What is your biggest nursing pet peeve?? - page 46

Nurses that are brilliant but do not know the difference between contraindication and contradiction!!!!!!!:rotfl: :rotfl:... Read More

  1. by   TweetiePieRN
    Quote from katy_kenemy
    I hate when I am the only aide for 24 pts and the RNs decide to help me, but only a teeny bit and they want tons of credit for it. "I did three of your vital signs!" an RN once said to me, like he wanted me to thank him for this amazing act.
    I understand where you are coming from since I once was an aide...but you should be glad you even got the RN to do that. At my hospital, we (the RNS)are so inundated with paperwork that we almost never have the time to do any vitals. I guess 3 is better than nothing, huh?
  2. by   elthia
    my biggest peeve right now is the grandson in law of a patient that comes up to the desk at 1030 pm ( and yes he was repeatedly told it was past visiting hours) demanding the right to stay in the room overnight. My reply "according to policy that is only for the critically ill patients in private rooms, the patient is not critically ill per the MD's assessment, and I have no private rooms." Then he states "look I want to speak to the doctor in the hospital about his case, he's not doing well and I want the doctor's opinion.'
    My reply, "I'll be more than happy to have the RN reassess him, but I'm not calling the resident on call unless there is an emergent condition, the resident is not the patient's doctor, and all the resident will say is to call the MD If you want to speak to the MD please call back tomorrow between 8 am and 6 pm." He throws a fit, wants the primary attending to come in, "He's completely going down hill, he's had 3 liters out of his NG tube, I'm a med student and you don't let the sun go down on a small bowel obstruction." I smile sweetly and say, "you are NOT listed as the NOK, but I'll be more than happy to call my house supervisor if you want to place a complaint, but if you are in med school, then you should be completely aware about HIPPA and patient confidentiality ." The supervisor did have to come up.
    oh and the NG output was 300 ml's, and the pt had been sucking on ice chips, he had an ileus not an SBO.
    I feel sorry for the nurses at the place where he does his residency.
  3. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    I heard this a LOT when i was an aide. Heard it a lot from the students in a local BSN program. i always love to ask those that make that remark "Well then why ARE you going to school, then?"
    As a new grad Diploma RN, I worked with a clueless BSN grad who told me 'in a few years you'll be passing bedpans and I'll be the nurse telling you to do it. '

    She believed the bunk her school indoctrinated her with; and was so amazed that the hospital let her go in 3 months! of course this news was greeted with a smile from us lowly diploma, AD, and LPN's who could do the work.
  4. by   mattsmom81
    "I kind of laugh and get a lil bit irritated when people say "sugar diabetes", instead of, just 'diabetes". Why do they feel the need to say sugar?"

    Its a common old timey expression. The 'test' was to taste the urine...it was like 'sugar' thus 'sugar diabetes'.
  5. by   teeituptom
    Quote from mattsmom81
    "I kind of laugh and get a lil bit irritated when people say "sugar diabetes", instead of, just 'diabetes". Why do they feel the need to say sugar?"

    Its a common old timey expression. The 'test' was to taste the urine...it was like 'sugar' thus 'sugar diabetes'.

    Only you and I are old enough to remember when
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    The nurse that flirts shamelessly with the surgeon (Oh, DAWKTER, TEE HEE HE HE HEE!)

    It's unprofessional, not to mention tacky. This is typically the nurse who's charting isn't finished when the 2 hour case is.

    (This was not a good day.)
  7. by   chiefswife
    As a new graduate RN, it really bugs me when the more seasoned nurses forget what it was like to be new.

    Yes, I ask a lot of questions. No, I don't know anything (I just graduated)! I'm looking to you to help me, that is why you are my preceptor! Oh, and yes, I do like getting a "good job" or a pat on the back once in a while - I'm sure you did too when you were new.
  8. by   krob0729
    [QUOTE=mattsmom81Its a common old timey expression. The 'test' was to taste the urine...it was like 'sugar' thus 'sugar diabetes'. [/QUOTE]

    Ewwwwww!!!!!!! :uhoh21: TMI
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Glad the times have changed, i really wouldn't want to have a sip of that.
  10. by   Blackcat99
    Nursing staff who constantly complain bitterly about how horrible their job is and how much they hate their job and how they can't stand it another minute!!! :angryfire It seems these types never leave their so-called "horrible jobs."
  11. by   katy_kenemy
    Quote from TweetiePieRN
    I understand where you are coming from since I once was an aide...but you should be glad you even got the RN to do that. At my hospital, we (the RNS)are so inundated with paperwork that we almost never have the time to do any vitals. I guess 3 is better than nothing, huh?
    not at my hospital. the nurses have plenty of time to do all their own vitals if they want (and the real old time nurses do.... without complaining!-- when i am super busy, that is). no, mostly the new RNs sit around talking about their pregnancy... all our lazy RNs are pregnant right now. (is there a correlation? could i do a study?).
  12. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from teeituptom
    Only you and I are old enough to remember when

    Yeah you're right Tom...
  13. by   fab4fan
    Quote from grimmy
    [font=book antiqua]
    the word "orientate" has come into the lexicon as a misnomer - it is an incorrect usage for the word "orient." and the pronunciation for centimeter as "sontimeter" is from the french pronunciation of the word. the transition has to do with the mixture of generations using the word, some with the american-english pronunciation "sentimeter" vs. french "sontimeter." if we consider how many procedures' names have foreign origins, and the way americans pronounce (or mispronounce, depending upon your perspective) this sort of transition will probably continue for some time. the french pronunciation may come from french or french-canadians who pioneered some obstetric standards - lamaze comes to mind, but i might be wrong.
    when someone says "orientate," right away i want to scream. same goes for "preventative," another word that's been adopted, wrongly, into popular vocabulary (it's "preventive").

    and anyone who says his pt. is going to "nucular medicine" is cruisin' for a bruisin'.

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