What is a Sugar Cleanse and Do I Need It? - page 2

The Dictionary defines cleanse this way: to rid of impurities; to remove toxins from the body. Body cleanses have been around for centuries. From the Egyptians to the Romans, people have always tried... Read More

  1. by   traumaRUs
    Quote from hppygr8ful
    These are not peer reviewed evidence based research. Plus could you please use APA format when citing your references.

    Hppy
    Sorry but I haven't used APA format since school. I don't even think I could...lol
  2. by   traumaRUs
    Here are some (hopefully as I've been out of school for awhile now and APA was never a strongpoint) new references:

    Johnson RK, Appel LJ, Brands M, et al. Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2009;120:1011-20.

    From Clinical Nutrition: Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
  3. by   Quota
    No one is denying that the average American eats too much sugar and there are negative health consequences link to it. This article is garbage though talking about cleanses and detoxing, saying sugar is a toxin without any specifics. Anyone with a decent science education should know that dose is directly related to toxicity and just about everything is toxic at a high enough dose. Throwing the word toxin around to a supposedly science based audience is just stupid. Pretty much anyone talking about cleanses and detoxes is trying to sell you some scam product. No place for that garbage here.
  4. by   traumaRUs
    Ok. I have removed some off topic posts. Fine to disagree but if you haven’t even read the article commenting is rather worthless except to increase your post count
  5. by   hherrn
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Ok. I have removed some off topic posts. Fine to disagree but if you haven’t even read the article commenting is rather worthless except to increase your post count
    I read the article. And, I really don't care about my post count.

    I have also read books by Michael Pollen and Michael Moss. The subject interests me.

    Salt Sugar Fat by Moss does a great job explaining many of the points made about the food industry, and how we ended up where we are now, and Pollans books are well researched and well written,

    The points the author makes about the food industry and the addictive nature of sugar are well founded.

    I think it is great to educate people about the connections between sugar and ilness. And, to provide some of the commercial incentives that have made modern food what it is.

    It is the claims she made regarding the "cleanse" I object to If there is validity to them, she really should show it. Lasting toxins and damage to the gut that will be repaired by pharmaceutical grade micro-nutrients? This sounds like pseudoscience.

    If this is not a gimmick, but has some scientific background, she should include it.
  6. by   OneRN2
    I just happen to come across this post; let me say that I do "agree" with the overwhelming opinion of hysteria regarding sugar "toxins".
    Although, I also wish to state that "I" found the article the writer referred to "interesting" for the following reasons.

    1-It was found in "JAMA" or the Journal of the American Medical Association. This is a "peer-reviewed" medical journal, it publishes original research, reviews, and editorials.

    JAMA Internal Medicine*is an international peer-reviewed journal, seeks to provides information that may lead to positive change in our health and patient care delivery. Thus this process ideally subjects an author’s "scholarly work, research or ideas" to the scrutiny of other experts in the same field. The article the writer referred to can be (copy & paste) found at... JAMA.*2012;307(12):1273-1283. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.339 ( Journal of the American College of Cardiology Volume 57, issue 16, April 19, 2011- Pages 1690-1696)

    2-*In addition, one of the American Heart Association recommendations for the general population is aim to improve "blood glucose" or sugar intake while eating a healthy or my words a "healthier diet" .

    The AHA "7" cardiovascular health recommendations or "metrics": not smoking; being physically active; having normal blood pressure, blood glucose and total cholesterol levels, and weight; and eating a healthy diet) you may read yourself just access the link or copy and paste... Elsevier: Article Locator and read this article.

    Articles may also be found at Google scholar with the full doi.org links above

    I "do not fear any sugar toxins", or "radical diets". I do believe each one of us here can contribute to our Nursing Scientific knowledgebase; and maybe mini-self research or self assessment or topics that interest us or our patients.

    I also admit that I enjoy the opportunity to annually make and keep a few of my New Years resolutions...to be a bit more cognizant of my Life and health choices, habits, and take note of what best benefits me in this gift called Life.

    Thanks all!
    Last edit by OneRN2 on Dec 18, '17 : Reason: Wanted to also give title and pages
  7. by   hherrn
    Quote from OneRN2
    I just happen to come across this post; let me say that I do "agree" with the overwhelming opinion of hysteria regarding sugar "toxins".
    Although, I also wish to state that "I" found the article the writer referred to "interesting" for the following reasons.

    1-It was found in "JAMA" or the Journal of the American Medical Association. This is a "peer-reviewed" medical journal, it publishes original research, reviews, and editorials.

    JAMA Internal Medicine*is an international peer-reviewed journal, seeks to provides information that may lead to positive change in our health and patient care delivery. Thus this process ideally subjects an author’s "scholarly work, research or ideas" to the scrutiny of other experts in the same field. The article the writer referred to can be (copy & paste) found at... JAMA.*2012;307(12):1273-1283. doi:10.1001/jama.2012.339 ( Journal of the American College of Cardiology Volume 57, issue 16, April 19, 2011- Pages 1690-1696)

    2-*In addition, one of the American Heart Association recommendations for the general population is aim to improve "blood glucose" or sugar intake while eating a healthy or my words a "healthier diet" .

    The AHA "7" cardiovascular health recommendations or "metrics": not smoking; being physically active; having normal blood pressure, blood glucose and total cholesterol levels, and weight; and eating a healthy diet) you may read yourself just access the link or copy and paste... Elsevier: Article Locator and read this article.

    Articles may also be found at Google scholar with the full doi.org links above

    I "do not fear any sugar toxins", or "radical diets". I do believe each one of us here can contribute to our Nursing Scientific knowledgebase; and maybe mini-self research or self assessment or topics that interest us or our patients.

    I also admit that I enjoy the opportunity to annually make and keep a few of my New Years resolutions...to be a bit more cognizant of my Life and health choices, habits, and take note of what best benefits me in this gift called Life.

    Thanks all!
    These are great references showing some of the damage we do buy eating commercial high sugar foods. And, the link between diet and inflammation becomes more important as we learn more about the relationship of inflammation and disease.

    I don't think there is any question about how harmful our food choices are.

    But, when I looked for some reliable information about some of the premises of the OP, like retained toxins needing to be flushed, it was hard finding credible experts without a financial interest.

    I found that Dr Oz supports this approach.

    I did find some credible experts who also doubt the cleansing idea.

    Let’s be clear,” says Edzard Ernst, emeritus professor of complementary medicine at Exeter University, “there are two types of detox: one is respectable and the other isn’t.” The respectable one, he says, is the medical treatment of people with life-threatening drug addictions. “The other is the word being hijacked by entrepreneurs, quacks and charlatans to sell a bogus treatment that allegedly detoxifies your body of toxins you’re supposed to have accumulated.”

    " “Detox” is a case of a legitimate medical term being turned into a marketing strategy – all designed to treat a nonexistent condition."
  8. by   klone
    Quote from OneRN2
    I just happen to come across this post; let me say that I do "agree" with the overwhelming opinion of hysteria regarding sugar "toxins".
    Although, I also wish to state that "I" found the article the writer referred to "interesting" for the following reasons.
    All the random and unnecessary "quotes" in your post detracts from an otherwise well thought out post. You should try to avoid doing that if you want your posts to be given more credibility.
  9. by   NurseBlaq
    Refined sugar is bad but natural sugar is necessary, like everything else, in moderation. Lemon juice is also a good "toxin" cleanser, aside from the fact the body does it's own cleaning. However, sometimes the body needs help or is unable to rid itself of all things bad.

    The article was interesting but there's good and bad in everything. Just my $0.02.
  10. by   Accolay
    Oh... I thought a sugar cleanse was when you try to get all those nasty vitamins out of your system by eating a lot of candy...
  11. by   Farawyn
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Sorry but I haven't used APA format since school. I don't even think I could...lol
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Here are some (hopefully as I've been out of school for awhile now and APA was never a strongpoint) new references:

    Johnson RK, Appel LJ, Brands M, et al. Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2009;120:1011-20.

    From Clinical Nutrition: Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    You did it!!!
  12. by   Julius Seizure
    I am literally reading this while eating a bowl of homemade chocolate chip cookie dough.
  13. by   Julius Seizure
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Here are some (hopefully as I've been out of school for awhile now and APA was never a strongpoint) new references:

    Johnson RK, Appel LJ, Brands M, et al. Dietary sugars intake and cardiovascular health: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2009;120:1011-20.

    From Clinical Nutrition: Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in children and adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Quote from Farawyn
    You did it!!!
    You did it-ish! :P

    That's not current APA format but as long as it tells me where to find the source, it works for me

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