What is your most valuable piece of advice? - page 6

I thought that this would be interesting. As we have new graduates beginning to orient in our respective units, do any of you have any fool-proof pieces of advice for them? If you could only give... Read More

  1. by   slinkeecat
    BEST PIECE OF ADVICE:

    DO NOT SKIMP ON THE SHOES!!!! YOU WILL FOREVER BE ON YOUR FEET..... BE KIND TO YOUR TOOTSIES

    ALWAYS ALWAYS TAKE THE TIME TO TAKE A POTTY BREAK AND PEE. YOU ARE NOT SUPER BLADDER WOMAN..... IF YOU DO NOT WANT TO WEAR DEPENDS WHEN YOU ARE 40, MAKE A PIT STOP AT LEAST TWICE A SHIFT.... (TRUST ME)

    ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT sh*t RUNS DOWN HILL. iF YOUR UNIT MANAGER OR DOCTOR HAS A BAD DAY THEN ODDS ARE LIKELY THAT YOU WILL HAVE A BAD DAY TOO

    SOME TIMES A KIND WORD AND HAND HOLDING CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE

    NEVER VOLUNTEER, EVER!!!!

    ALWAYS REMEMBER YOU HAVE ALLNURSES.COM.

    NEVER EVER ASSUME IT'S JUST APPLE JUICE.( HEE HEE)

    GOOD LUCK!!!!!
  2. by   Fgr8Out
    My advice?

    Be ACCOUNTABLE.... for your words, your actions, for your mistakes and your triumphs.

    We're all human... and at times we all make some sort of error... some serious, some not so serious. I can't tell you the number of times I've run across a nurse who has made some simple mistake... and when I comment on it, I'm barraged with excuses..."we were short staffed... somebody else said...it wouldn't have happened if so-n-so had...." SOOO frustrating to hear this.

    It was day 2 of my work week... it had been a hectic 2 days. I had an assignment different from the one the day before. I was answering questions from the physician of an elderly woman who had a TAH 3 days earlier. He asked about her respiratory status and I replied that I was working with her on coughing/deep breathing. I misunderstood him when he asked if she'd been using her incentive spirometer (it was listed in her orders but not on PCAR) and nodded "affirmative". The physician went in... came back out and said "she doesnt HAVE an I.S." Ooopsie!!!! :imbar

    It seems that several errors over the past few days ... orders not noted properly, etc... resulted in this woman not receiving an incentive spirometer. The doctor wasn't happy. Hell, I wasn't happy that I hadn't noticed the omission. When the doctor bellowed "who is responsible to make sure my orders are followed???" I replied "Nursing is." I went on to say the order had obviously been missed... I ordered an IS immediately and informed the physician that the patient would be instructed to use it as ordered. No... the original problem was not mine... I wasn't around when the original orders were received. BUT... I didn't make a bunch of excuses for why it wasn't done or try to place blame on my fellow Nurses who did miss it. I simply apologized to the physician for the omission and took steps to correct the situation.

    Did I feel like the doctor blamed ME?? No. The doctor was unhappy that his order was missed... period. Did I avert a situation by NOT making excuses for why the incentive spirometer wasn't at the patient's bedside? Absolutely.

    The physician appreciated my conduct and actions... appreciated that I didn't try to blame someone else... appreciated that I didn't voice "it wasn't my fault." Do ALL physicians behave this way? LOL NO!!! BUT... I know *I* was accountable for the situation and it's resolution. I wrote an occurrence report, not to find fault with anyone else, but to document the error.

    Sh** happens.... And yes, you need to CYA, but... you also need to be accountable for the care your patient's receive and be prepared to step in and correct situations that may not be of your own making, but need resolution anyway.

    A bit long-winded... but I hope I've made my position known
  3. by   live4today
    Originally posted by slinkeecat
    BEST PIECE OF ADVICE:

    NEVER EVER ASSUME IT'S JUST APPLE JUICE.( HEE HEE)

    GOOD LUCK!!!!!
    That really cracks me up, slinkeecat!
  4. by   kids
    Always remember your manners.
    Smile even when you don't feel like it.
    Always be truthful.
  5. by   zudy
    Learn all you can about diabetics. No matter what kind of nursing you choose to go into, diabetics are everywhere, and they make for more complicated pts. and, don't be afraid to cry with your pts, and don't forget to love them.:kiss
  6. by   rdhdnrs
    1) If it's wet and it's not yours, wear gloves.
    2) The patient is your employer, not the doc. BE A PATIENT ADVOCATE ABOVE ALL ELSLE.
    3) Pain is what the patient says it is. Treat what they say their pain is, not what you or the doc think it is.
  7. by   pacernurse
    1. Always remember your patients are people no matter how many machines they hooked up to them.

    2. Always ask questions because that's how you learn.

    3. Don't get depressed if you think you're not "making it." Give yourself time to get used to the real world of nursing.

    4. Always take time for yourself, which includes food, bathroom breaks, and fluids. Never bring your work home with you.

    5. Don't ever believe you are less capable than the experienced nurses on your unit. Remember, they were once new too.

    6. Realize early that doctors are jerks and stand up to them. In the long run, they will end up respecting you.

    Good Luck
  8. by   JeannieM
    I love working with new nurses, and student nurses, and I love learning from them everything that they can share with me. I try to share one piece of advice that I learned, painfully, the hard way: never, EVER do anything against your better judgement! The worse mistakes I've made, for my patients, my peers and myself, have been when I've thought, "My gut instinct tells me differently, but because I'm too (pick one or more) busy, tired, strapped for time, I'm going to ignore it." God gave us "critical thinking" as a gift. Love this thread!:kiss JeannieM
  9. by   TrdNur
    Treat everyone as if they were your mother, or your family, and you will never go wrong
  10. by   cactus wren
    Remember that no one ever died from not having a bath
    Even if all vital signs are fine, if a patient says they are going to die....they probably are.
    If the monitor says that your patient is in v-tach, check him before you call a code......he just might be "playing" with his electrodes........happened to me as a newbie...........
  11. by   futureccrn
    1. Learn from more experienced nurses on how to get organized. Organization is key. Don't know how many times I have followed this one RN and have had a lot of things dumped on me simply because she is extremely disorganized.

    2. Carry your "brains" either in your pocket or on a clipboard at all times. It will prove to be invaluable to you when you sit down to do your charting.

    3. Always take time to go to the bathroom. I had a urologist tell me once that you should try to go to the bathroom every two hours as it'll prevent stress incontinence later on in life.

    4. Take your breaks! You are entitled to them. Nursing is a 24 hour job. You should try to get all of your tasks accomplished on your shift but if you just didn't get to that dressing change because you were coding another patient then the next shift will have to do it.

    5. Wear comfortable shoes! Your feet will thank you at the end of a long day!

    6. Be nice to everyone. Including people that you cannot stand! You never know when you'll need help or whatever from them.

    These are just a few pieces of advice I can think of. I recommend that all new grads read "Your First Year as an RN" by Donna Wilk Cardillo, RN. It gives practical and timely advice on how to get through that tough first year as a nurse. Good luck to all newbie nurses out there!
  12. by   stevierae
    Never take anything too seriously--have fun at work. Lighten the he** up, and don't let any negative people infect you with their negativity. Try to go outside at lunchtime and get away from all the "shop talk" and gossip in the lounge. ALWAYS be a patient advocate. If you ever become an operating room nurse, and you object to the "No Code" status being removed when the patient is brought to the OR (as is often done, as surgeons and anesthesiologists don't want a death to occur on "their watch," in the OR--) speak up and make your feelings known!! If your supervisor dismisses your feelings, go to the ethics committee--you just MAY be instumental in effecting permanent change in policy and procedure. So many nurses don't want to be perceived as "troublemakers" and they don't want to make waves--but patient care will remain stagnant (as will our own abysmal working conditions) if RNs in the field don't advocate for both their patients and THEMSELVES.
  13. by   Sami*RN
    -Double check EVERYTHING you do.
    -When in doubt, check again.
    -Keep assessing your pts., things change constantly.
    -When obnoxious pts. stop complaining, something is VERY, VERY wrong!!
    -Be a patient advocate.
    -If they look like they're going to go down the tubes, they probably will.
    -A second IV can save you butt!!
    -NEVER, EVER, say "gee, it's kinda slow tonight!"
    -Just for sh*ts and grins, double check again!

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