What is a Sugar Cleanse and Do I Need It? - page 4

The Dictionary defines cleanse this way: to rid of impurities; to remove toxins from the body. Body cleanses have been around for centuries. From the Egyptians to the Romans, people have always tried... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    Okay guys, please stick to the topic. Fine to disagree (as I said before), but please remain respectful and within the TOS. Thanks.
  2. by   Carol Ebert
  3. by   Quota
    Your biggest backlash comes from your vague talk of sugar cleanse and detox. None of those articles address that. I don't believe anyone disputed that too much sugar is bad and linked to negative health consequences. Explain your "cleanse" or your article still remains as fear mongering using buzz words that may make the general public scared but science literate people blow you off as a fear monger.

    It's also not a direct correlation between sugar and chronic disease, so many other factors are involved as the links you just provided do mention. Sugar in and of itself is not the sole cause of health issues in the vast majority of people.
  4. by   klone
    Nor do I believe it's been proven that nearly all chronic diseases are caused by "inflammation" as your article states. If that were the case, NSAIDs would be a panacea.
  5. by   hherrn
    These are great references showing some of the damage we do buy eating commercial high sugar foods. And, the link between diet and inflammation becomes more important as we learn more about the relationship of inflammation and disease.

    I don't think there is any question about how harmful our food choices are.

    But, when I looked for some reliable information about some of the premises of your OP, like retained toxins needing to be flushed, it was hard finding credible experts without a financial interest.

    I found that Dr Oz supports this approach.

    I did find some credible experts who also doubt the cleansing idea.

    Let's be clear," says Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, "there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn't." The respectable one, he says, is the medical treatment of people with life-threatening drug addictions. "The other is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you're supposed to have accumulated."

    " "Detox" is a case of a legitimate medical term being turned into a marketing strategy – all designed to treat a nonexistent condition."

    Is there any evidence that poor diet leaves toxins in your body that require interventions other than stop eating bad food.
    Can you define the "cleanse" you advocate in any way?
    Do have any good sources?
  6. by   Carol Ebert
    What a great discussion with varying viewpoints. It reminds me that we all have the ability to research this topic for ourselves and find the best way to deal with the toxic overload of sugar in our lives. Finding something that actually works for you should be the goal. And I agree there are alot of programs that don't measure up.
  7. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Carol Ebert
    What a great discussion with varying viewpoints. It reminds me that we all have the ability to research this topic for ourselves and find the best way to deal with the toxic overload of sugar in our lives. Finding something that actually works for you should be the goal. And I agree there are alot of programs that don't measure up.
    I really wish you would directly address the specific concerns people have verbalized regarding your article rather than continue to offer meaningless double-talk that only further reduces your credibility.

    Let me distill it down for you:
    1. What specific "toxins" are you speaking of?
    2. What "toxin residue" are you speaking of?
    3. What do you mean by "cleanse"?

    When you write an article the onus is on you to include the credible research that supports your premise not the reader.
  8. by   Bibee
    how does reduced total peripheral resistance cause high cardiac output?
  9. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from Bibee
    how does reduced total peripheral resistance cause high cardiac output?
    Unless this is directed at the OP, you might want to start your own thread to ask your question. You'll more likely get more views and answers on your own thread. Best of luck
  10. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from Wuzzie
    I really wish you would directly address the specific concerns people have verbalized regarding your article rather than continue to offer meaningless double-talk that only further reduces your credibility.

    Let me distill it down for you:
    1. What specific "toxins" are you speaking of?
    2. What "toxin residue" are you speaking of?
    3. What do you mean by "cleanse"?

    When you write an article the onus is on you to include the credible research that supports your premise not the reader.
    I could not agree more. I think it's pretty inconsiderate to post an article with vague references to a proposed solution, then refuse after numerous queries to elaborate/clarify, then put the onus on the reader to do the research required to figure it out or find credible rationales for the intervention. You've got some nerve, OP.
  11. by   WestCoastSunRN
    Carol,
    I appreciate your bringing up the topic of sugar as a toxic substance to our bodies. As evidenced by some of the literature cited throughout this thread and in other peer reviewed studies, the healthcare industry is starting to take a serious look at sugar consumption as a player in disease process.

    I think a break down in communication is occurring, though, in your use of the word "toxins". Are you referring to inflammatory mediators?

    Are you advocating for a certain kind of dietary supplement to be used to help restore blood glucose levels?

    By "cleanse" do you mean following what we already know are healthy habits, but many of us are too lazy to do consistently? (This is often me) Or is it something else? I have to agree with others that your article was unclear on this.

    I am not sure what to make of "pharmaceutical grade micro-nutrients".... do you mean vitamins?

    I will also say that I do think it is a shame modern healthcare has become too much a pill-for-every-ill industry. Sadly even the "natural" healthcare industry is now following this trend (which could be by your article is getting some pushback -- if that is what you are advocating).
    I am hopeful, though, that we (scientists and healthcare providers) are realizing the past foolishness of eschewing the prescription of basic healthful practices to ourselves and our patients. While a healthy lifestyle is no guarantee against all disease/illness, we know for sure it is needed to combat obesity, diabetes and coronary artery disease, for instance.

    Toxicity is a thing, for sure. It occurs for lots of different reasons and it can refer to various processes. Defining terms in an article such as this one is important to avoid confusion.
  12. by   macawake
    Quote from NotAllWhoWandeRN
    If this is research-based, please provide your operational definition for "toxin," what the parameters of your sugar cleanse are, and what each "toxin" level was before and after the sugar cleanse.
    +1000

    This sums up the questions I have.

    OP, I think it's necessary that you describe/define exactly what the toxins you mention are. You also need to explain what you mean by "sugar cleanse". If it's some sort of treatment/intervention, you need to describe it in detail. And of course you also need to show how the levels of "toxins" (that need to be named outright, not referred to in vague terms) in the human body were measured pre and post intervention and their actual numerical values. How else can you with any credibility claim that the "sugar cleanse" actually works? Were there any weaknesses in this so far unreferenced study/studies? Come to think of it; what was the study design? Were there any confounding factors? Etc. etc. etc.

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    What a great discussion with varying viewpoints. It reminds me that we all have the ability to research this topic for ourselves and find the best way to deal with the toxic overload of sugar in our lives.
    I'm sorry, but this doesn't really feel like a discussion. I see an OP making several claims and I see many requests from many posters for clarification regarding these claims. Can you please clarify?

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    And today we live in a toxic soup from exposures to toxic cleaning products, toxic fabrics that touch our bodies all day long and even at night, toxic mattresses, toxic air, toxic "new car smells" (yes that is called off-gassing from chemicals used). And then there are all the toxins on food we eat, whether fresh or packaged.
    A sugar cleanse fixes all this? How? Through which mechanism of action?

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    But what does that have to do with doing a sugar cleanse?
    That's what I'm asking myself. I'm still very confused regarding that, even after reading your OP twice.

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    Did you know that sugar is toxic to the body?
    So is water. (It's a matter of dose).

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    And therefore sets us up for "inflammation" which is now the root cause of nearly all chronic disease.
    Why is inflammation in quotation marks? Do you have peer-reviewed studies that show that inflammation is the cause of almost all (what's nearly all? 80%? 90%? 99.6%?) chronic disease?

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    Why can't you stop eating sugar easily? Because it is 8 times more addicting than cocaine. It actually "hits" the brain at the same location as drugs which causes the release of "feel good" hormones and of course the addiction cycle continues.
    How does one measure exactly how addicting cocaine is? How has it been determined that sugar is exactly 8 times more addicting than cocaine (as opposed to 7 times or 9 times?)? Has this been studied somehow?

    We're healthcare professionals. "Feel good" hormones? What are they? We're talking neurochemicals here, right? Dopamine? Endorphins? GABA? Oxytocin? Serotonin? Endocannabinoids?? I'm sorry if I come off as pesky, but I feel like I'm being talked to like a five-year-old with zero medical knowledge when you write "feel good" hormones instead of specifying which ones you mean. Almost everything in the post is in my opinion quite vague. To me that gives the impression of woo, rather than science.

    Quote from Carol Ebert
    So if sugar is an issue for you, why not give a sugar cleanse a try. Of course, beware of any sugar cleanse that is loaded with sugar! So read the labels and make an informed choice, and then go for it.
    Okay. Sugar isn't really an issue for me, but if it were and I wanted to do something about it and wanted to take your advice, what am I to make of this? You seem to be referring to some sort of product? It seems I'm supposed to read the label on something? Are sugar cleanses something you drink? Eat? Or is it one of those weird (sometimes dangerous) alternative things that's supposed to be administered via an alternative bodily orifice? (ahem...)


    It's late in the evening over here in viking land. Time for a shower and a good night's sleep on my toxic mattress

  13. by   brownbook
    Any how.....I think you need to define sugar! Sugar is the generic term for soluble carbohydrates. Simple sugars, monosaccharides, including glucose also known as dextrose, fructose, and galactose. Table sugar or granulated sugar is sucrose a disaccharide which is a disaccharide of glucose and fructose.

    Complex carbohydrates are made up of sugar molecules that are strung together in long complex chains. Complex carbohydrates are found in peas, beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Both simple and complex carbohydrates are turned to glucose (blood sugar) in the body.

    And OMG I am already confused...I just copied that from Wiki. And anyhow vegetables have sugar. Should I stop eating my vegies, to say nothing of fresh fruit???????

    I'm going back to my diet soda and Snickers diet!

close