What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 57

What has other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as a LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   Peds4LifeRN
    Quote from Tweety
    A nurse crushed Percocets, mixed with water, and gave it through a central line IV.
    that is effing insane.
  2. by   Peds4LifeRN
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I worked night shift in pediatrics for over 10 years. We were always short staffed and the physical plant was huge so you ran miles all night. I worked with an older (60's) nurse who had come back to work after 35 years at home.

    Her "technique" for keeping her assignment quiet was to tape their mouths shut! I'm not kidding, I'd find infants and toddlers with pink tape over their mouths, often keeping a pacifier in place. Yes, I talked to her/reported it to the management staff, etc. She was warned. She didn't do it anymore but always held it against me..."gee, what's your problem? It works!"...sigh.
    so wrong!!
  3. by   MattiesMama
    During my psych clinical, as our CI was giving us a tour of the facility, a man who was in his wheelchair in arm restraints wheeled himself up to our group and asked if any of us had a knife. One of my classmates, trying to be helpful I guess, said "no, I have scissors though" and proceeded to take his bandage scissors out of his pocket and hand them to the patient. Luckily my CI intervened and plucked them out of his hands before he could do any damage.

    This same guy was my partner during one of our first clinicals...we were giving AM care to a male patient who was a new admit and a bit embarrassed at the whole process, so my classmate assured him "it's ok dude, we have the same equipment, and Mattiesmama has seen her way around her share of penises!" :smackingf

    (He graduated last week-god help us all!)

    This one is more sad...at another clinical, more recently, I took a patients O2 sat and it was in the low 80's...alarmed, I notified the charge nurse who said she would take care of it. About 20 minutes later I went to check on him and he was unconscious, barely breathing, and starting to turn blue. His O2 was on at 10 L/minute and he had COPD. Thinking she had made a mistake I turned it back down to 2L (which were his orders) and sent someone to get the charge nurse again while I tried to arouse him, and did a quick assessment on him-his initial RR was 8/min and his O2 sat was 66 but they started to climb as soon as I lowered the O2...The nurse came in and proceeded to ream me out for changing the oxygen flow, paying no attention to the patient who was having retractions and struggling for each breath right in front of her. I tried telling her that he had serious crackles in both lungs (you could literally feel all the junk that was in there, it was vibrating...awful) but she ignored me, put him back on 10 L, and walked away. I was at a loss-so I just ran to my CI and told her what was going on-and she proceeded to open a can of whopa$$ on the charge nurse and within like 2 seconds a code was called and he was transfered to the ER (which was ACROSS THE STREET, mind you, not a difficult transfer by any stretch) He was promptly diagnosed with pneumonia (duh) and died a couple days later. I was a basket case after that one-I've had patients die on me before but I still feel, to this day, that his death could have been prevented.
  4. by   nursing1980
    It is for reasons such as these that many nurses will make sure their loved ones are not left alone during hospitalization. I also believe there are many unreported errors of omission that result from staffing that is grossly inadequate relative to the patient acuity. My sister is alive today because I remained with her.
  5. by   VivaLasViejas
    Where I work (or did, until they decided to cut back on most nurses' hours), there was an LPN who used cranberry juice right out of the machine in the dining room to irrigate a Foley. For one thing, it wasn't really "juice" but cranberry cocktail, which of course has sugar in it (just what the poor guy needed, a better growth medium for the bacteria in his bladder) and is COOOOOOOLD!! Can you imagine having 60 ml of that stuff pushed into your inner workings?

    I only heard about this after the fact, but I cringe every time I think of it. (((((shudder)))))
  6. by   Medic2RN
    Quote from VivaLasViejas
    Where I work (or did, until they decided to cut back on most nurses' hours), there was an LPN who used cranberry juice right out of the machine in the dining room to irrigate a Foley. For one thing, it wasn't really "juice" but cranberry cocktail, which of course has sugar in it (just what the poor guy needed, a better growth medium for the bacteria in his bladder) and is COOOOOOOLD!! Can you imagine having 60 ml of that stuff pushed into your inner workings?

    I only heard about this after the fact, but I cringe every time I think of it. (((((shudder)))))
    HOLY CROW!!!!! Was that LPN thinking at all??!!
  7. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from HeatherLPN
    When I worked at the group home I was passing meds and heard a newer staff screaming for me from the bathroom. I go in and she's like "there's blood! She's bleeding and I don't know why!". Turns out she thought women with MR/DD didn't have periods
    This must go along with the widespread belief that these adults can't reproduce as well...

    I used to work at a company that employs adults who have MR/DD and from what I could gather, all of the women were given Depo to prevent them from having periods. One girls family waged a battle in court to get her a hysterectomy but they lost that one.

    Sorry, a bit off topic but it reminded me of it.
  8. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from samilpn
    Working agency in LTC facility,,,the RN i charge got caught.....licking duragesic patches that were on peoples body!!!! I know many of you have prob heard this done before but I was so grossed out!!!! now most places I go, they have to be felt, identified to make sure they are intact....ewwwwwwww
    At a LTC facility in my town, a CNA was going behind the nurses and removing duragesic patches that had been on residents and holding them in her mouth. Eeeeeek! That is a hardcore drug seeker!

    FYI: She was caught by another CNA and when she was turned in, the DON was upset with the CNA who reported it NOT the one stealing patches!
  9. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from LPN2RNdude
    OMG!!! when i worked as an LPN for a LTC facility we had a lady who would do that. she would wear white every day, and call everyone "my patients". she would even tell families she was an RN when she was really a CNA. she did some scary stuff, like post-op patients on subacute would ask for pain meds, and instead of telling the nurse she would give them tylenol out of her purse. i still cant believe management would put up with that liability. ive not been back to that place since graduating RN school,,,, but i hear she still works there.
    Wow, it definitely sounds as if she is suffering for a severe mental illness.
  10. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from greene
    When I was in nursing school, we were learning about foley catheters. One of the students asked the instructor, " If there is no lubricant, may I spit on the foley?". Totally freaked us all out.
    That is one person I would not want to care for me.....
    That sounds like some of the geniuses I've encountered.

    First day of CNA class, the instructor was talking about clinicals. Telling us where and when, etc. One genius raises her hand and asks "While we're out at these facilities, is there any chance we would be exposed to anything contagious?" The instructor was speechless for a few seconds and then said "YES! There are all kinds of contagious bugs in any facility". Then the girl has to further display her stupidity and say "I mean, is there any chance we could catch something? Like maybe the flu or a cold or something?" HELLO.
  11. by   CrazierThanYou
    Quote from Emmanuel Goldstein
    Not long ago in my neck of the woods, a rookie rescue squad EMT shocked a coworker as a joke. She died.

    http://www.bookofjoe.com/2006/01/behindthemedspe_7.html
    We had that happen in my area, too, several years ago.
  12. by   gentlegiver
    [quote=TheCommuter;1863108]It greatly helps to place one's self in the shoes of the CNA, especially a LTC CNA. I work at a nursing home, and each one of my CNAs is assigned 12 to 15 patients each. They simply do not have the time to sit with one patient for an extended period of time when there are other call lights that need to be answered in an expedient manner.

    In addition, most LTC facilities suffer from high employee turnover and attrition rates, so the DON usually won't bestow severe punishments upon lazy staff members. The DON is just happy that a warm body has arrived to fill the necessary shift. In addition, there's typically not enough quality time for most LTC nurses and aides to devote to non-emergencies such as panic attacks and screaming. Few, if any, procedures are done by the book in LTC. You'll learn as you spend more time in your new LVN role.[/quote

    In LTC CNA's have a very hard job, they are underpaid and overworked (IMO), however, to be sitting down reading a newspaper with bells going off is unacceptable. I have seen many lazy CNA's who would do anything to avoid taking care of any patient. But, I have never seen a Nurse who would give medicine to a CNA and not even go check on the patient. A panic attack is an emergency to the person in the thralls of one. And screaming is just a real loud call for help. Maybe where you work(ed) procedures are not followed, but where I work they are. Reports given to the DON are followed up on no matter how high the turnover is. A warm body is no comfort to a patient who is ringing for help, they need an active body who will attend them. No LPN in LTC should learn to accept poor work from thier CNA's. I am very lucky, I have CNA's who work hard and don't ignore any calls. Maybe it's because I expect it from them and always thank them for doing thier job before they leave each morning.
  13. by   gentlegiver
    Quote from StNeotser
    Day shift nurse gives report saying she doesn't understand why newly inserted foley isn't draining. I said I'd take a look. Foley did not drain because it was inserted into rectum.
    ROFL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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