what school? (Nursing...)

  1. Good day! Im searching the web and found this forum.. thank God.
    Guys...i wanna ask if what school offers nursing program for 2nd courser? i mean if im working mondays to fridays, is there a school offers sat & sun classes for a case like this?

    thanks in advance
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   matt59
    I would think not. It is pretty much an all consuming full time thing.
    matt
  4. by   exoskeleton
    Quote from matt59
    I would think not. It is pretty much an all consuming full time thing.
    matt
    thank you matt...i guess i have to resign!
  5. by   imenid37
    There are some weekend evening programs. I think if you could work part-time and have one-two study days during the week and you were highly motivated you could do it. Who knows, you could work ft and go to school too if you really did almost nothing else. My daughter goes to school w/ some folks who work 4 days a week. They do almost nothing else but work and school. I don't know how they do it, but they do. Hers is a traditional program, these students are working evenings and weekends. I met a woman a few years back who worked all night and was doing clinicals all the next day. Not me. I need too much sleep to livel ike that. She told me she had previously been in thenavy and had had to stay up long stretchs like that before. good luck!
  6. by   exoskeleton
    Quote from imenid37
    There are some weekend evening programs. I think if you could work part-time and have one-two study days during the week and you were highly motivated you could do it. Who knows, you could work ft and go to school too if you really did almost nothing else. My daughter goes to school w/ some folks who work 4 days a week. They do almost nothing else but work and school. I don't know how they do it, but they do. Hers is a traditional program, these students are working evenings and weekends. I met a woman a few years back who worked all night and was doing clinicals all the next day. Not me. I need too much sleep to livel ike that. She told me she had previously been in thenavy and had had to stay up long stretchs like that before. good luck!
    i thank you imenid37 sir/madam...your short story motivates me! :spin: maybe i should try working while studying and if i cant make it then...its the time to decide!...more power sir/madam
  7. by   JoJo_Ga_Girl
    There is a college in Georgia, Brenau University, that offers a night and weekend college for BSN. It takes a year longer than the traditional route but people who work love it and seem to do well.
  8. by   exoskeleton
    Quote from JoJo_Ga_Girl
    There is a college in Georgia, Brenau University, that offers a night and weekend college for BSN. It takes a year longer than the traditional route but people who work love it and seem to do well.
    thank you for your comment ma'am... i really appreciate it.
  9. by   RNfromMN
    My school tried offering a part-time program & I think I speak for all the "part-timers" when I say that it was a joke. In fact, the school has discontinued the part-time section completely.

    I don't know exactly what went wrong, but these part-timers started school the same day I did & will be graduating the same day I will in May. That sounds goofy...let me try & explain it so it makes a little more sense. The school told these students they would be part-time, so these students, (understandably) kept their full-time jobs, thinking their coursework would be a little slower paced & ended up having no breaks whatsoever between semesters. No Christmas break, Spring break, nothing. To an outsider, that might not sound so bad, but believe me, once you get into the nursing program, you'll find those breaks are essential. I don't know how they did it...by the end of last semester, I was ready to keel over from exhaustion & needed that summer break more than anything...these "part-timers" didn't even get a week off before they had to spend their whole summer back in clinical.

    And the thing is, I don't even know what made these students "part-time." For the most part, they were with me in every class I took, every clinical. Once in awhile, it would occur to me, "Hey, where's Amy? Oh, that's right - she's part-time."

    Personally, I'm a full-time student in the evening program my school offers. And this is what "evening" means to my school: I've never had a class start earlier than 1:00 p.m. Doesn't really sound like "evening" does it?

    Not complaining at all - I guess I'm just trying to point out that even with words like "part-time" & "evening," as an earlier poster pointed out, it's pretty much an all-consuming deal.
  10. by   exoskeleton
    Quote from Jessica 392
    My school tried offering a part-time program & I think I speak for all the "part-timers" when I say that it was a joke. In fact, the school has discontinued the part-time section completely.

    I don't know exactly what went wrong, but these part-timers started school the same day I did & will be graduating the same day I will in May. That sounds goofy...let me try & explain it so it makes a little more sense. The school told these students they would be part-time, so these students, (understandably) kept their full-time jobs, thinking their coursework would be a little slower paced & ended up having no breaks whatsoever between semesters. No Christmas break, Spring break, nothing. To an outsider, that might not sound so bad, but believe me, once you get into the nursing program, you'll find those breaks are essential. I don't know how they did it...by the end of last semester, I was ready to keel over from exhaustion & needed that summer break more than anything...these "part-timers" didn't even get a week off before they had to spend their whole summer back in clinical.

    And the thing is, I don't even know what made these students "part-time." For the most part, they were with me in every class I took, every clinical. Once in awhile, it would occur to me, "Hey, where's Amy? Oh, that's right - she's part-time."

    Personally, I'm a full-time student in the evening program my school offers. And this is what "evening" means to my school: I've never had a class start earlier than 1:00 p.m. Doesn't really sound like "evening" does it?

    Not complaining at all - I guess I'm just trying to point out that even with words like "part-time" & "evening," as an earlier poster pointed out, it's pretty much an all-consuming deal.
    i think you're absolutely right...i think i have to give up my work just to pursue nursing...and i think that's the best way. :spin: thank you very much
  11. by   Gromit
    Exoskeleton (I rather like the monicker) there ARE programs designed for the working stiff. I carried a full-time job while taking my classes and doing clinicals -its tough as balls to do it that way, but it IS doable. When I started the RN program, I was a fuel-truck driver (tractor/trailer tanker driver -I ran bulk fuel to fuel kilns at phosphate plants etc) -my job allowed me to get an early start so I was off by 4pm, and a quick SSS (s... shower and shave) and in class by 5p. Our clinicals were given on weekends -they were long clinicals (10-12 hrs usually, though sometimes shorter). As you could imagine, you get worn out pretty badly by the time the first semester is over, and you have a long way to go yet. I lost my driving job (though not because I couldn't do the work. I had a boss that seems to have been a bit jealous that he never went to college -he let me go (refused to say 'fired' -he called it "laid off without option to rehire" (figure that one out -but it did include a severance pay of two weeks) he told me "we don't need no college boys". I think the quote says it all (don't you? )
    Anyway, fortunately, by that point I had progressed enough (we were in "GI" by then) to get the hospitals interested, and I worked as a tech for the remaining year and a half to get my ADN (at times, I held my full-time tech job, as well as a part-time one at another facility, while going to school). Its a hell of a way to go back (even one of my instructors told us (the class) that it was unrealistic for us to expect to work full time and go to class full time -I grunted and asked her if it were unrealistic for her to expect to get paid -as our class was primarily composed of folks who were too old to go back to 'mommy and daddy's house, and we still had bills to pay of our own.
    I never did get an answer.
    In any case, can you do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No, only as a last resort. If you can float a big enough loan, work part-time instead of full. By the time it was all over with, I was totally burned to a cinder, but proud as punch at my accomplishment -I went back to school (pre-reqs) in my 30s, finished up in my late 30s. No rose-colored glasses here. I knew full-well what I was getting myself into
  12. by   exoskeleton
    Quote from Gromit
    Exoskeleton (I rather like the monicker) there ARE programs designed for the working stiff. I carried a full-time job while taking my classes and doing clinicals -its tough as balls to do it that way, but it IS doable. When I started the RN program, I was a fuel-truck driver (tractor/trailer tanker driver -I ran bulk fuel to fuel kilns at phosphate plants etc) -my job allowed me to get an early start so I was off by 4pm, and a quick SSS (s... shower and shave) and in class by 5p. Our clinicals were given on weekends -they were long clinicals (10-12 hrs usually, though sometimes shorter). As you could imagine, you get worn out pretty badly by the time the first semester is over, and you have a long way to go yet. I lost my driving job (though not because I couldn't do the work. I had a boss that seems to have been a bit jealous that he never went to college -he let me go (refused to say 'fired' -he called it "laid off without option to rehire" (figure that one out -but it did include a severance pay of two weeks) he told me "we don't need no college boys". I think the quote says it all (don't you? )
    Anyway, fortunately, by that point I had progressed enough (we were in "GI" by then) to get the hospitals interested, and I worked as a tech for the remaining year and a half to get my ADN (at times, I held my full-time tech job, as well as a part-time one at another facility, while going to school). Its a hell of a way to go back (even one of my instructors told us (the class) that it was unrealistic for us to expect to work full time and go to class full time -I grunted and asked her if it were unrealistic for her to expect to get paid -as our class was primarily composed of folks who were too old to go back to 'mommy and daddy's house, and we still had bills to pay of our own.
    I never did get an answer.
    In any case, can you do it? Yes. Would I recommend it? No, only as a last resort. If you can float a big enough loan, work part-time instead of full. By the time it was all over with, I was totally burned to a cinder, but proud as punch at my accomplishment -I went back to school (pre-reqs) in my 30s, finished up in my late 30s. No rose-colored glasses here. I knew full-well what I was getting myself into
    wow sir that's amazing...how could you do that? well...by the facts i've gathered...i salute you sir...maybe i can like you do...you'll be my inspiration...thank you :spin:
  13. by   Cattitude
    I think it depends too on where you live, Here in the greater NY area, there are several schools with the working student in mind. I would say about half of my class worked. I did do a day program and worked eve. as a unit clerk at a hospital. I know there are some eve. nursing programs though. It WAS tough but doable. You give up sleep and free time for a couple of years.
    What helped a lot was getting some of the classes out of the way before actually starting the nursing program.. By the time I started I had already taken my English classess, A&P's, etc. It really lightens the load.

    Good luck..
  14. by   njbikernurse
    Are you by any chance already an LPN??? If so, Excelsior College offers a distance learning program for an ADN degree. It's very tough unless you're self-motivated and can comprehend nursing textbooks without a lot of help. It's www.excelsior.edu in case you're interested.

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