What Is The Deal With All The Highly Educated & Professionals Becoming RNs? - page 20

So I pretty much always have nursing students with me. I have senior BSN students who are doing a critical care class (six 12 hours shifts), ADN students from 2 different programs doing their... Read More

  1. Visit  BostonFNP} profile page
    2
    I hate to admit it but I just thought of all of you.

    There was just an article on the local news website about the Georgetown report on the professions with the highest and lowest jobless rates. Nursing was one of the best at 4.8% new college grads, 2.3% experienced, and 1.7% graduate level. Starting salary new grad at 48k.

    Its a pretty interesting read, especially when comparing the numbers for some of the previous professions listed in this thread.

    Here is the link: http://www9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi...mes.2013.2.pdf
    Last edit by BostonFNP on Jun 27, '13
    PMFB-RN and Altra like this.
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  3. Visit  dishes} profile page
    0
    BostonFNP the Georgetown report doesn't give the sample size or a description of the study design, do know if an academic version of this publication is available?
  4. Visit  BostonFNP} profile page
    1
    Quote from dishes
    BostonFNP the Georgetown report doesn't give the sample size or a description of the study design, do know if an academic version of this publication is available?
    Other than the brief methodology section in the appendix, I am not sure about a more academic paper. I really just noticed it because it was highlighted in an article on the local news site and found it an entertaining read.
    dishes likes this.
  5. Visit  adc85} profile page
    1
    I'm a career changer, I start my program in August. I'm 27 years old and I have a BS in biology. After college I worked in an environmental lab for 4 years. I mostly ran the microbiology lab and also ran chemistry tests too. It was fun when I first started, but I burned out after 3 years of it. It was boring, the work was monotonous and easy, I wasn't challenged at all. I also commuted an hour to work and an hour home, and the commute really took a lot out of me. I have no desire to move closer and there aren't many opputunities in my field closer to home. It took me a year to decide that I want to go back to school for nursing. And I am no stranger to the medical field either. In high school, I worked part time in the radiology dept doing clerical work and hanging films for the Dr to read. I worked as a CNA for a year while I was in college, and then I worked in an ER as a ward clerk for 3 years. So I knew I would love nursing. I wanted a job Ina field that I enjoyed and something that would keep me busy. I don't enjoy sitting around with no work but still having to look busy! I wanted work that was stimulating and challenging, and something that would leave me feeling fulfilled when I went home. I also wanted better opportunities and the variety of positions and fields that nursing provides, as well as more of a work/life balance. Working 3 twelve hr shifts a week sounds more appealing than working 5 eight hr shifts a week plus 10 hours of commuting.
    mrnightinggale likes this.
  6. Visit  SENSUALBLISSINFL} profile page
    0
    Wow 250 comments on this topic as I write this. Yes, I had alot of classmates who were professionals in other areas, one was even a teacher for highschool.

    As alot of you posted, I suspect the economy is to blame here, the issue will be, as some of you nurses already working know, is that if you go into nursing but it is not your calling then they will burn out a lot sooner after investing time and money on this second career. Not to say that those of us who always wanted and had a passion for nursing will not burn out, but we will probably stick it out more and longer.

    And then of course this myth, my view of course, of a nursing shortage is so bogus as they are plenty of us novice nurses wanting a chance to work but cannot, they will find out that they will go for months looking for a position after getting in debt to pay for this education, and this is sad.

    I keep hoping everyday this will change.



  7. Visit  Swellz} profile page
    0
    As a second degree BSN, I was expected to go to college after high school, so I went. I didn't know what I wanted to do, and I certainly didn't know how to do the whole college thing and actually get an education. I don't regret my Anthropology degree; I learned a lot from my instructors and it did expand my mind in the stereotypical way that it is supposed to, but it was not useful unless I wanted to be a professor and write a book and do research all at the same time to pay the bills. Nursing was what I also wanted to do, thank goodness. Lots of the grad students who were in my medical anthropology classes were nurses, so maybe there is a PhD in my future... if I want to teach and be a nurse lol
  8. Visit  IEDave} profile page
    1
    Guess I'll throw in my 2 drachmas on this one as well...

    For me, while getting broadsided by the Great Recession was a contributing factor, my decision to go into nursing was not. A bit of background - back in '79, my dad passed away when I was 15. My mom was employed as a waitress/hostess/bartender/assistant manager & just wasn't bringing in enough to meet all the financial obligations, so she secured state funding to get cross-trained as an LVN. Did a spectacular job in school & joined the ranks in '81. Had job offers lined up before she'd passed her boards - ended up working FT in a hospital & per diem at a SNF. As for me - went to college, got an AA & a BS in Computer Science; my Bachelor's was conferred just about dead center of the S&L crisis in the 1980's, so it took me about 6 months to get a job as a computer operator.

    Fast forward to 2008 - I was my mom's primary caregiver when she passed away, which left me emotionally drained & battered. Lost my Sr. Programmer/Analyst job 7 months later, which gave me some time to think about what to do next. I considered the 2 primary options; one, go back to school & upgrade my skill set in computer technology, then return to a field where I literally started shaking before I left for work some mornings due to stress-related burnout; two, take a look at a job in healthcare, since at the time the healthcare industry was about the only segment of the US economy that hadn't completely pancaked. Option #1 ended up being more expensive, since I'd almost have to start from scratch and get a new CS degree due to the amount of change the field had gone through during my 23 years as an IT pro; Option #2 not only had the advantage of giving me more professional flexibility but also gave me a nice fallback position as a nurse informaticist, plus it put my flair for life sciences to much better use.

    Attended an ROP training class for pharmacy technicians, which ended up being a mistake - did well enough in the class, but none of the local pharmacies wanted to hire a 48 year old man fresh out of ROP training.

    Did some follow-up training as a CNA; had a job lead 2 days after the completion of my class & an actual job 6 weeks after the end of the class. Mind you, in my previous IT career I'd never had a job with less than 9 weeks of searching - typical was more like 12 weeks.

    Now - starting LVN class August 14th, with an estimated completion time of mid-December 2014.

    Will I burn out? Possibly, but I tend to think it less likely due to having learned a bit about setting boundaries, time management, stress management, etc. during the previous 25+ years. In any case, after having spent some time as a full-time LVN I'll re-evaluate & see if nursing still holds its appeal for me. If so, I'll proceed on to a BSN & ultimately an FNP, possibly in hospice. We'll see.

    ----- Dave
    Altra likes this.
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN} profile page
    2
    Quote from Swellz
    As a second degree BSN, I was expected to go to college after high school, so I went. I didn't know what I wanted to do, and I certainly didn't know how to do the whole college thing and actually get an education. I don't regret my Anthropology degree; I learned a lot from my instructors and it did expand my mind in the stereotypical way that it is supposed to, but it was not useful unless I wanted to be a professor and write a book and do research all at the same time to pay the bills. Nursing was what I also wanted to do, thank goodness. Lots of the grad students who were in my medical anthropology classes were nurses, so maybe there is a PhD in my future... if I want to teach and be a nurse lol
    *** Would have been a lot cheaper to expand your mind by spending a year or two traveling around the world with a back pack with very limited funds. Support yourself by working any odd job from cow milker to sailor to bartender or whatever. The limited funds force you to avoid hotels and stay in local homes. I highly recommend it as a mind opening experience.
    Fiona59 and Swellz like this.
  10. Visit  Swellz} profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Would have been a lot cheaper to expand your mind by spending a year or two traveling around the world with a back pack with very limited funds. Support yourself by working any odd job from cow milker to sailor to bartender or whatever. The limited funds force you to avoid hotels and stay in local homes. I highly recommend it as a mind opening experience.
    I entirely agree. I would have learned an entirely different set of skills that are far more applicable to being a person than lots of random stuff about random cultures around the world. But that's not what was acceptable. It wasn't even an option in my eyes at the time. I got trapped in the mindset of my area, and frankly, if that is the biggest mistake I make in my life, I am pretty okay with that lol.
    I would LOVE to travel more though.


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