What makes you nervous about or irritated with a new grad or orientee? - page 12

I've noticed alot of threads lately from new nurses who seemed quite stressed out, which I can totally understand, I've been there for sure. So I thought I'd start a thread from the other POV. This... Read More

  1. by   AliRae
    Quote from Jen2
    ...and then put a lock on it, it now changes your #18g to a #20g, and if you add a J-loop ...
    Call me woefully ignorant if you will, but what's a j-loop? And which bit of the whole setup is the lock? I'm trying to picture an IV without the bits of tubing we use, and I can't figure it out. Maybe we just call things by different names in my neck of the woods?
  2. by   prmenrs


    It's this little gizmo you attach to the IV device.

    ETA- dang. I couldn't get the image to paste!
    Last edit by prmenrs on Jan 21, '07
  3. by   jojotoo
    Quote from Jen2
    Just a thought, and I truly don't even know if this is true or if there is any literature to back this up, but I was taught in TNCC that if you put a #18g IV in the AC and then put a lock on it, it now changes your #18g to a #20g, and if you add a J-loop it will even change it to a #22g. So there is no sense in putting in an IV that large if you add the adaptors. I was just taught that every peice you add makes to gauge smaller. Like I said I'm not even sure if this is correct, but I know that you cannot run a level one rapid infuser through them. I am guilty for never adding a J-loop. Mainly because we don't even have them as stock in the ED, but I always put the lock on.

    Jen, I've taken TNCC three times (over 12 years) and I've never heard this before. In our ER, we add a J-loop (we also call it a T-connector or a pig tail) to all lines that we start. We don't have a Level One Infuser in the ER that I'm in now, but I could almost swear that I've used one before through a J-loop.
  4. by   GardenDove
    EFFECT OF SMALL EXTENSION TUBING ON INTRAVENOUS FLOW RATE
    http://www.cja-jca.org/cgi/content/full/49/suppl_1/A4
  5. by   jojotoo
    Quote from GardenDove
    EFFECT OF SMALL EXTENSION TUBING ON INTRAVENOUS FLOW RATE
    http://www.cja-jca.org/cgi/content/full/49/suppl_1/A4

    This is just amazing. I can't believe that I've never heard of this before.

    The above study indicates that they were measuring flow via gravity. Does anyone know if it would make any difference using an IV pump?
  6. by   GardenDove
    I don't know, I just found that by accident. It indicates that if someone is hemmoraghing, it would be good to take the extension tubing off to administer fluids quickly, for instance when using pressure bags.
  7. by   Curious1alwys
    Quote from lizz
    Man ... I wished my preceptor was like that. Instead, I was ridiculed for asking questions. I'd always get comments like: didn't they teach you anything in nursing school?

    I always do things the way the RN's want it to be done and don't argue. I figure I'll have plenty of time to do things my way when I'm on my own. But ... some of them just want to put you down no matter what.

    One time it was an hour before the shift change and I was pretty tired. She had the MAR and I needed to give some morphine. I'd been giving the same dose all day but, I wanted to make sure I was remembering it correctly since I was tired.

    Since she had the book ... I casually asked ... this is the dose ... right? Man ... she jumped on me: don't you remember the dose? I said: yeah ... but I'm kinda tired and just want to make sure.

    Her response was: You need to develop more stamina!

    Ok ... I was just trying to be safe but ... whatever.


    Alot of nurses act like this. I ask many, many questions, because I always want to know WHY (the logic behind things). Sometimes I think they don't know the answer so they just act smart. You are not alone, Lizz. I have had more experiences like this in NS than positive ones. Like you said, "whatever"
  8. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from thrashej
    Alot of nurses act like this. I ask many, many questions, because I always want to know WHY (the logic behind things). Sometimes I think they don't know the answer so they just act smart. You are not alone, Lizz. I have had more experiences like this in NS than positive ones. Like you said, "whatever"
    I think you both might be as surprised as I was to find that many new nurses don't really want to know the "why" behind something.

    I'd so much rather have preceptees like you.
  9. by   prmenrs
    In the few times I precepted, I've been asked why? about something, and realized that there was a good, scientific rationale for doing it that way, but I'll be danged if I can remember WHAT THE HECK IT WAS!!
  10. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from prmenrs
    In the few times I precepted, I've been asked why? about something, and realized that there was a good, scientific rationale for doing it that way, but I'll be danged if I can remember WHAT THE HECK IT WAS!!

    ...and of course, that's your cue to say, "Gee, I forgot. Let me show you how to look it up."

    Teach 'em how to fish.
  11. by   Agnus
    One of the complaints I see repeated here is New nurses who argue. When I started nursing my preceptor corrected my on the way to draw up insulin. I disagreed. Then she asked another RN and the second RN agreed with her. I was new they had been doing this for years. So they were righ and I was wrong. I checked my sources over and over and found new sources. They all confirmed what I had said with the same ratonal.

    What should bug us is OLD nurse who will not listen to a new nurse. We have been out of school. These young'uns have it all fresh and often the lastest information. They are actively studying what we long ago forgot. I can't stand the dangerous nurse who is sooo experienced that she doesn't realize she could learn something.
  12. by   Agnus
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    ...and of course, that's your cue to say, "Gee, I forgot. Let me show you how to look it up."

    Teach 'em how to fish.
    Go one further. Find it out yourself. Likely the new nurse will look it up as she is used to doing this being fresh out of school. You need to know why. At least I do.
  13. by   Ruby Vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]that's one thing i like about precepting: when they ask you "why" and you have to figure out if you know it well enough to explain it. nothing fixes something in your mind better than knowing you're going to have to explain it to a newbie!

    but it irks the crap out of me when a newbie wants to argue with me about how to do something after i've explained my rationale for doing it my way. please, get yourself oriented and off probation before you start insisting upon everyone doing it your way, and please have references and rationale before you insist!

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