What kind of error puts a license at risk? - page 6

I am new to all this and I have seen a lot of posts about med errors. I know it happens alot, but what kind of med error would cause a facility to present it to the board? I was once told if you... Read More

  1. by   msdobson
    Quote from chuck1234
    They will go straight to hell!

    Uh....yeah....:uhoh21:
  2. by   k.lvn.mom
    Quote from msdobson
    Right!

    What she said.

    And don't EVER mistake Tylenol P.M. for the garden variety Tylenol. The BON will snatch your license away quicker than you can say, "Damn, I should have used Bayer!"

    You were warned...
    Why is this?
  3. by   TazziRN
    If you take Tylenol PM it will make you drowsy.....it's got diphenhydramine in it. You would be considered as working under the influence.
  4. by   Lacie
    Protect Yourself! Defending Your License to Practice
    http://www.nursingceu.com/courses/147/index_nceu.html

    A really good read here for any nursing student or experienced nurse! Well worth printing out and taking the time to read.
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jun 30, '07 : Reason: added article title
  5. by   k.lvn.mom
    Quote from TazziRN
    If you take Tylenol PM it will make you drowsy.....it's got diphenhydramine in it. You would be considered as working under the influence.
    I thought that this meant for the patient not the nurse....oops!
    Thanks for clarification
  6. by   marylyric
    Quote from crazystudent
    see what I mean?? Tazzi RN, I was secerely thanking you, I'm sorry this came out wrong.
    I just made a drug error. I was following non-license personnel, and the mar was written somewhat confusing. Librium was being titrated down. I gave 2 instead of 1
    I am becoming concerned because following non -license personnel is not good and there is only so much you can do to ensure safety.
  7. by   celery
    This forum is such a good resource for us!!
    Last edit by celery on Jun 29, '07
  8. by   celery
    Quote from TheCommuter

    3. A mother's BP was 70/40 after giving birth. She was bleeding heavily, but the doctor and nurse did nothing. She died, and the nurse lost her license.
    So what did the doctor order in this situation and why is that he RN's fault? She can only do so much. She must have been smoking a cigarette, eh?
  9. by   MelodyRNurse
    Sincerely (lol, ooopps):trout:
  10. by   jetscreamer101
    Quote from wantobern
    oh my god, i didn't know this!!!! :smackingf thanks for the info.
    but i work in ltc and if a patient is out of medication, nurses borrow the medication from another patient who takes the same medication. is this the same thing as described above?

    i do believe that taking someone elses meds to give to someone else is considered diversion. not that most places will report it, but it's still diversion.
  11. by   grace90
    Quote from jetscreamer101
    I do believe that taking someone elses meds to give to someone else is considered diversion. Not that most places will report it, but it's still diversion.
    I hope this isn't considered stealing.... or diversion I mean... a practice a lot of nurses I work with do is 'borrowing' meds such as Tylenol, Tylenol ES or Zofran from one pt's drawer to give to another pt who -does- have it ordered but doesn't have any in their med drawer and pharmacy takes *forever* sometimes to get it to us so we do this so we, and the pt, don't have to wait.
  12. by   EmmaG
    An elderly patient had been having a CVA (stroke) for 8 hours, but it went undetected because the nurse failed to do her rounds all shift. The nurse voluntarily surrendered her license for 'failure to assess,' because she admitted to not going into the patient's room all shift.
    On the morning after my mother's (12 hour) surgery, she was moved to a private room. I stayed with her during her hospitalization, and on that second night NO ONE entered her room from 10:30 pm until after 7 am the following day. NO one. I was awake all night, the door was closed tight and never once opened the entire night shift. I monitored her, helped her with bathroom issues, etc. The next day I complained to the doc that no one had been in to assess her, had not so much as peeked in the door, and his response was that nurses there were not required to make rounds during their shifts.

    I have often wished I could read the 11-7 nurse's notes for that night...
  13. by   jetscreamer101
    I have often wished I could read the 11-7 nurse's notes for that night...[/quote]


    You can, with her permission, review her medical file from that stay. I found it interesting when I've read my files from hospital stays.

close