What is your biggest nursing pet peeve?? - page 37

Nurses that are brilliant but do not know the difference between contraindication and contradiction!!!!!!!:rotfl: :rotfl:... Read More

  1. by   CoffeeRTC
    This is minor but still a peeve...Not restocking the treatment carts with supplies or refilling the med carts. Years back as a new nurse I remeber an older LPN tore me a new one for not cleaning and restocking the med cart with cups, spoons etc. I don't expect much, just empty your trash...I will stock my cart first thing.
  2. by   TBLPN
    BIGGEST: "Oh, that's NOT my patient"!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Drives me insane!!!!!!!!!!!:angryfire
  3. by   LPN1974
    One of my pet peeves are nurses who will do write overs on the narcotic books, going over entries other nurses have made to make corrections.
    I HATE that. If something needs correcting the nurse who made the error should correct it, and lined thru, never written over.
  4. by   Kitkat23
    :angryfire My other pet peeve is when nurses try to get CNAs to pass meds or turn off feeding tube and IV alarms. Or mess with oxygen tank dials. One time when I was a pool aide, one of the nurses asked me to give a resident her aspirin, since she was busy. I told her firmly that I was an aide and couldn't give out meds. She got snappy with me and said, "It's only Advil! I have tons of paperwork to do." But she did it anyway.

    Then I was at another facilty as a pool aide, and one nurse expected me to shut off the feeding tube alarm. She claimed I bothered her when I was busy; she was filing her nails at the nurses station. I wasn't going to risk my license to turn off the feeding tube alarm. Heck, she went to nursing school to learn how to turn off alarms and determine the problem. It's her job, not mine. I wasn't going to risk losing my license. My CNA instructor always said, "If it's out of your scope of practice, don't do it." Doing skills out of the scope of practice in clinical could get the student aide kicked out of the course. :angryfire
  5. by   mamabear
    Quote from Kitkat23
    :angryfire My other pet peeve is when nurses try to get CNAs to pass meds or turn off feeding tube and IV alarms. Or mess with oxygen tank dials. One time when I was a pool aide, one of the nurses asked me to give a resident her aspirin, since she was busy. I told her firmly that I was an aide and couldn't give out meds. She got snappy with me and said, "It's only Advil! I have tons of paperwork to do." But she did it anyway.

    Then I was at another facilty as a pool aide, and one nurse expected me to shut off the feeding tube alarm. She claimed I bothered her when I was busy; she was filing her nails at the nurses station. I wasn't going to risk my license to turn off the feeding tube alarm. Heck, she went to nursing school to learn how to turn off alarms and determine the problem. It's her job, not mine. I wasn't going to risk losing my license. My CNA instructor always said, "If it's out of your scope of practice, don't do it." Doing skills out of the scope of practice in clinical could get the student aide kicked out of the course. :angryfire
    Excellent advice! However, aspirin and Advil are not the same. Aspirin is, well, aspirin. Advil is ibuprofen
  6. by   Kitkat23
    Quote from mamabear
    Excellent advice! However, aspirin and Advil are not the same. Aspirin is, well, aspirin. Advil is ibuprofen
    :uhoh21: Oops, my bad. Aspirin is white, like Bayer or Tylenol. Advil is ibuprofen and so is Motrin IB. That nurse asked me to give a resident her aspirin and when I refused politely; she snapped, "It's only advil!" I forget that advil isn't aspirin. I do take it a lot during flus, colds, and headaches. Motrin is good too. But aides should never administer meds at all; especially advil and ibuprofen. :angryfire I guess nurses love to test aides; especially the new ones out of school.
  7. by   Kitkat23
    :angryfire What makes me mad is that I've seen aides cut corners and use shortcuts. As a pool aide, my short week in a nursing home, and my hospital volunteer job, I've seen them throw dirty linens on the floor, do pericare and linen change without gloves, or they use the same gloves for the next patient. They either don't wash their hands or wash them improperly. I've gotten fired last May at a nursing home for not going "fast enough" on third shift. For god's sake, I've only been there a week; that's not giving me a chance. I was still a rookie.

    Plus after a few days; I was picking up speed and getting with the system. I was doing my rounds in 20-45 minutes. The time I took 45 minutes was when I had a resident with 4 bouts of diarrhea. I had to clean her 4 times and do 2 total beds on her. She was covered in it and it took awhile. The aide who was training me was always picking on me; saying I was too slow and that rounds are 10-15 minutes. She admitted that she leaves residents who are wet/soiled again for the next round!

    She got me fired after a week saying I couldn't pick up and I was too slow. I was just doing my job and the right thing. I wished I brought up my rude trainer to the supervisor. She had made me dumb and uncomfortable, but I didn't say anything because I didn't want to look like a troublemaker or something. Plus the DON said rounds are 10 minutes on grave shift and that was final.

    I've heard the stories from aides saying that if they didn't "shortcut", that their rounds would take forever. I hear the best way to gain speed is experience and repetition of quality care, not cutting corners. Cutting corners could hurt a resident, the aide, and cause infections. I think that's a pet peeve and I just want to do the right thing as an aide and when I become a PCT. :angryfire I went to CNA school to give proper care, not neglect patients. :angryfire
  8. by   NurseFirst
    Quote from kitkat23
    :angryfire what makes me mad is that i've seen aides cut corners and use shortcuts. as a pool aide, my short week in a nursing home, and my hospital volunteer job, i've seen them throw dirty linens on the floor, do pericare and linen change without gloves, or they use the same gloves for the next patient. they either don't wash their hands or wash them improperly. i've gotten fired last may at a nursing home for not going "fast enough" on third shift. for god's sake, i've only been there a week; that's not giving me a chance. i was still a rookie.

    plus after a few days; i was picking up speed and getting with the system. i was doing my rounds in 20-45 minutes. the time i took 45 minutes was when i had a resident with 4 bouts of diarrhea. i had to clean her 4 times and do 2 total beds on her. she was covered in it and it took awhile. the aide who was training me was always picking on me; saying i was too slow and that rounds are 10-15 minutes. she admitted that she leaves residents who are wet/soiled again for the next round!

    she got me fired after a week saying i couldn't pick up and i was too slow. i was just doing my job and the right thing. i wished i brought up my rude trainer to the supervisor. she had made me dumb and uncomfortable, but i didn't say anything because i didn't want to look like a troublemaker or something. plus the don said rounds are 10 minutes on grave shift and that was final.

    i've heard the stories from aides saying that if they didn't "shortcut", that their rounds would take forever. i hear the best way to gain speed is experience and repetition of quality care, not cutting corners. cutting corners could hurt a resident, the aide, and cause infections. i think that's a pet peeve and i just want to do the right thing as an aide and when i become a pct. :angryfire i went to cna school to give proper care, not neglect patients. :angryfire
    okay, there's something i've never quite understood. i'm gonna look really stupid here, but why can't you throw dirty linens on the floor? i've never done it, because i've been told not to, but, really, what is the harm? (someone probably told me once, and i've forgotten...)

    i'm not sure i've ever done a linen change with gloves, but then, i've never had wet spots that i couldn't avoid. i'll have to think about this. (i'm sorry; i was a paramedic before aids and i think the only thing in the ambulance that had gloves was the ob kit--meaning, gloves were extremely rarely used.)

    not to be a troublemaker, but, in a way, i can see the rationale for doing rounds every 10 minutes, and leaving a soiled pt for the "next round". it's a matter of priorities. what is the risk of a pt being soiled for a few more minutes vs. missing someone who has stopped breathing, or has developed respiratory problems, or sudden confusion? hard choices, to be sure.

    nursefirst
  9. by   Thunderwolf
    The loud, intrusive, obnoxious and unrealistic family member who commands, demands and expects all attention and time to his/her significant other/patient without regard to other patients needs or rights (like the room mate) and throws a major tempor tantrum when it doesn't occur johnnie on the spot...especially when that family member is a health care provider him/herself!!! Can I say......Personality Disorder? Yes, I think I can.
  10. by   KrisRNwannabe
    I am still a student but I have come up with a couple that get me!!

    1: CNAs who treat the students like crap. ie hiding BP machine in their patients bathroom, so we can't do ours. also when they spend 20 minutes at the other end of the hallway complaining to another CNA about the students, then ask us to help her with vitals because she is behind.

    2: Family who think they are the patients and want the world. or the ones who think they no more than us or the doctors.

    3: Nurses who think because students have some of their patients that they can hide for the rest of the day and then when we need them (because our instructor has students on 2 floors) they are no where to found!!

    4: This whole customer service/customer is always right crap. HELLO! this is a hospital not walmart!!!
  11. by   tiroka03
    My question would be, What is happening for the rest of the time inbetween rounds? My aides do rounds every 2 hours, and of course anwer lights,and check on some people more often. But, a lot of time they are sitting there waiting. If your whole aim is to finish in 10 mkns regardless of what you find out there, something is very wrong. Sounds like you have your priorities right. The facilitie is wrong.

    QUOTE=Kitkat23]:angryfire What makes me mad is that I've seen aides cut corners and use shortcuts. As a pool aide, my short week in a nursing home, and my hospital volunteer job, I've seen them throw dirty linens on the floor, do pericare and linen change without gloves, or they use the same gloves for the next patient. They either don't wash their hands or wash them improperly. I've gotten fired last May at a nursing home for not going "fast enough" on third shift. For god's sake, I've only been there a week; that's not giving me a chance. I was still a rookie.

    Plus after a few days; I was picking up speed and getting with the system. I was doing my rounds in 20-45 minutes. The time I took 45 minutes was when I had a resident with 4 bouts of diarrhea. I had to clean her 4 times and do 2 total beds on her. She was covered in it and it took awhile. The aide who was training me was always picking on me; saying I was too slow and that rounds are 10-15 minutes. She admitted that she leaves residents who are wet/soiled again for the next round!

    She got me fired after a week saying I couldn't pick up and I was too slow. I was just doing my job and the right thing. I wished I brought up my rude trainer to the supervisor. She had made me dumb and uncomfortable, but I didn't say anything because I didn't want to look like a troublemaker or something. Plus the DON said rounds are 10 minutes on grave shift and that was final.

    I've heard the stories from aides saying that if they didn't "shortcut", that their rounds would take forever. I hear the best way to gain speed is experience and repetition of quality care, not cutting corners. Cutting corners could hurt a resident, the aide, and cause infections. I think that's a pet peeve and I just want to do the right thing as an aide and when I become a PCT. :angryfire I went to CNA school to give proper care, not neglect patients. :angryfire[/QUOTE]
  12. by   Kitkat23
    Quote from NurseFirst
    Okay, there's something I've never quite understood. I'm gonna look really stupid here, but why can't you throw dirty linens on the floor? I've never done it, because I've been told not to, but, really, what is the harm? (Someone probably told me once, and I've forgotten...)

    I'm not sure I've ever done a linen change with gloves, but then, I've never had wet spots that I couldn't avoid. I'll have to think about this. (I'm sorry; I was a paramedic before AIDS and I think the only thing in the ambulance that had gloves was the OB kit--meaning, gloves were extremely rarely used.)

    Not to be a troublemaker, but, in a way, I can see the rationale for doing rounds every 10 minutes, and leaving a soiled pt for the "next round". It's a matter of priorities. What is the risk of a pt being soiled for a few more minutes vs. missing someone who has stopped breathing, or has developed respiratory problems, or sudden confusion? Hard choices, to be sure.

    NurseFirst
    At the facility I worked in, rounds were q2h and I was expected to do them in 10 minutes. I've changed and turned residents that needed it; plus looked in on other patients especially the ones on oxygen. I always made sure they were breathing or had O2 equipment on properly. That aide admitted skipping rooms on the nonincontinent residents saying they're fine and will buzz, but they need to be checked on too.

    My instructor always said never to leave dirty linens on the floor because of infection control and always use a bag, plus you have to break your back bending down to pick up the linens. We always use gloves; if the state comes in, you could be fined big time.
  13. by   LPN1974
    Quote from NurseFirst
    Okay, there's something I've never quite understood. I'm gonna look really stupid here, but why can't you throw dirty linens on the floor? I've never done it, because I've been told not to, but, really, what is the harm? (Someone probably told me once, and I've forgotten...)

    I'm not sure I've ever done a linen change with gloves, but then, I've never had wet spots that I couldn't avoid. I'll have to think about this. (I'm sorry; I was a paramedic before AIDS and I think the only thing in the ambulance that had gloves was the OB kit--meaning, gloves were extremely rarely used.)

    Not to be a troublemaker, but, in a way, I can see the rationale for doing rounds every 10 minutes, and leaving a soiled pt for the "next round". It's a matter of priorities. What is the risk of a pt being soiled for a few more minutes vs. missing someone who has stopped breathing, or has developed respiratory problems, or sudden confusion? Hard choices, to be sure.

    NurseFirst

    Because they can have alot of body fluids on them, mainly poop, pee, maybe blood.
    You wouldn't want that contacting the floor, then having to walk on it and go home with your shoes on.

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