What States Pay the Highest and Lowest Nursing Salaries - page 3

As with any job, salaries for nurses vary greatly from state to state and even city to city within the same state. Below are listed average high and low state salaries by degree based on the results... Read More

  1. by   Orphan RN
    Quote from Lavernh
    I have a very serious question and I would appreciate input from you guys. I am 42 years old an I just started school at my local college ( Broward College) but I as wondering if I have waited too long. I worked for a hospital for over 4 years and I got such a thrill watching the nurses do something that I've always wanted to do. Do any of you think that it is too late or do you know of someone that have gone back to school at this point in their life to become an RN ( hopefully a NP someday)? Btw, I am doing my prereqs' because a school that I attended before was shutown due to not being accredited and fraud.

    Never for too late - until you are dead.

    My husband left real estate appraising after more than 20 years to get an OTAC associates degree. He graduates in less than 2 weeks - and he just turned 51. It's not nursing, but it's medical … and you get the idea …

    I say go for it. We always need more nurses! Good luck!
    Last edit by Orphan RN on Jun 15, '16
  2. by   lifelearningrn
    In my area, ADNs and BSNs are paid the same hourly. The only advantage a BSN is here is some jobs require it..but hospitals that hire both, pay them equally.

    I had no idea diploma nurses were paid so much less than ADNs and BSNs. In fact, I didn't realize there was such a difference in some states between all three.

    Texas pay for bedside nurses is pretty good. We don't make much as school nurses, but the trade off for all the time off is worth it, if you can afford to swing it.
  3. by   That Guy
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Woohoo, Kansas representin' our crappie salaries.
    NO kidding. I got the biggest pay increase just from moving out of that hell hole state
  4. by   KatelynRodriguez
    It's definitely not too late. Just be prepared for nursing school. I just started the broward college nursing program and it is super intense. Before you even apply I would get all your ceu's done (it's listed online and they are good for two years. Go on ceufast.com) also one thing that was extremely taxing on our time for the first two weeks is that we had to do our hospital orientations online and they took forever. So I would try to do those ahead. Also a tip for studying, don't try to read everything. Follow the modules they give you and read along with the book. Also for math i bought the kaplan math review for nurses and it helped me so much.You just have to have faith in yourself. You can do it.
  5. by   Kssrn404
    You are NOT TOO old!!! I say go for it!!! I'm 52 and just starting back to work in cardiac critical care after being off for 14 years to raise my three kids. I had to go back to school for a while but it was a blast! I couldn't learn fast enough. I love it!! You will do great!
  6. by   kbrn2002
    No doubt that cost of living, particularly housing and utilities can vary wildly even within a state. I'm in WI and COL is much higher in Madison or Milwaukee than it is where I live. But wages are also much higher in the big metropolitans than where I am.

    I looked into moving to Washington a few years back and decided against it as the housing was so sky high in any place west of the Cascades that there was pretty much no way I could see affording to live there. I still have relatives in the Seattle/Olympia area and it is beautiful on that side of the mountains but the pay wasn't high enough to justify the massive increase in housing costs I would have faced by moving.
  7. by   gizmopacurn
    Glad to see Oregon on the top. I love living and working in Oregon and northwest in general but want to travel in a few years after I finish my BSN. Oregon does have a high cost of living though and rent and mortgage's here is increasing rapidly.
  8. by   gizmopacurn
    Quote from Lavernh
    I have a very serious question and I would appreciate input from you guys. I am 42 years old and I just started school at my local college ( Broward College) but I as wondering if I have waited too long. I worked for a hospital for over 4 years and I got such a thrill watching the nurses do something that I've always wanted to do. Do any of you think that it is too late or do you know of someone that have gone back to school at this point in their life to become an RN ( hopefully an NP someday)? Btw, I am doing my prereqs' because a school that I attended before was shut down due to not being accredited and fraud.
    Hi Lavernh, I was 41 when I graduated and received my RN-ADN degree. I went from being a lab tech to an MA, to a pharmacy technician to nursing. I love being an RN now and I am currently working on my BSN and I am 50. I found that being an older nursing student I had more knowledge and life experience from being in the medical field than the new young students with no life experience yet. I think you will do great and not regret at all doing it. Good luck future RN!!
  9. by   estellebb
    Maybe California is an option after all.... So, the extras - like holiday pay - is in addition to your 130K? What is the going rate for BSN then??

    ''
  10. by   sourapril
    Does the average salary look low to you guys? I remembered reading or asking folks here in other posts and the hourly rates seemed higher.
  11. by   Dogen
    Quote from Orphan RN
    I just don't understand cost of living disclaimers - it pretty much cost the same in every state to fly some where, buy certain items, and pay to live. We are under paid ladies and gentlemen, no two ways about it.
    A lot of things differ in price from state to state, even city to city. Gas and housing vary wildly. You can find 450sqft studio apartments in Portland that rent for $1700/month, which is a house payment (or two) in most places. You can also compare average price of the consumer index to what you pay to see if you pay more or less than the average price of goods. in my case, I pay more than the average for virtually everything except apples. If you multiply the10-20% more I pay across 10-30 items, every week for a year, it's several thousand dollars. Plus the high cost of housing, where I pay as much to rent a 2-bedroom apartment as I paid for a whole house in Washington.

    Alternately, if I move across the river to Vancouver (which a lot of people who work in Portland do) my effective salary increases about 10-15% based entirely on differences in cost of living.
  12. by   Double Dunker
    I'm sorry, but this info is completely unhelpful. I live in Indiana and I just got a $2.50/hr raise for a market adjustment. My base yearly salary still puts me in the bottom 6 states for BSN salaries, but Indiana isn't listed there. Without info about how much OT people work and how much shift diff is, this info is worthless. I'd like to know the average salary in Indiana. Rumor has it my hospital is at the bottom of the payscale in my area, but I have no way to verify that info.
  13. by   Tjhughes7
    Florida has one of lowest pay scales. After 35+ years of nursing starting pay less than 30$/hr. Was making ~ 35$/hr in Kansas and it was ranked #5

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