What is the complaint with nursing salaries? - page 6

I don't know, maybe I've been broke too long, but I hear alot of complaints about how you'll never get rich in nursing and how bad the pay is. Well, I look at it this way; I know nurses start out at... Read More

  1. by   zenman
    Quote from Tweety
    and trudging through six feet of snow uphill both ways.....
    Nope, very little snow in Louisiana. Thank goodness for that otherwise the cardboard covering the holes in my shoes would not last as long. And it was only about a mile both ways. But I was in the ARMY three days after graduation from high school. They gave me all kinds of clothes, food and neat weapons that were much better than my old .22 cal!
  2. by   kadokin
    Quote from angel337
    it all depends on who you ask. when you get out of school and start working...you're going to say to yourself "oh, now i get it". yes, most nurses do make good money, but believe me you work veeeeeeeeeery hard for it. some harder than others. I think i make decent money, especially considering i used make $4.25-$10/hr through out my employment history before i became a nurse. the salaries for some nurses do not equate the responsibilty of the job, so this is why there are complaints. but considering how hard it is to get jobs now, even when you have a degree.......i am grateful for what i have.
    couldn't have said it better myself. It is way more $$ than I have ever earned before, but Boy do I earn it and then some! Although it's a very good living wage, it is nothing when you consider the responsibities commensurate to the job and the physical/emotional toll it sometimes takes on your life... Don't go into nursing for the money, it will never meet your expectations.
  3. by   Jessy_RN
    Quote from hipab4hands
    fromm where I sit and can see: Hospitals always seem to have PLENTY to splurge on gifts and "extras" for dr's at Christmas and throughout the year--- no end of money is spent on oppulent decor for the lobbies, hallways, and even patient rooms, and they seem to find some money to spend on other appointments that are showy and loud----yes, they seem to have plenty to spend on things that are not critical to patient care. Why not take care of another "asset"---your employees"? Answer: nurses are seen as LIABILITIES, not ASSETS. Simple as that.
    Exactly, I've been on 2 job interviews this week. One medical corporation made 1.2 Billion dollars in profit last year and the other smaller company made over 10 million dollars.
    Both companies told me that I should expect to be paid less, becuase I would work in an outpatient setting and won't have to work weekends. When I asked if their hospital based nurses, who don't work weekends, are paid less also, I was told by the interviewer "Of course not".
    When I tried to clarify with the interviewer what I was hearing, ie- my RN license and experience are valued less by the company ONLY because I would work in an outpatient setting--the interviewer refused to answer.
    Obviously, I don't want to work for any company, who are not only disrepectful of thier employees, but also doesn't see them as an asset.[/quote]



    Good for you! It's their loss.
  4. by   kadokin
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Few new grads have any complaint, I have found. I can't blame them. Going from making NO money to 50 or 60K or more is GREAT to most of us.

    I tell you what: The complaining starts when these same nurses advance their education (getting BSN, MSN or more) and gain invaluable skills, yet find they are NOT rewarded at all for their efforts with a compensatory and fair wage---let alone, respect.

    Or maybe it happens when they see how used up many nurses become after just a few years at the bedside. Let one ON THE JOB injury happen and see how quickly you are disposed of, with them fighting worker's comp (to which you would be ENTITLED) every miserable step of the way. Let the attitude that a new grad can easily replace you in a heartbeat get to you after a while---the ole "warm body" syndrome that pervades can burn out more than a few nurses......

    This is what leads to so much burnout and complaining.

    And on the vein of what Q is saying---- I am one who believes a new grad (or one with less than 5 years) is NOT worth the same as an experienced and better-educated nurse. But nursing has yet to recognize that.

    I so agree with Suzy (Q)---she is worth a lot more than the new grad with less education/experience. But many places, the minute you step away from the bedside and into management or teaching, you are not rewarded, but often, punished in a way, with poor wages and treatment. This is what so many complain about.
    WHERE does a nurse make 50-60k? I want to move there.
  5. by   Tweety
    Quote from kadokin
    WHERE does a nurse make 50-60k? I want to move there.

    Florida, believe it or not. I'm up to 58K so far, with very little overtime and working 36 hour weeks. Mind you what I took home was $18,000 less than that.
  6. by   Lisa CCU RN
    Quote from Tweety
    Florida, believe it or not. I'm up to 58K so far, with very little overtime and working 36 hour weeks. Mind you what I took home was $18,000 less than that.
    I thought I heard Florida was one of the worst pay states for nurses? Is this with experience? I have seen in some nursing magazines nurses in NY making $65,000 to start.
  7. by   Q.
    Quote from kadokin
    WHERE does a nurse make 50-60k? I want to move there.

    Wisconsin here. I make 72k a year, (salaried, so no overtime though I work more than 40hrs/week) but this income now FINALLY after 8 years experience and one thesis away from a master's degree.

    My old job as a staff development nurse I was making 38K. And that was just 4 months ago.
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Generally, where nurses make more, they also have a higher cost of living. Just be aware of that before you pack up your bags and house and move.

    www.salary.com

    there is an area there that calculates "real income" based on area. Good place to get a dose of reality for us!
  9. by   kadokin
    Quote from icurn_nc
    i'm a new grad, and i guess i'm still in that giddy stage of being able to pay rent and buy groceries and rent a movie- all from the same paycheck. i am able to live in a clean and safe area, and i'm able to send my son to the best school district in the state (which is also nationally ranked).

    but this is all coming from a girl who grew up really poor, so this is coming from my perspective.

    but i still think we are, as a group, underpaid and we top out way too fast. not exactly sure what to do about that. i've been looking into getting my bsn, now i'm not so sure- doesn't seem like the monetary payoff will be worth the investment (although the intellectual payoff would be). if anyone has done it let me know if it was worth it.

    s
    i got my bsn. it was my first nursing degree, so i don't have a basis for comparison as far as how much better it is "intellectually". i can, however, tell you this: i do not receive one penny extra for having a bsn vs adn/asn/diploma. i have been offered some opportunities that i was told i might not get if i didn't have the advanced degree. not opportunities for advancement or better pay, mind you, but work in non-traditional areas such as case management and psych. what about the rest of you? is it worth it to have a bsn? i'm glad i have it, but wonder if there are other places where it is seen as something of value by admin/colleagues. i have actually taken some flack because i have a bsn rather than adn from colleagues. anyone?
  10. by   kadokin
    Quote from Q.
    Wisconsin here. I make 72k a year, (salaried, so no overtime though I work more than 40hrs/week) but this income now FINALLY after 8 years experience and one thesis away from a master's degree.

    My old job as a staff development nurse I was making 38K. And that was just 4 months ago.
    What do you do? What's your speciality? Your position? And what is the cost of living where you are? Just curious. Congratulations on furthering your education. My hat is off to you
  11. by   kadokin
    Quote from Tweety
    Florida, believe it or not. I'm up to 58K so far, with very little overtime and working 36 hour weeks. Mind you what I took home was $18,000 less than that.
    Good for you Tweety! Do you have special certifications, etc. that add premium to your pay? Any benies w/that? Do you travel? What is the cost of living where you are? Yeah, that tax cut, the house always wins, don't they?
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    I thought I heard Florida was one of the worst pay states for nurses? Is this with experience? I have seen in some nursing magazines nurses in NY making $65,000 to start.

    Florida is pretty low comparatively speaking, but we're not as low as some other areas in the south and midwest.

    Yes, my pay is with experience, 15 years. 14 at the same hosital, getting good evaluations and good raises, along with some market adjustments. But new grads in higher paying states make as much as I do. So even though it's a nice income, a new grad in California or Connecticut wouldn't think so.
  13. by   grimmy
    Quote from crnasomeday25
    i thought i heard florida was one of the worst pay states for nurses? is this with experience? i have seen in some nursing magazines nurses in ny making $65,000 to start.
    [font="book antiqua"]considering how much it costs to live in nyc, 65k is not that much. a lot depends on how you want to live. if you want a house with a yard, you're not going to get it working in nyc on 65k. i grew up in nyc, and houses with a decent sized yard are over $1 million. if you don't mind living in a one-bedroom condo or apt, then you might be fine. we're not even figuring in the costs of commuting, safety, or a family.
    i don't think i make nearly enough considering the cost of living in my community. it is the one defining factor for rns interviewing in this area. police, nurses, and firefighters cannot afford to live in the immediate charlottesville area or albemarle county. i commute from a nearby county out of necessity.

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