What is your biggest nursing pet peeve?? - page 45

Nurses that are brilliant but do not know the difference between contraindication and contradiction!!!!!!!:rotfl: :rotfl:... Read More

  1. by   UM Review RN

    I learned it > 10 yrs ago in school and have yet to see any of it in text form and don't work w/too many people now who use them. I really don't see how they could be correct. What dictionary are they in?

    Gee, did you try dictionary.com?

    2 entries found for orientated.
    o-ri-en-tate ( P ) Pronunciation Key (r-n-tt, -n-, r-)
    v. o-ri-en-tat-ed, o-ri-en-tat-ing, o-ri-en-tates

    5 entries found for dilatation.
    dil-a-ta-tion ( P ) Pronunciation Key (dl-tshn, dl-)
    n.

    The act or process of expanding; dilation.
    The condition of being expanded or stretched.
    A dilated formation or part.
    Medicine. The condition of being abnormally enlarged or dilated, as of an organ, orifice, or tubular structure: dilatation of the stomach. Also called dilation.



    And of course, the lowly centimeter always seems to be mispronounced as "sontimeter" by medical professionals. I'm not sure, but I believe that the case of the centimeter is a little like the word "February," which is generally mispronouced so frequently as "Feb-YU-aree" that it's become an accepted pronunciation. In any case, Wikipedia cites the word "centimeter" as a word that is "in transition." To what or where, heaven only knows, but I'm sure that nothing-if-not-reactionary medical professionals will keep "sohntimeter" alive for many more generations.
  2. by   mcg02
    Quote from NS_RN
    Full code patients who are terminally ill , have end stage disease or are over the age of 80!
    I totally agree with this. I mean I know this may be your mom, but why do CPR on a 85 pound 90 year old female???????????????
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    my biggest pet peeve is nurses without a sense of humor. there's enough that's awful about this job that a sense of humor is sometimes the only way to get through it.

    my sister is now a "gucci nurse" for kaiser, but years ago she was a travelor in northern california. she was working in the er when they brought in a guy who was enormous and enormously high on something. i'm sure all of you er nurses are familiar with the type -- four cops hanging off of him, and still throwing er staff every which way. they finally got him down and restrained, and it was up to my sister to assess him. she leaned over his face with her brand new littman scope around her neck to ask him a few questions, and he grabbed that scope with his teeth.

    as my sister is telling this story, i'm starting to get an idea where this is going. i start to giggle. she looks annoyed, and tells me "it was a brand new littman."

    "uh-huh," i say, and try to stifle my laughter.

    my sister goes on to tell me about how this guy bit the head off her stethascope, and the docs were trying to pry his mouth open to get it out of his mouth. not to be cheated of what he must now be viewing as a prize of some sort, the patient swallowed it. or tried to. he started struggling to breathe, and someone tried to bag him which made things worse. the guy breaks the restraints and sits up, clutching his throat, and somehow manages to swallow the head of a littman cardiology scope. a brand new one.

    by now i'm turning blue and about to pee my pants trying to hold in the laughter. sis looks at me, and growls "it's not funny. those things are expensive!"

    "uh-huh," i say. or try to. a little laughter leaks out.

    by the time she's told me about how they had to call in gi service and do an endoscopy to try to retrieve the head of her scope, i can't keep the laughter in anymore, and tears are running down my face. she got to the part about how they couldn't retrieve the head of her scope by endoscopy, and had to send the guy to surgery -- by this time well sedated and fully restrained with cops looking out for him but not hanging off of him. the er docs must have been chafing at her attitude as well, because at the end of her story, they presented her with the head of her stethascope, somewhat the worse for the wear, all gift wrapped from the or. i'm rolling on the floor, holding my sides and laughing like a hyena.

    i think she's still mad at me, and that's been about 20 years.

    ruby (you gotta have a sense of humor to survive!)
  4. by   grimmy
    Quote from angie o'plasty, rn
    gee, did you try dictionary.com?

    2 entries found for orientated.
    o-ri-en-tate ( p ) pronunciation key (r-n-tt, -n-, r-)
    v. o-ri-en-tat-ed, o-ri-en-tat-ing, o-ri-en-tates

    5 entries found for dilatation.
    dil-a-ta-tion ( p ) pronunciation key (dl-tshn, dl-)
    n.

    the act or process of expanding; dilation.
    the condition of being expanded or stretched.
    a dilated formation or part.
    medicine. the condition of being abnormally enlarged or dilated, as of an organ, orifice, or tubular structure: dilatation of the stomach. also called dilation.



    and of course, the lowly centimeter always seems to be mispronounced as "sontimeter" by medical professionals. i'm not sure, but i believe that the case of the centimeter is a little like the word "february," which is generally mispronouced so frequently as "feb-yu-aree" that it's become an accepted pronunciation. in any case, wikipedia cites the word "centimeter" as a word that is "in transition." to what or where, heaven only knows, but i'm sure that nothing-if-not-reactionary medical professionals will keep "sohntimeter" alive for many more generations.
    [font=book antiqua]
    the word "orientate" has come into the lexicon as a misnomer - it is an incorrect usage for the word "orient." and the pronunciation for centimeter as "sontimeter" is from the french pronunciation of the word. the transition has to do with the mixture of generations using the word, some with the american-english pronunciation "sentimeter" vs. french "sontimeter." if we consider how many procedures' names have foreign origins, and the way americans pronounce (or mispronounce, depending upon your perspective) this sort of transition will probably continue for some time. the french pronunciation may come from french or french-canadians who pioneered some obstetric standards - lamaze comes to mind, but i might be wrong.
  5. by   kadokin
    angie o'plasty and grimmy,
    Thanks for the education. I stand corrected. It still bothers me, though, it just sounds so affected.
    kadokin
  6. by   sarahRN482
    When people cap off the air release valve/tube on an NG tube. That little blue tube sticking off the side is there for a reason!
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from sarahRN482
    When people cap off the air release valve/tube on an NG tube. That little blue tube sticking off the side is there for a reason!
    Or they try to give meds through it and ruin the sump action...<sigh> I work with ICU nurses who still try to do this.
  8. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from kadokin
    nurses who tell me they are not "into" bedpans and that sort of nursing(usually green or students). I have to laugh behind my hand and think to myself, "well then why didn't you go to law school or some such, it's part of the job, duh" And, by the way, I don't believe I have ever met anyone who was actually "into" bedpans and every thing that goes w/it. If I did meet someone like that, I'd run the other way.
    Oh this reminds me of the nurses who sneer and say 'I didn't go to school for 4 years to pass bedpans or do other aide work.' Yes they are out there.
  9. by   kimmcgill
    :chuckle :roll :chuckle :lol_hitti

    OOHHHH......I think I just peed my pants

    Quote from rn500
    Oh - one more... I work in OB, and I just love it when a pt asks for pain med, and when I am about to give it they ask "WILL THIS HURT THE BABY?"
    ???????????????????
    Yes, it's going to kill your baby, that's why we give it to you!!!
    Or maybe I should say...
    WHAT??!! Your're PREGNANT?? For God's sake why didn't you tell me????? I can't give this to you, it's poison!!!

    I know, I know... they are right to worry and they are just being protective, but it still make me laugh (inside of course!)
  10. by   fireflyLPN
    I'm still new, but my biggest pet peeve is nurses who while doing a sterile procedure answer their phone, grab their pen to take a note, or fuss with their hair! I mean c'mon!
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Oh this reminds me of the nurses who sneer and say 'I didn't go to school for 4 years to pass bedpans or do other aide work.' Yes they are out there.
    I heard this a LOT when i was an aide. Heard it a lot from the students in a local BSN program. i always love to ask those that make that remark "Well then why ARE you going to school, then?"
  12. by   katy_kenemy
    I hate when I am the only aide for 24 pts and the RNs decide to help me, but only a teeny bit and they want tons of credit for it. "I did three of your vital signs!" an RN once said to me, like he wanted me to thank him for this amazing act.
  13. by   Zoomer
    1. customer service. I once told a patient who complained about "the service" that she didn't have to leave a tip.

    2. Not starting report on time. Also since we pick our own assignments in the ICU where I work some nurses come in early and expect report after they have picked out their choice assignment (usually the patients that were bathed by night shift are sedated on the vent, never the confused gomers) then I have to give report all over again when the rest of the nurses get there and realize what an unfair assignment it is

    3. Lateness. Some nurses are always 5 minutes late then get ticked off when they get the "leftovers". Leave your frickin house 10 minutes earlier!!!

    4. Nurses who don't answer call lights or who will sit and ignore IV's beeping or vent alarms because it's not their patient. I call it selective hearing.

    5. Constant negativity. If this hospital is such a lousy place then why have you worked here for 20 years.

    6. sharing all the negativity with the new nurse I am orienting.

    7 Smokers who take 5 or 6 breaks a night. Believe me that 5 minutes you tell me you are going to be gone is actually 15 minutes and I don't appreciate haveing to cover for you every single time, and why is it half the staff expect to be able to leave at the same time?

    8. Phone calls from "family" who get angry when you won't tell them all the details of their brother-in-laws illness.

    9. People who don't think the visiting hours apply to them.

    10. People who bring their 2 and 3 year old kids to visit and stay unitll well past the kids bedtime. Also let the kids roll all over the floors or drink out of grandmas cup. Not to mention running up and down the halls. I once had a visitor leave a 6 year old with grandma for several hours because she didn't have a baby sitter. No reason why grandma can't take care of junior just because she has had major abdominal surgery.

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