What is the point of a uniform?

  1. I don't understand what the point is. Many nurses wear scrubs, whites, pants with polos, all colors, patterns, prints, animals, cartoon animals, many styles. Many nurses wear their personal jackets or sweat shirts over their tops. Why should we have to wear a uniform if some nurses even wear sweat pants???
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  2. 49 Comments

  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Are you talking about uniforms during nursing school or at your place of employment?

    We wore all white uniforms throughout nursing school. The dress code was very strict. We were easily identified among the staff which I think was part of the reasoning. Also, it instilled some values regarding professional dress. I still starch my lab coat!

    Now, in the real world of nursing, I still have a uniform. Blue or white scrubs or a combination of the two colors. The policy is a little more lax...I can wear the shoes I want, a sweatshirt of the same colors, or polos that have the hospital logo printed on them. I appreciated this coming out as a new grad...I can easily identify who is a nurse, an RT, dietary, etc. by the uniform/colors they wear. So can the patients.

    At another local hospital, you can wear whatever types of scrubs you want. It is hard to tell a nurse from a CNA or housekeeping. I don't agree with that policy.
  4. by   lashes
    Dunno bout everyone else, but I do not wear anything but scrubs to work because I do not want to be wearing bodily fluids and such on my "usual" clothing. However, doesn't a badge with RN written on it and a professional introduction including " Hi my name is x, and I am an RN" indicate what your position is, scrubs or not? Maybe management needs to talk to those who wear sweats and sweatshirts to work? It would be addressed here right away...
  5. by   canoehead
    Nope, no sweatpants here, yuck.
  6. by   fultzymom
    "Dunno bout everyone else, but I do not wear anything but scrubs to work because I do not want to be wearing bodily fluids and such on my "usual" clothing."

    Ditto here. I don't want the stuff on my clothes!! At our facility we are not allowed to wear anything but scrubs unless it is a special occasion. IE: when we play Michigan we can wear our Ohio State shirts and jeans if we like on that Friday and Saturday. Other than days like that, it is scrubs for all.
  7. by   nurse_nan
    Most employers have dress code policies to address what is to be worn. Your uniform reflects how you feel about your self, your profession, and your patients. Any clothing worn at work should be dedicated to work clothing only if you work in a patient care setting simply because of infection control issues. Do you really want to wear your jacket at work then look down at a social function and see that stain on the hem? And not know what it is or where you've dragged it across? And do you want people to see you as a dedicated professional wearing a clean, tidy, uniform even if it is scrubs or as a jogger who just stepped in to help out a little bit?
  8. by   SCRN1
    I only wear scrubs too for the same reason as someone else mentioned...I don't want body fluids on my regular clothes.

    We are going to a strict dress code April 1st. Respiratory (black) and housekeeping (burgandy) have already started theirs. Nurses will wear white or ceil blue and techs will wear navy. No t-shirts or sweatshirts are allowed. Shoes are to be made of leather and if clogs are worn, the strap must be worn across the back of the ankle. Only 1 pair of stud earrings...and only women may wear them. No embroidery unless it's the hospital logo. No visable tatoos. There's more piddly requirements but I won't bore you with them.

    Some staff have worn long sleeve t-shirts under their scrubs and I think most look neat and still professional looking. However, we have had some who've pushed it and come to work very sloppy looking and I think that's the reason they're now saying no t-shirts/sweats. For example, we have one tech who is very heavy and one day, she came to work with very baggy sweat pants. Then the next, she came in with sweats that were skin tight and barely made it past her knees. Not a good sight.
  9. by   morte
    Quote from SCRN1
    I only wear scrubs too for the same reason as someone else mentioned...I don't want body fluids on my regular clothes.

    We are going to a strict dress code April 1st. Respiratory (black) and housekeeping (burgandy) have already started theirs. Nurses will wear white or ceil blue and techs will wear navy. No t-shirts or sweatshirts are allowed. Shoes are to be made of leather and if clogs are worn, the strap must be worn across the back of the ankle. Only 1 pair of stud earrings...and only women may wear them. No embroidery unless it's the hospital logo. No visable tatoos. There's more piddly requirements but I won't bore you with them.

    Some staff have worn long sleeve t-shirts under their scrubs and I think most look neat and still professional looking. However, we have had some who've pushed it and come to work very sloppy looking and I think that's the reason they're now saying no t-shirts/sweats. For example, we have one tech who is very heavy and one day, she came to work with very baggy sweat pants. Then the next, she came in with sweats that were skin tight and barely made it past her knees. Not a good sight.
    i would guess you dont work at a university/public hospital?
    otherwise i would think the guys might have a case for discrimination...
  10. by   bunnybeaner
    He he. I think scrubs are sexy! :blushkiss
    Anyone else?? C'mon...

    And I do agree that from a practicality standpoint, you don't want to risk getting blood, urine, puke, you name it on your non-work clothes. It's not like I personally have a whole pile of cash to replace them with...
  11. by   SCRN1
    Quote from morte
    i would guess you dont work at a university/public hospital?
    otherwise i would think the guys might have a case for discrimination...
    I work at a big heart hospital, but it is a private one. I said the same thing about the guys and discrimination.
  12. by   scizzerin
    I wish we had a uniform! Everyone just wears scrubs, and whatever kind or coor. Housekeeping is the only difference; they wear burgundy. I'm a tech, and constantly get med questions or the pt just starts in on their issue (I'm still in school! Let me get your nurse for you....) I guess in a way, it's good, that my behavior/demeanor makes people think I'm a nurse. But... The guy who whipped his butt out of his gown to 'show the nurse the problem'.....ah, well......Let me get your nurse for you......
  13. by   cholli
    Everyone knows who the police officer and fireperson are- shouldn't nurses be as recognizable in their uniforms? We are professionals, let's look like it!
  14. by   tridil2000
    Quote from SCRN1
    I only wear scrubs too for the same reason as someone else mentioned...I don't want body fluids on my regular clothes.

    We are going to a strict dress code April 1st. Respiratory (black) and housekeeping (burgandy) have already started theirs. Nurses will wear white or ceil blue and techs will wear navy. No t-shirts or sweatshirts are allowed. Shoes are to be made of leather and if clogs are worn, the strap must be worn across the back of the ankle. Only 1 pair of stud earrings...and only women may wear them. No embroidery unless it's the hospital logo. No visable tatoos. There's more piddly requirements but I won't bore you with them.

    Some staff have worn long sleeve t-shirts under their scrubs and I think most look neat and still professional looking. However, we have had some who've pushed it and come to work very sloppy looking and I think that's the reason they're now saying no t-shirts/sweats. For example, we have one tech who is very heavy and one day, she came to work with very baggy sweat pants. Then the next, she came in with sweats that were skin tight and barely made it past her knees. Not a good sight.
    are the physicians also only allowed to wear 1 pair of earrings, and abide by all the rest of the rules?
    if not, then that is discrimination.

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