nurse with a BSN to be making, nor is this type of nursing really meant for nurses who have BSN degrees
    What kind of nurses should work in a SNF? SNF nurses don't have to have a BSN, no, but having one doesn't automatically equate to being over qualified. It also doesn't mean that working in a SNF is beneath you or that you wouldn't use your skills.

    I expect nurses to make whatever the local rate is for the type of nursing they are doing.


    If you want more money for your BSN you'll have to do a job that an associate prepared RN can't do, it's that simple.

    If you would look for a job outside of nursing after all the work that likely went into getting your degree and licence, I really don't know what to tell you.
  3. by   hppygr8ful
    It is a spiritual axiom that the higher you expectations are the less likely you are to be happy. You either have to adjust your expectations or stretch your wings and try working outside your comfort zone. If you are always comfortable you are not growing.

    Hppy
  4. by   phiir
    Quote from Glycerine82
    What kind of nurses should work in a SNF? SNF nurses don't have to have a BSN, no, but having one doesn't automatically equate to being over qualified. It also doesn't mean that working in a SNF is beneath you or that you wouldn't use your skills.
    As far as I know around this part of Texas, most of the SNF's require at least one RN to be in the facility at all times so they have the DON during the day and then hire one supervisor RN for the hours the DON is not there. The rest of the staff is comprised of LVN's and Med Aides. They hire as few RN's as possible because they have to pay them more.
  5. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from phiir
    As far as I know around this part of Texas, most of the SNF's require at least one RN to be in the facility at all times so they have the DON during the day and then hire one supervisor RN for the hours the DON is not there. The rest of the staff is comprised of LVN's and Med Aides. They hire as few RN's as possible because they have to pay them more.
    The question was rhetorical. The OP managed to insult a large percentage of the members here. Please re-read the original post.
  6. by   LibraSunCNM
    Honestly I think this poster is just a craftier-than-normal troll.
  7. by   chacha82
    I had a tasty bagel this morning so I'm taking the bait.



    "At $26.52/hr, the wage is not what you would expect a nurse with a BSN to be making, nor is this type of nursing really meant for nurses who have BSN degrees."

    All types of bedside nursing/clinic nursing/outpatient/school nursing are appropriate for the registered nurse, whether they are RN or BSN. I made $22 as a new grad in a hospital two years ago, so I would have been very happy with $26/hr. Many employers pay for experience, not the BSN.

    You say $23/hr is not acceptable, but what will it cost you to leave the profession altogether? Additional education and the salary you forfeit while in school will surely cost more than the $26/hr you already earn. (Unless you are independently wealthy). Higher-paying jobs do NOT go to people with less experience.

    I'm not saying stay at this position if you don't like it, by all means, find something better. But not all facilities pay more for the BSN, and $26/hr is very comparable to other salaries nurses earn where I live. In fact, it's at the high end. Where I went to school, new grads were started at $19-$21/hr. If it's about the money, don't leave your position. If it's about the type of work, be prepared to move or take a potential pay cut.
  8. by   ~♪♫ in my ♥~
    Quote from Zyprexa
    Here we go again!

    I've got popcorn if anyone wants some
    Popcorn, no... Zydis, yeah.

    Quote from elkpark
    Maybe what one needs to do is reevaluate one's "pay expectations." Or learn to "do well in" a specialty that meets those expectations.
    I was going to write this but I figured that somebody already had.

    It does seem to be the logical answer, no?
  9. by   BedsideNurse
    @Castiela Hello. I agree that even with all the perils in ICU (and it's getting worse), it's light years better than working on the floor. I've never worked anywhere that paid more for a BSN or gave any extra money to any particular unit. As other people have said, a lot of hospitals are pushing staff to go back to school these days, and I have seen a lot of job ads that say BSN preferred. I don't think it has anything to do with practice; they just feel it looks better on paper. But anyway, I was just wondering what a critical care advanced diploma is and where such things are offered?
    Last edit by BedsideNurse on Aug 26 : Reason: meant to respond to Castiela, but just added to general comments. :(
  10. by   kbrn2002
    Not knowing the job market where you are or the comparison of wage to relative cost of living it's impossible to say if you are truly undercompensated in your current position. If you are underpaid, keep looking for that higher paying job and eventually you will land one. On the other hand, if your wage is within the normal range for similar jobs in your area all the complaining in the world won't change that. You can keep looking for a higher paying job outside of your area of experience which might take a long time to find, so patience young grasshopper! Your other option is moving to where your specialty actually does pay more, but if the cost of living is also more you're no better off than where you are now. Worst case scenario option is bailing from nursing altogether, so if you do decide you can't take it anymore what's your backup career plan that will magically land you the wage you are looking for?
  11. by   Castiela
    Quote from BedsideNurse
    @Castiela Hello. I agree that even with all the perils in ICU (and it's getting worse), it's light years better than working on the floor. I've never worked anywhere that paid more for a BSN or gave any extra money to any particular unit. As other people have said, a lot of hospitals are pushing staff to go back to school these days, and I have seen a lot of job ads that say BSN preferred. I don't think it has anything to do with practice; they just feel it looks better on paper. But anyway, I was just wondering what a critical care advanced diploma is and where such things are offered?
    I'm Canadian, so in my province, you generally aren't considered for critical care jobs without advanced schooling. Also, BSN is considered the minimum to practice as an RN if you are a new nurse in the past 10 years or so. For me, my employer paid for 4.5 months full time class work and clinical placements with a focus on ecg interpretation, vents and full day/s lectures about the body systems and common icu problems, how to treat and icu pharmacology. The clinical placement equal two months of supervised partial caring of icu patients (you have an instructor and an Rn from the site caring for the patient; you make mind maps and care plans and discuss how the patient condition relates to the oxygen supply and demand framework etc) You can do it independently through specific schools (ie BCIT in British Columbia) over the course of 2 years part time. The program I went through was well put together and helped me feel confident to start icu. Of course caring for patients on my own easy whole new learning curve, but I felt I had a strong background.
  12. by   Medic/Nurse
    Here's a simple fact.

    You control your fate. No. It's a complete sentence.

    Interview. Work where you can/want. You have choices. I don't see a problem.

    Not getting what you think you are "worth"?? Move on. Bb-bye.

    TRUE STORY

    I interviewed at a hospital closest to where my hubby lived in 2007 (now, yep I know that was a decade ago) and was offered sub $15 an hour. Way, way less than half of what I was making. And almost 35% of what I started at. Yikes. WTH.

    For a CRITICAL CARE RESPONSE spot. Meaning ER, ICU & House mouse.

    SUB $15 an hour. FIFTEEN DOLLARS. One Five.

    I thought I was going to laugh out loud right there, I didn't tho. Good thing I had plenty of pageant experience (it DID come in handy mom!) so I could stand there smiling, instead of standing there with my mouth gaping open in horror.

    I had an ADN, BBA (Marketing), CEN, CCRN, CFRN, 5 years strong experience including clinical instruction.

    Offered the job on the spot. I mean they had my resume/app for a week and I'm sure they vetted & recon'ed me. As flattered as I was after going on the "meet and greet tour", I turned it down on the spot.

    When I inquired about the salary, I was unequivocally informed that they were able to recruit from 3 schools of nursing and never had a shortage of nurses willing to work. I wished them good luck with that.

    You see $15 included night/weekend diffs -- I will not work as a nurse for sub $30k a year. The liability alone is NOT worth it.

    I went home and my husband met me at the door. "The lady from the hospital has called twice and insists that you call her". I made sure I hadn't forgot my purse or something. Nah, I've got my things, what could she want?

    I called her and she informed me that they were willing to offer me an addition $0.75 an hour because I was "so qualified". She sounded so hopeful. I knew I still wasn't going to accept, but told her I'd discuss with my husband and call her back. I declined it too. Just no.

    No, nope. I cannot & will NOT work for 30,000 dollars a year doing difficult (at times) or risky (at times) work, UNLESS my family got into a situation where NEED became the overwhelming issue. The liability and risk issues are too great at some rates of pay.

    YMMV.

  13. by   Bob Loblaw
    Every RN I know who is concerned about pay is in online 18 month NP schools- join the crowd and make the moola. I'm old and worn out, lost interest andcounting the days.

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