What should I ask the Board of Nursing? - page 2

by PrisonrNurs 2,140 Views | 18 Comments

Hello everyone, It's been a while since I posted a thread on here, but I have an interesting situation. The Board of Nursing is coming to our class to discuss violations of the Nurse Practice Act. This is probably consistent... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I guess I just don't see the reason to confront the BON. If it doesn't involve YOU, the less you have to do with the BON, the better.

    And...as a student, I sure as heck wouldn't put my name in their memory.
    I totally agree. What reason do you really have to put them on the spot? For them to write down your name and wait for you to earn your license and throw darts at you? If I were in your shoes, I would hear what they have to say, address only what they ask in short answers and stay out of their way. Believe me, if they are already rude, they have answers that justify whatever their actions are and are ready for the attack. Don't let it be you before you have a chance.
    Vito Andolini likes this.
  2. 1
    Quote from PrisonrNurs
    Well I am a student, returning to school after some time in the workforce. Let me clarify. Not all my information is second-hand. The BoN was in our facility to do an audit and were so incredibly rude, our director filed a formal complaint and the warden almost had them escorted off of property. I say "bias" based on the incident involving a male and female nurse who were guilty of smuggling in contraband, and both were fired because of it. In addition, the female nurse was also guilty of sexual contact while in the performance of her duties. The male nurse was fined $2,400 dollars and had his license suspended for two years. The female nurse got off with a $500 fine and a reprimand. Aside from the sexual contact, both incidents were the same, based on the case files we read. Our facility physician said he worked with a NP who was reported to the BoN by an inmate. She was terrorized for months by the BoN and eventually left the state because of what they did to her. The BoN believed she was guilty of sexual contact based not on any factual evidence, or even allegations but on the inmates claims that the NP was smuggling explosives into the prison...in her vagina. Again the case files were read in this case.

    Debating the BoN would be foolish, but really? Are such actions prudent for "respected" members of the community?
    Keep a low profile and don't make waves. Silence is golden. You do not know the entire story, I'd wager. You only know what other people have said. What would be achieved by being a firebrand at this point?

    How did you get the case files????
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
  3. 1
    The Board of Nurse is in place to protect the public and to assure, to the best of their ability that nursing is practiced in a safe manner. They are not there generally to assist the nurse, although my dealings with them in the past when I was a director of nursing (in Texas) were fair and impartial. I suggest that your questions be profession and that you do not become antagonistic toward them. You might ask "what services are offered by the board to the nurse who commits an infraction to help them?'. "Does the board ever report incidents that occur to law enforcement?". Give us a follow up after the meeting. I would be interested to know the outcome.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
  4. 0
    Quote from diane227
    The Board of Nurse is in place to protect the public and to assure, to the best of their ability that nursing is practiced in a safe manner. They are not there generally to assist the nurse, although my dealings with them in the past when I was a director of nursing (in Texas) were fair and impartial. I suggest that your questions be profession and that you do not become antagonistic toward them. You might ask "what services are offered by the board to the nurse who commits an infraction to help them?'. "Does the board ever report incidents that occur to law enforcement?". Give us a follow up after the meeting. I would be interested to know the outcome.
    I can say that the BON has been very informative and quick to respond in my experience with them. I have no problems emailing them to ask questions and they have sent me copies of policies to back up what they advise. I know they are really to protect the public moreso than the nurse, so, I try and be very precise with my questions as well as civil in my interactions with them.
  5. 1
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I can say that the BON has been very informative and quick to respond in my experience with them. I have no problems emailing them to ask questions and they have sent me copies of policies to back up what they advise. I know they are really to protect the public moreso than the nurse, so, I try and be very precise with my questions as well as civil in my interactions with them.
    I have always had v. positive, pleasant experiences with the BONs in the states in which I've practiced, too. It's important, though, for nurses (esp. students and new grads, who are the ones most often unclear) to understand clearly that the BON is a regulatory board, not a nursing advocacy organization.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from elkpark
    I have always had v. positive, pleasant experiences with the BONs in the states in which I've practiced, too. It's important, though, for nurses (esp. students and new grads, who are the ones most often unclear) to understand clearly that the BON is a regulatory board, not a nursing advocacy organization.
    Agreed...I would NEVER confide in areas that I could have goofed in...
  7. 1
    Quote from diane227
    Give us a follow up after the meeting. I would be interested to know the outcome.
    Our class met with the board today. It was interesting and honestly, I wish it could have been longer than an hour.

    Anyway, the meeting did go well. I imagine some of you were expecting me to make an ass of myself and try to debate the BoN on some issue. Well, needless to say, I was civil, but I did ask a few "thought provoking" questions. Many of the other students asked scenario questions so I thought I'd throw one at her, which is based on a real incident that happened.

    We help manage young offenders who by definition are wards of the state. In one of the cases, the nurse was ordered by the physician to administer a Gardasil vaccine. The parents of the youth absolutely forbade it. The nurse, also the supervisor of the facility, was torn between the wishes of the parents and her duties as a nurse to follow the doctor's orders. She consulted the attorney general, who advised she follow the wishes of the parents. She did, and the nurse was accused of insubordination by the physician and subsequently disciplined.

    I saw this as an ethical dilemma and asked the Board what the prudent course of action would have been in this case. All the Board could offer was some terse laughter as well as a deer-in-the-headlights look. After a few seconds the Board representative did state that she would need more information before she could comment. I just dropped the issue after that.

    It was very interesting and as part of our clinical assignments, we will be shadowing the board during one of their sessions later in the year. That will be exciting to say the least.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.
  8. 0
    Quote from PrisonrNurs
    Our class met with the board today. It was interesting and honestly, I wish it could have been longer than an hour.

    Anyway, the meeting did go well. I imagine some of you were expecting me to make an ass of myself and try to debate the BoN on some issue. Well, needless to say, I was civil, but I did ask a few "thought provoking" questions. Many of the other students asked scenario questions so I thought I'd throw one at her, which is based on a real incident that happened.

    We help manage young offenders who by definition are wards of the state. In one of the cases, the nurse was ordered by the physician to administer a Gardasil vaccine. The parents of the youth absolutely forbade it. The nurse, also the supervisor of the facility, was torn between the wishes of the parents and her duties as a nurse to follow the doctor's orders. She consulted the attorney general, who advised she follow the wishes of the parents. She did, and the nurse was accused of insubordination by the physician and subsequently disciplined.

    I saw this as an ethical dilemma and asked the Board what the prudent course of action would have been in this case. All the Board could offer was some terse laughter as well as a deer-in-the-headlights look. After a few seconds the Board representative did state that she would need more information before she could comment. I just dropped the issue after that.

    It was very interesting and as part of our clinical assignments, we will be shadowing the board during one of their sessions later in the year. That will be exciting to say the least.
    I think that you brought up a very good scenerio...I mean, the parents said no... Did she document that the parents refused the vaccine? I can't see how she was disciplined. Many times, patients I work with in GYN refuse things that the doctor ordered. I document the refusal in the chart, get the patient to sign the refusal form, inform my charge nurse and physician...nothing happened to me. Unbelievable! Thanks for sharing!
  9. 1
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    I think that you brought up a very good scenerio...I mean, the parents said no... Did she document that the parents refused the vaccine? I can't see how she was disciplined. Many times, patients I work with in GYN refuse things that the doctor ordered. I document the refusal in the chart, get the patient to sign the refusal form, inform my charge nurse and physician...nothing happened to me. Unbelievable! Thanks for sharing!
    I believe the issue in the scenario is whether the parents have the legal right/authority to give or withhold consent if a child is a "ward of the state," or does the DSS or DJJ staff member responsible for the minor give/withhold consent. That's a sticky, very specific question which would depend on state law, and I certainly don't criticize or question the BON member for not having a response to that question on the tip of her tongue -- she was savvy enough to realize that, since she doesn't deal with that sort of issue on a regular basis, she would be ill-advised to just announce to a group of students whatever initial thought popped into her head. The smartest response she could give was just what she said, that she would need more information.

    I do deal with this sort of question all the time, working in child psych with lots of kids who have been taken away from their parents and are in DSS custody. In our situation, it is DSS who legally gives us consent for any medications or treatments, not the kids' parents, even if the parents are still involved and the kids will eventually be returned to them. I'm not sure, though, what the specific legal status is of kids in state custody because they're in DJJ custody.
    pagandeva2000 likes this.


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