What is better and why - Salary or hourly?

  1. I am in my last semester of nursing school (ADN program) and in a professional issues class. My assignment, which will be due in 2 months, is to participate in a debate - hourly vs. salary pay. I chose the hourly side but without experience in this career it is difficult for me to support my opinion. I would love to hear from experienced nurses out there. Can you tell me what you think is best and why? I would appreciate it greatly! Thanks.
    Last edit by Cairo662 on Jan 15, '07
    •  
  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   purple_rose_3
    Hourly because of all the extra shifts that you can pick up and get paid all that overtime. And hourly because of the days when you need to stay late and chart.
  4. by   CHATSDALE
    salary can mean that you can be worked for as many hours as they choose w/o overtime unless management is really where your interests lie take advise given per rose
  5. by   classicdame
    Hourly. Salary is based, usually, on a 40 hour week. But if you work more than 40 hours you are short-changed. If your job allows you to leave on time EVERY time then salary is ok.
  6. by   lyn261788
    hello,, i am lyn. do you know waht is the normal weight for children 1-5 years old and 6-9 years old??..hoping for your immediate reply thanks
  7. by   new_grad06
    HOURLY!!!!!
    Salary-leaves a chance for you to get jipped!!Unless you are allow to leave early which is highly unexpectable
  8. by   Christie RN2006
    Quote from purple_rose_3
    Hourly because of all the extra shifts that you can pick up and get paid all that overtime. And hourly because of the days when you need to stay late and chart.
    Exactly! Hourly is the only way to go. I can't tell you how many days I have had to stay over to chart or even to help out the next shift with an admit, procedure, etc.
  9. by   outcomesfirst
    I think it depends on the position. If you are staffing - hourly. If you are in another situation - research, teaching, disease management - I think salary is the way to go. Above and beyond that is culture - if you are salary in a bad culture you will be miserable and leave, if you are hourly in a bad culture, you might stick it out "for the money" but you will leave eventually.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from cairo662
    i am in my last semester of nursing school (adn program) and in a professional issues class. my assignment, which will be due in 2 months, is to participate in a debate - hourly vs. salary pay. i chose the hourly side but without experience in this career it is difficult for me to support my opinion. i would love to hear from experienced nurses out there. can you tell me what you think is best and why? i would appreciate it greatly! thanks.
    [font="comic sans ms"]financially, hourly is better.

    however, it is the salary that marks the professional.
  11. by   RN29414
    Hourly is better in my opinion. Not only because you can get overtime but, if you are in a state with a union you can participate. Salaried nurses are considered management and cannot negotiate with the union. I do not consider salary pay more professional. My husband works in a Yacht yard and is salary - didn't even graduate high school. If hourly is the only way nurses can get paid near what they deserve then that is the best choice.

    Mary
  12. by   teeituptom
    Quote from ruby vee
    [font="comic sans ms"]financially, hourly is better.

    however, it is the salary that marks the professional.
    professional what. that is an uncalled for statement and highly incorrect and inflammatory.:angryfire:angryfire:angryfire
  13. by   TheCommuter
    For staff nurses, hourly pay tends to be better. However, hourly pay and "wages" are also associated with the working-class, blue collar people of society.

    Salary pay, to some people, is more indicative of a professional employee. Salary indicates professional, white collar status in society. However, it is not a good idea to be a salaried employee if you're a bedside nurse. You'll lose plenty of money, because you will always work over your allotted 40 hours.
  14. by   Mrs. M.
    I love the flexibility of my salaried (exempt) position. Financially I would be better off if I was punching a time clock, but I like not having to worry about about coming and going at exact times, and if I need to leave a little early I don't have to use combo time. It's true that I almost always end up working more than 40 hours a week, but it's nice being responsible for my own time.

close