What More Responsibilites Do RN's Have? - page 2

I keep reading that RN's have a lot more responsibilities (and may have even posted that myself after listening to others) than LPN's do. What are the additional responsibilities? I read that... Read More

  1. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from Myxel67
    The classic statement of the difference between the RN and the LPN is that the LPN learns HOW, but the RN learns HOW and WHY.

    Critical thinking skills are not unique to registered nurses. You can't run a household and raise children without critical thinking skills.
    I was taught that in so many words as well. In school, my professor said that the LPN's role is "what you see, then what you do, with alittle of why" and that the RN gets more theory. I admit that I don't always see it that way, but that was because I have seen some wacked out RN (not saying the nurse is wacked out because they hold the title RN, but because they were incompetent nurses from the jump) do some wild things.

    We were taught critical thinking in our scope of practice as well, just keeping in mind that we were taught within our specific scope of practice. You are right, critical thinking goes across the waters, so to speak.
  2. by   pepperann35
    Quote from crissrn27
    Around here LPNs are being phased out of the hospital setting, mostly LPNs work in staff nurse positions in the LTC setting. There used to be LPNs in management roles in LTC but that seems to be going away also. I was a LPN for awhile in LTC and did everything an RN could do in that role (staff nurse), but as a RN supervisor in LTC I did a lot of things for the LPNs that they couldn't do such as abt IV's, PICC flush, initial assessments, pronouncing deceased residents, etc. Depending on where you went to nursing school, there are certain things that aren't taught to LPNs in all schools, such as critical thinking skills, etc. In this area, it seems the LPN classes are more skills driven. Hope this helps!
    I am a LPN in LTC. I am the night shift supervisor. I can do all of the above mentioned things.
  3. by   P_RN
    It all falls to what do YOU want. In SC LPNs with extra training hang meds to central lines, start and maintain peripheral lines, monitor but not hang blood and blood products. I learned a whole lot from LPNs and taught a whole lot back to new RNs. By state law LPNs can only gather information and report it to the RN (in other words can't assess). That's straining at straws IMHO. What do YOU want. My biggie is RN's advance as far as they can, ladder wise and pay wise. In SC LPNs can only be a 1 or a 2. RNs can be up to a 5. I worked with some fantastic nurses......of all shapes sizes, accents and titles.
  4. by   pepperann35
    Quote from P_RN
    It all falls to what do YOU want. In SC LPNs with extra training hang meds to central lines, start and maintain peripheral lines, monitor but not hang blood and blood products. I learned a whole lot from LPNs and taught a whole lot back to new RNs. By state law LPNs can only gather information and report it to the RN (in other words can't assess). That's straining at straws IMHO. What do YOU want. My biggie is RN's advance as far as they can, ladder wise and pay wise. In SC LPNs can only be a 1 or a 2. RNs can be up to a 5. I worked with some fantastic nurses......of all shapes sizes, accents and titles.
    Wow, thanks for that info. I did not realize things were that different in other states!
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    I can add that LPNs (at least in New York City) also do a great deal of teaching in the clinic setting. At times, if a patient is newly diagnosed for diabetes, for example, an RN is supposed to do the initial teaching, but because they are usually occupied doing other things, we have to check their A1c. If it is below 9, an LPN can teach them...higher, they want an RN, even better if she is a certified teacher for diabetes management. It really does depend on the location and the facility that makes or breaks what an LPN is allowed to do.
  6. by   jjjoy
    In places where the LPN role and RN role aren't very different, I don't see why one would choose LPN over RN except for the accessibility and affordability of the program and the time to start working. I could see if LPNs had less responsibility than nurses. Then, one might choose LPN over RN because they didn't want so much responsbility. But that's not the case in most places.

    It just seems strange... go to school for a year less and get less pay... but don't have significantly less responsbility? If LPNs can safely handle their own assignment of patients that parallels an RN, the only difference being that the RN signs off on the initial assessment and hangs blood products, then what exactly is the supposed difference between the two levels of educational preparation such that the LPN is significantly restricted in pay and job opportunities?

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