What Is the Problem With These Nurses? - page 8

I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're... Read More

  1. by   GardenDove
    Quote from reneemcsquared
    I still remember my first clinical as a student nurse. The charge LPN chastised me in front of the group because I didn't give her temperature, pulse, blood pressure and respirations in the "right" order. Years later, I was her nurse when she was incarcerated and I ran the jail medical unit. I said, you probably don't remember me but hey, :spin: What goes around, sometimes comes around.....
    OH!

    I'll never forget when the nursing instructor from Hell sent her adult daughter, who was on her way back from Alaska to California, by to see me in Washington State. Her daughter was getting a divorce, and for some reason this nursing instructor, who had driven me to tears the day after my mother's funeral, gave her my phone number.

    Ha ha, the daughter ended up spilling her guts about her abusive childhood that sounded like it was out of 'Mommie Dearest', turns out my hated nursing instructor was as twisted as I thought she was.
  2. by   Sheri257
    Quote from P_RN
    It is not eating our young. It's being MEAN.
    Yeah ... that's the bottom line. But, at the same time, we are not those RN's offspring.

    If anything ... we're management's offspring and their attempts to undercut RN staff salaries and benefits by making them train us. Let's face it: a new grad is a hellava lot cheaper than a veteran RN.

    As an older student, I know what's going on and I certainly understand the resentment.

    But, in this case, she didn't have to be a preceptor. She did have a choice. And, despite my mistakes and shortcomings it was, still, fairly cushy duty for her.

    She got her CE hours and I did most of the work. It wasn't a bad trade.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 6, '06
  3. by   twotrees2
    Quote from lizz
    I guess that's my complaint here. I can understand that when you're dealing with first semester students, just as an example ... it is a real hassle because the students don't know anything and the RN has to be with them all the time.

    But by the time we get to preceptorship, the RN doesn't have to be with us at all. We've been signed off on everything and, before we go to preceptorship, we have to get signed off on several tasks again ... just to make sure we can do it.

    There's very little we can't do as far as routine med surg floor tasks. The RN does not have to be with us unless it's something we literally have no experience with, which doesn't happen all that often with routine med surg tasks.

    So, it's really not that much of a hassle for us to be there except ... teaching us the quirks of that particular facility's system and equipment. My RN has never gone into any room to watch me do anything. You are, at that point doing most of the work because that's what you have to do to pass.

    But sometimes, I guess, it's just more fun to be mean than nice ... even when people are helping you out.

    :typing
    seems weird to me- either school is changed dramatically or our school was just that different - we took perhaps 2 - 3 patients depending on what area we were learning and took the most difficult -

    however - our instructor was breathing down our necks the whole time in and out frequently to check - we did not do anything without first approving it with the instructor or the nurse, our care plans were extensive and 12- 15 or more pages long and were NOT used by staff but for clinical only ( found mine a month or so ago - had to laugh at how we addressed everything compared to what we actually do in nursing lol) - ( though often nurses did review them and get ideas to use) - the nurses were great with questions usually but when not the instructor was there.

    it was clear to the facilities we were NOT there to do aide work but to learn nursing so we never got that trouble ( except psyc ward lol - as there wasn't much "clinical" or "medical" cares or treatments there on a whole so we would help with aide work just to do something besides sit watching the psyc patients troll around the unit. )

    matter of fact by the end 4th term clinical i was actually asking for more patients as i was interning and used to 7 patients and the activity associated with it - and even though our extensive care plans made life busy those i did mostly at home so i could get bored having 2 - 3 patients.

    maybe its cause we are a small area an a small college - i dont know. to bad students are made to take such heavy loads - how can they learn about things when given a full load - learning takes time to be able to ask questions , get help, be sure its right, just dont see the value of overburdening students to a point they are working loads like we are that have been in a long time- enough time once get out in the real world working to learn all about the overworked scenes - maybe that is why i have seen so many new grads run away cause if i hadn't learned the clinical skills in school ( and i wouldnt have if i hadn't had time to learn- hands on learner here ) id never have made it to where i am today. guess next time a new grad doesnt know how to change a wet to dry or do an accucheck ( honestly had these issues) i will be more understanding.............( not that i was harsh - but being short staffed i just did them instead of taking time to teach them the right way...... ) from now on any new grad we get will get a call to come watch and learn things if they have time - so when it comes up they wont have to feel anxious cause they dont know it.
  4. by   Rnurse4963
    They are naturally mean people who have no lives . They are rude, they have friends in high places and get away with alot of crap. The one I work with is an alcoholic. Brace yourself I've been a nurse since 1988 and if I had nickel for every nasty nurse Ive met I'd be really rich. What can you do ? Do you like your job? Just do the best you can do. Other people will notice what a good worker you are and defend you . If your job is not that great, poor pay? shop around. Eventually the boss who is employing the nasty nurse will get the hint when no one will work around her/him. You can complain about your co worker but chances are it will fall on deaf ears, and if you are the only one that is complaining it will seem like a personality problem . Ive bent over backwards to be nice to my nasty nurse, but to no avail. just recently I heard a new accusation she has started about me . You can only laugh at such humor, which also will get you thgough alot of good years of practice. Keep your chin up you've come this far.GOD BLESS YOU AND YOUR HANDS.
  5. by   melpn
    Quote from lizz
    I'm in California where we have ratios. Because of that, we never got more than five patients and, towards the end, I took all five so ... increased patient loads wasn't an excuse for my preceptor.

    :typing
    I understand, Lizz. But no matter how many pts. you have it is extra effort to train because you can't just do the job, you have to stop and explain what you are doing and why; it slows you down. This is an explanation of frustration, not an excuse! None of us were born nurses; we all had to go to school and be precepted by someone else. That's why I said it's no excuse and newbies should be treated kindly no matter what. I remember the resentful attitudes I encountered 10+ yrs. ago from my preceptors and I vowed I'd be the exact opposite. Teaching is unfortunately not something everyone does well or willingly and I am truly sorry you had a bad experience. Please don't let it sour you on nursing. Again, you learn just as much from the bad preceptors as from the good ones- the message you take away is that you know what you'll do better when you are the preceptor. As a result, you will be a great teacher when it is your turn even though it was a crappy way to learn that lesson. I wasn't trying to defend the nasty attitude you received- I hate it and when I see a newbie getting it I pull them aside and give them a bit of encouragement. No offense intended.
  6. by   Agnus
    Quote from sarahbellum
    It's not just hostile nurses in clinicals. I have 2 very hostile instructors. I can tolerate the perfection-make you whither with her stare type-when you have screwed up. These two instructors pick out the weak ones with no confidence and knock them down without picking them up later.

    Its just another symptom of the nursing shortage. My mom is also in nursing school and she says she is pretty sure they recruited for her instructors at the mental hospital.

    Are you unbalanced? Can't work as a hospital nurse? Then, try teaching and eat your young!
    OMGosh! One of my med surg instructors did come from a mental hospital And there were a few complaints when I was there that she was bullying students.
  7. by   patricelynne
    Hi Guys!---My experience in over 30 years has been that the more rarefied the specialty-nursing one is doing, the tougher they come. NICU, CCU, ER for example, vs. regular med-surg wards, general peds---you get the picture. Floating to general units it seems the nurses are so grateful for some help they act like human beings--generally; and I've worked all over the country. The new guy on the block in the more critical care areas is at their mercy. I think that's for a number of reasons. They'll accept you when you "proove" yourself, but they won't loose any sleep over who is going to teach you. If you don't adopt the attitude towards patients, i.e. in ER I ran into this frequently, you quickly become outcast. One ER in NY state I worked nights in was so prejudiced toward blacks, native American indians [sadly nearly always inebriated,] and anyone on Medicaid, that it was so toxic to me I began running 5 hr. long episodes of bigeminy and tri. That did it. Life's too short to spend it with people who don't value others. There ARE other jobs/places to nurse. I tried a number of kinds of nursing I never dreamed I'd have done to find something compatible with my soul. Believe me when I say that there are fantastic people to work with in our profession. That said, there are the same volume of great ones and stinkers in many other lines of work. One of my sisters, a special ed teacher burned out in the public school system in under a year. No one would tell her the diagnoses of her sp. ed students and she wasn't allowed to see their records! Schizophrenia, bipolar, FAS, etc. After she left they hired two teachers to take her place. Now she tutors one-to-one out of her home and her sanity If you are a spiritually-oriented person, read "The Secret" by R. Byrne. It'll change everything about your life for the better. You'll learn how to pray for "thine enemies" and how to keep your perspective. There's a DVD if reading isn't how you want to approach this. I've studied Florence Nightengale's life and she was up against this problem, too! Being English, dealing w/ Irish Catholic nuns who thought they kknew it all and didn't care for her approaches to patient care---and Flo trained at Kaiserswoth Hospital in Germany under the Deaconesses. not in Great Britain so THAT made her suspect to them. Shehad a number of volunteers who truely had no idea what they were in for in the Crimea. When all became clear, however, there was dissention among the ranks. She was a hell of an administrator and teacher; God love her. So, as I've said before, some things never change; guess that's human nature!
  8. by   RN BSN 2009
    Wow... just wow..
  9. by   twotrees2
    Quote from patricelynne
    Hi Guys!---My experience in over 30 years has been that the more rarefied the specialty-nursing one is doing, the tougher they come. NICU, CCU, ER for example, vs. regular med-surg wards, general peds---you get the picture. Floating to general units it seems the nurses are so grateful for some help they act like human beings--generally; and I've worked all over the country. The new guy on the block in the more critical care areas is at their mercy. I think that's for a number of reasons. They'll accept you when you "proove" yourself, but they won't loose any sleep over who is going to teach you. If you don't adopt the attitude towards patients, i.e. in ER I ran into this frequently, you quickly become outcast. One ER in NY state I worked nights in was so prejudiced toward blacks, native American indians [sadly nearly always inebriated,] and anyone on Medicaid, that it was so toxic to me I began running 5 hr. long episodes of bigeminy and tri. That did it. Life's too short to spend it with people who don't value others. There ARE other jobs/places to nurse. I tried a number of kinds of nursing I never dreamed I'd have done to find something compatible with my soul. Believe me when I say that there are fantastic people to work with in our profession. That said, there are the same volume of great ones and stinkers in many other lines of work. One of my sisters, a special ed teacher burned out in the public school system in under a year. No one would tell her the diagnoses of her sp. ed students and she wasn't allowed to see their records! Schizophrenia, bipolar, FAS, etc. After she left they hired two teachers to take her place. Now she tutors one-to-one out of her home and her sanity If you are a spiritually-oriented person, read "The Secret" by R. Byrne. It'll change everything about your life for the better. You'll learn how to pray for "thine enemies" and how to keep your perspective. There's a DVD if reading isn't how you want to approach this. I've studied Florence Nightengale's life and she was up against this problem, too! Being English, dealing w/ Irish Catholic nuns who thought they kknew it all and didn't care for her approaches to patient care---and Flo trained at Kaiserswoth Hospital in Germany under the Deaconesses. not in Great Britain so THAT made her suspect to them. Shehad a number of volunteers who truely had no idea what they were in for in the Crimea. When all became clear, however, there was dissention among the ranks. She was a hell of an administrator and teacher; God love her. So, as I've said before, some things never change; guess that's human nature!
    must be vary state by state or something - i have a special needs son adn was required to not only tell them his problems but sign releases to docs so they could get info when needed and correlate treatment with the docs - sad that they wouldnt tell her- doesnt seem fair to her or the child - cant treat right if you dont know what your treating.
  10. by   Sheri257
    Quote from melpn
    I understand, Lizz. But no matter how many pts. you have it is extra effort to train because you can't just do the job, you have to stop and explain what you are doing and why; it slows you down.
    But that's just it: she wasn't doing most of the job, I was. In order to pass preceptorship, I had to do 80 percent of the work for all five patients and, believe me ... I was.

    Normally, I would agree if I was a first semester student. But, I was a pretty functional fourth semester student. I was running all day and that's fine but ... don't tell me this was tough duty for my preceptor.

    When I was there my preceptor was reading magazines, watching soap operas in the nurses' lounge and chatting shopping with her friends all day. Why? Because I was, in fact, doing most of the work. She didn't have to watch me or do much of anything.

    Having to stop reading a magazine to give me occassional instruction wasn't that much of a hardship in this particular case.

    The only time she really got busy was when we were slammed with a bunch of admits and discharges but, that didn't happen very often.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 8, '06
  11. by   BrnEyedGirl
    It does sound as if this nurse might have a bit of an attitude problem,..you will find lazy workers everywhere! To her defense however,..if I'm precepting a student,.even a fourth semseter,..I have to sign off on everything,...assessments, drsg changes, I/O's, etc, everything except meds which the instructor is required to sign. This means I have to do my own assessment of the pt,.see the drsg change or at least look to see that it was done, if pain meds are given I must do my own reassessment of pain, I have to sing off on all orders and make sure they were done etc. So not only am I trying to teach, but often times I am repeating the same care the student is given,..if something is over looked, doesn't get done, isn't done correctly etc,.I am the one responsible,...I'm not saying that is an excuse for being rude or short tempered w/a student,..I enjoy precepting most of the time,...but there might be more going on than you are aware of while you're busy doing your tasks.
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RN-Cardiac
    This means I have to do my own assessment of the pt,.see the drsg change or at least look to see that it was done, if pain meds are given I must do my own reassessment of pain, I have to sing off on all orders and make sure they were done etc. So not only am I trying to teach, but often times I am repeating the same care the student is given
    Well ... she signed off on the paperwork but, she didn't do any assessments, check wound care or anything like that. Quite frankly, she doesn't even bother to bring a stethoscope to work. I guess she has acute hearing ability where she can listen to breath and heart sounds without it.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 8, '06
  13. by   BrnEyedGirl
    Quote from lizz
    Well ... she signed off on the paperwork but, she didn't do any assessments, check wound care or anything like that. Quite frankly, she doesn't even bother to bring a stethoscope to work. I guess she has acute hearing ability where she can listen to breath and heart sounds without it.

    :smackingf
    Hang in there Lizz,..it will get better!!!

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