What Is the Problem With These Nurses? - page 6

I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're... Read More

  1. by   sunnyjohn
    Lizz,

    Didn't you know you were 'spose to be perfect???

    You're supposed to know to smack that do-hicky just so on the top!

    You're 'sposed to know to jiggle the button on that particular IV pump!

    How could you forget a Fonzi style "AYE" when you hit the PYXIS machine???

    :icon_cheesygrin:
  2. by   GardenDove
    I sympathize with someone not into precepting though. I totally don't enjoy it, it disrupts my flow. I also don't like checking other people's charting. I'm too easygoing to be a good preceptor.
  3. by   smk1
    Quote from GardenDove
    I sympathize with someone not into precepting though. I totally don't enjoy it, it disrupts my flow. I also don't like checking other people's charting. I'm too easygoing to be a good preceptor.
    Garden Dove, I as a student can totally understand not wanting to precept or have a student tagging along all the time. I can see how it would slow you down and disrupt your flow of thinking and activities. Having said that, there is no excuse for nurses being testy with the students who are only doing what the nurse his/herself did years ago to get where they are. As students or new grads we need to try to be as self-sufficient as possible and be be considerate of the staff that has to help train us often for little to no extra money. In turn though, it would be nice to be treated with professionalism. Most nurses and staff that I have come in contact with so far are polite and professional, some are even friendly and eager to teach. Those few though...
  4. by   Sheri257
    If they don't want to precept ... don't do it. These nurses aren't forced to precept, it's voluntary. But my program gives them CE hours for it, which is why they do it.

    :typing
  5. by   Freedom42
    Another question from a student: How are preceptors chosen?

    It seems to me that a hospital that's truly interested in retaining good people would make only its very best nurses preceptors -- and of course offer a pay premium for doing it. That way students wouldn't find themselves working with someone who's been "saddled" with the job and resents it.

    Who becomes a preceptor, and what (if any, besides personal satisfaction) are the rewards?

    P.S. Once again, I find myself nodding at Ingelein's words. I think there's a lot to the notion that hospitals allow bullying and hostility to persist because employees who are divided are conquered. They're too distracted by their own problems to focus on demanding better working conditions.
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Freedom42
    Who becomes a preceptor, and what (if any, besides personal satisfaction) are the rewards?
    As I previously mentioned ... they get CE hours for it, at least in my program.

    And I'm perfectly willing to acknowledge that a lot of this could be my fault. I could just be rubbing her the wrong way and may have inadvertently done something that really ticked her off. Maybe this preceptor would have been happier and much better with a different student.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 1, '06
  7. by   Freedom42
    Thank you. I did note your earlier post regarding continuing ed credits. I was curious to see if other nurses might describe different scenarios.

    Frankly, it sounds as if there's no standard for becoming a preceptor in the situation that you describe.
  8. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Freedom42
    Frankly, it sounds as if there's no standard for becoming a preceptor in the situation that you describe.
    There really isn't. They're always short on preceptors so ... basically, it's anyone who wants to do it.

    :typing
  9. by   GardenDove
    I really disagree with theory that hospitals allow bullying in order to control their employees. I don't think every situation is the same, and there are some nurses that claim they are picked on when in fact their own work is deficient. It's not always easy for management to sort through complaints by employees, to see which ones are valid. It's similar to trying to referee your kids.

    We have one gal at my small hospital, she fits into the above catagory. We are a critical access rural hospital, so everyone knows everyone, and I've heard the story from many different points of view. She came as a new RN to OB. Yes, there are some strong characters in that dept, esp on days. She always complained about the gals over there being mean. She had a million write ups, and I heard from the OB gals that she just wasn't getting it, she was lazy, and had an attitide of 'woe is me'. I noticed, whenever she floated over to med-surg where I worked at the time that she never wanted to pitch in. They were having a difficult time staffing OB and the manager seemed to give her chance after chance.

    Finally, something happened where she missed a totally unreassuring monitor strip, and they almost lost a baby. The doc in question made a stink, was very upset, and she was ousted from OB permenantly. Management decided to give her a chance on Med-Surg, since she had never learned med-surg after nrsg school.

    I now work CCU and floated to med-surg last Friday. Remember, we are a very small hospital. I worked with her for 4 hours, she was finishing up an 8 hr evening shift and I was starting my 12 hour night shift. She pawned 3 admits within 2 hrs on me, and it turned out she only had 2 fairly easy pts. The other nurse had 4 difficult ones, one of whom was extremely disruptive and the one CNA was totally tied up with him. When she pressed me to take the 3d admit, one that she was due to take, I falsely assumed that she was overwhelmed with her pts. Well, the unit secretary ended up furious, and decided to write an email to our manager (she manages CCU and med-surg), after she tried to reason with this gal who spent the last hour of her shift on the internet. I said I would write one too. Nightshift got in on the act, since they found deficiencies in her charting (they do regularly), and the manager heard from all quarters, and responded very positively to my email, thanking me for going above and beyond for the pts and affirming that I wasn't the only one to give her feedback on that evening.

    I'm certain that this gal will claim that she is picked on and is a victim. But, her work ethic stinks and she is a lousy teamplayer. My point is that some people claim they are bullied when in fact the problem is with themselves.
  10. by   Elle.p.enn
    Quote from lizz



    What haven't I been doing and what are my shortcomings?

    :typing
    I can tell from this statement that, unfortunately, you have ended up with a less-than-satisfactory preceptor.

    It's part of the preceptor's job to provide you with feedback.

    I'm in a preceptorship now as well, and my preceptor is fantastic. She gives me feedback constantly, lets me know exactly what my shortcomings are, is consistent, and empowering.

    It benefits the preceptor to prepare you as well as she can, you can help her out if you work there later!

    Maybe you can confront her throughout the day, say "How do you think I'm doing so far today?" or "My goals are to give an accurate and complete report, how do you think I'm doing on this goal?" Keep it professional and in line with your clinical objectives.
  11. by   DolphinRN84
    Quote from lizz
    I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're pretty functional and helping out with most of the work, and some nurses still beat you down to a pulp, I just don't get it.

    What's the point of being so mean? I'm running my butt off all day, I'm giving all of the meds, doing all of the charting, aide work, etc. for most of the patients. Yet, no matter how hard I work, there's still a constant barrage of criticism ...

    Of course, I make mistakes and I definitely need to improve in a lot of areas. No question about it. Nevertheless, I am not a total novice and, despite my shortcomings, I do know I'm making their day a hellava lot easier.

    But ... I'm only human, and I do tend to make even more mistakes when I know I'm going to get slammed no matter what I do. After awhile, no matter how tough you are, it's difficult to concentrate and do everything the nurse wants when you know she's hostile and looking for any opportunity to jump on your case ... even when you do things right.

    I actually don't need nor do I expect praise or reassurance but, like a lot of people, I don't tend do well when I getting slammed all the time either.

    I can't wait to get out of there and let them get back to doing all the work. Thankfully, my days of slave labor will soon be over. I hope they got their jollies because if this is how they make themselves feel better or whatever it is ... good riddance.

    :typing
    Hope you are doing better lizz. I agree with the post that talked about nurses who have only been there for a year or 2 and act like they don't know what it's like to be student..let alone a new grad nurse! It makes me so mad.
    Last edit by DolphinRN84 on Dec 4, '06 : Reason: Ehhhh...changed my post entirely.
  12. by   tiroka03
    I also would put some blame on the college. I know that some students feel they know more than the nurses with whom they will be mentoring. Students are being applauded for their achievements, and they should be, but it may help to give an inservice on the dynamics of working on the floor, and sharing a nurses' assignment. As an LPN, when RN students are assigned to my patients, it is a set up for trouble. There will at least one student who has predecided they are more knowledgable and better qualified to be on the floor than the LPN. Yet, as the nurse on the floor who finds problem after problem the student is creating or missing, it gets old. I have standards with I adhere to with patient care and compassion and comfort of patients and family. Many, if not most of the students will strive for these same goals, but not every student. And it will be that one student who will squeak and squak about how stupid their nurse was. You know the one, you walk in and find her cleaning a wound with water she cleaned the patients bm. Who throws you a dirty look, when you point out that isnt correct procedure and it's that student then believes you as a nurse are stupid and rude.

    If you were to create an inservice pretaining to both students and nurses, what would the main points be.

    Students:
    1. these patients aren't yours, you are being allowed to learn with them, but they are really the staff nurses responsibility.

    Nurses:

    1. the students are wanting to learn and prove and improve their skills. Be careful not to squash their good intentions.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Elle.p.enn
    I can tell from this statement that, unfortunately, you have ended up with a less-than-satisfactory preceptor.

    It's part of the preceptor's job to provide you with feedback.

    I'm in a preceptorship now as well, and my preceptor is fantastic. She gives me feedback constantly, lets me know exactly what my shortcomings are, is consistent, and empowering.

    It benefits the preceptor to prepare you as well as she can, you can help her out if you work there later!
    Well ... I am doing better now because it's finally over ... thank god! And, believe me ... I will NOT be working there. As far as I'm concerned, she can do her own work from now on. The last day I was there ... she spent most of the day reading magazines and talking shopping with her friends.

    Some of her feedback wasn't that bad, it's just that she was really rude in the way she went about it. I've had other preceptors during externships and they'd tell me what they'd think all the time .... it's just that they didn't feel the need to be rude and disrespectful. There's a big difference.

    And a lot of times, she wasn't consistent at all. She'd tell me not to do something, then chew me out for following her instructions which, she conveniently forgot.

    Quite frankly, some of her instructions were completely screwed up. She'd always tell me to wait for the trays to come out before taking blood sugars which, sounds great in theory.

    But when a bunch of the five o'clock meds are due at the same time the trays are coming out, the whole run is nothing but diabetics, and some patient inevitably ends up having a problem like not being able to breathe and you've got to take care of that ... you're not going to get everybody's blood sugar and insulin done before they start eating.

    So, inevitably, one of those diabetics' sugar is going to skyrocket and then I'll get blamed for it.

    I asked her to let me do the glucose checks and insulin a little earlier ... which is what was actually listed on the MAR ... but, she wouldn't let me. Then, of course, it was my fault when one of the patient's blood sugars skyrocketed.

    I should have done a better job of prioritizing and checking that particular patient first however ... with the entire run being diabetic patients, I also did anticipate that this could happen and I did try to avoid it but, to no avail.

    Whatever ...

    It's done now.

    :hatparty:
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Dec 6, '06

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