What made you want to be a nurse?

  1. This is my first time posting, so hi everyone!

    I'm trying to decide if I want to start nursing school this August or if I should major in something else. I love the idea of being a nurse, but at the same time, I'm worried I won't be good enough or that I'll hate nursing. What made you decide to be a nurse? What's the thing you love most about nursing?

    Thank you to everyone who answers!
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   klone
    Because I wanted to become a lactation consultant, and at the time, becoming a nurse was the easiest/fastest way to do so.
  4. by   Jules A
    Hi and welcome! There is a recent thread about what nurses love about nursing that you might want to check out. I did it as a second career thinking it would offer a a variety of work settings, flexible schedule plus a decent income and it has exceeded my expectations in all three. I was very interested in medicine but didn't have a burning desire to become a nurse or help people however helping people is a very pleasant aspect of what I do. Good luck with whatever you decide.
  5. by   TheCommuter
    What made you decide to be a nurse?
    At the time, nursing seemed like the quickest route to a career that offered a solid middle income, flexible schedule, occupational mobility, and the potential for educational advancement.

    Thus, I entered nursing for practical reasons. My heart was not oozing with altruism or a yearning to ease the suffering of humankind.
  6. by   not.done.yet
    My oldest son died of cancer at the age of 13 and I needed a way to carry everything that happened to us through that journey and to feel as if all that pain and suffering we went through was not for nothing. I was empty and scared and didn't even really know how to relate to a life without hospitals anymore. Four months after he died I started my pre-req's. It has been ten years now since his death. I have been an RN for five and just finished my MSN.

    What I love about being a nurse is being present for people in a meaningful way when they need it.
  7. by   Here.I.Stand
    Hi Molly!
    What Do You Love About Nursing?

    Here's a link to my reply on another thread; the first part refers to the original poster who was told she would by faculty that she would have no life outside of nursing school (or something to that effect). The second paragraph lists what I enjoy about nursing.

    Why I decided to become a nurse was a combo of wanting to help people and job security (at least more secure than that of a classical musician.) I had worked as a CNA since graduating high school; my school offered the class as an elective so I took it. I needed to make more money than what my church oraganist position/freelancing for weddings offered, but I didn't want to work in retail or food service. But I digress. I really enjoyed being a CNA so decided to continue my education in that direction.

    I highly recommend becoming a CNA. You'll get your feet wet with performing very basic nursing tasks and at the same time see the RN/LPN working in their roles.
  8. by   MrNurse(x2)
    I loved first aid as a Boy Scout, wanted to look into medicine (too long), paramedic (low pay), when my BIL was admitted for T-cell carcinoma when I was 13. I saw male nurses who weren't gay (sorry, realize that the 70's were a whole different time, don't judge by today's standards) and functioning in what appeared to be an autonomous role. I chose to be a nurse then. It was difficult in high school given the aforementioned prejudice and I wasn't even allowed to join the future nurses club in HS. I was one of two males in my class and the only one that graduated. Wouldn't look back. Should I not need to work tomorrow, I would volunteer as a nurse, nothing I would rather do.
  9. by   datalore
    Overwhelming fascination with medicine and health care since early childhood... and a strong aversion to the bureaucratic bullcrap physicians deal with in their roles. Briefly considered being a PA, but the more nurses I observed in the hospital, the more I liked the nurse's (and NP's) role and went the RN route. Love it.
  10. by   Everline
    I needed surgery. I encountered nurses who made my hospital stay and my recovery easier and I encountered nurses who made me feel bad. I wanted to be one of the "good" nurses. Having said that, now that I am a nurse, my perspective on my time in the hospital back then has changed, as has my assessment of what makes a nurse "good" or "bad".
  11. by   AgentBeast
    Seemed like a good idea at the time.
  12. by   OrganizedChaos
    Quote from TheCommuter
    At the time, nursing seemed like the quickest route to a career that offered a solid middle income, flexible schedule, occupational mobility, and the potential for educational advancement.

    Thus, I entered nursing for practical reasons. My heart was not oozing with altruism or a yearning to ease the suffering of humankind.
    This this this.
  13. by   AJJKRN
    Quote from not.done.yet
    My oldest son died of cancer at the age of 13 and I needed a way to carry everything that happened to us through that journey and to feel as if all that pain and suffering we went through was not for nothing. I was empty and scared and didn't even really know how to relate to a life without hospitals anymore. Four months after he died I started my pre-req's. It has been ten years now since his death. I have been an RN for five and just finished my MSN.

    What I love about being a nurse is being present for people in a meaningful way when they need it.
    (((not.done.yet)))...sniffle...
  14. by   KiusLady
    Disclaimer: I'm not a nurse, a baby nurse, or even a "fetal" nurse (as in I'm not even in nursing school yet, but I've taken my pre-req's and will be slamming through gen-eds this spring and summer. I'll know in a couple months if I made it into the nursing program, which will start this fall).

    That all being said: Nursing certainly wasn't my first profession of choice. So much to know, so much responsibility, so scary. Paired with my general dislike for our grand medical establishment (doctors who don't listen, policies that seem to defy common sense when it comes to patient care, chronic unsafe staffing ratios, etc, etc).

    Despite all that, I've been drawn to the healing arts for a very long time. I like helping people.
    I've been a doula for about ten years now and the two times in my professional career that I've been between jobs, I've always come really close to getting schooling in some medical care field; but I've always gotten a job again in my first field of study before getting too far.

    Working as an in-home caregiver between jobs five years ago taught me a lot and I absolutely loved the work (even the icky parts). Caring for my rapidly-ailing father-in-law in the last month he was able to live at home two years ago also opened my eyes that I might just have it in me to pull off being a nurse. I was alone for most of that and had to deal with a couple non-life-threatening emergencies that - though certainly not fun - proved to me I had the resolve to handle such situations.

    Despite all that, it wasn't till I was knocked down with a debilitating illness early last year that I *finally* decided to seriously pursue nursing. I had a lot of downtime while recovering, so (because I soooo can't sit at home doing nothing) I applied to a local community college, got accepted and am currently barreling my way towards getting my Associate degree.

    The thought of being a nurse is still utterly terrifying (perhaps more so now that I'm gaining a little more knowledge as to just what I'm getting into), but that's a common feeling from what I've read. I want to do it. I want to help people. We'll see how it goes!!

    Good luck in your journey as well!

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