What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 33

What has other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as a LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   JeepgirlRN
    How about this... A pt has a low blood sugar and a RN goes to get some D50.. Only instead of grabbing D50 she unlocks the narcotics cabinet, gets out an amp of morphine (for PCA), signs out the morphine and gives it to the patient... A whole 50 mg of morphine pushed for a low blood sugar.
  2. by   twotrees2
    Quote from hyperstudent

    I cannnot remember who wrote it (she must be a genius), but, I too, would rather work with a nurse who is willing to ask questions than with a nurse who thinks she knows it all.

    .
    i think several folks said that an i wholehertedly agree - id rather be asked ,or ask, then work with someone who wont ask or wont answer. a good team will help each other and that makes everythings oo much smoother.
  3. by   ElvishDNP
    Quote from JeepgirlRN
    How about this... A pt has a low blood sugar and a RN goes to get some D50.. Only instead of grabbing D50 she unlocks the narcotics cabinet, gets out an amp of morphine (for PCA), signs out the morphine and gives it to the patient... A whole 50 mg of morphine pushed for a low blood sugar.

    YIKES!!
  4. by   teletechboy
    How about having your stupid RN co-workers blurt out "Dirty Vagina" over and over in Tagalog and think it's funny at the workplace. These Golden Girl jaded nurses need to check themselves.
  5. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Ok I will confess I made a big mistake some years back, that would freak many of you out.

    Had a post partum patient who kept complaining of severe back and pelvic pain. So, I had medicated her w/percosets and motrin, all I could and applied heat to the sites. Felt her fundus, it was firm and midline.

    Still after an hour, the complaints of pain got MUCH worse. She was in tears. I could not figure out what her deal was, routine vaginal delivery, no complications, very little bleeding, vital signs fine. All she had sustained that could cause pain was a 2nd degree laceration to her perineum.

    Well, I called the doc for a pain med order; the patient got 10mg Morphine IM. Still very little relief. I was stumped.

    FINALLY it hit me. It had been HOURS since her foley cath was d/c'd. She had not voided yet postpartum. And she had had lots of IV fluids while in labor. Could it be her bladder was full? Mind you, I could not palpate the bladder and her fundus WAS midline, not deviated to one side or the other. Still.....

    I decided to straight-cath her anyhow. I am ashamed to tell you, I got out no less than 2000 ml (YES 2000!!!!) urine on that cath. Now HOW BAD do you think I felt????

    Goes to show even a 'seasoned" nurse like me can't be too careful. Because of that, the poor patient suffered needlessly and could have wound up hemorrhaging (full bladder gets in the way of the uterus shrinking down and keeping bleeding at bay).

    lesson learned. I freaked myself out that day with my own stupidity. Fortunately, no permanent harm was done to the patient.

    I remember as I was cath'ing her, her saying "ahhh I feel sooooooo good now". She was positively blissful and even hugged me afterward. I BET she felt good...her bladder had to be the size of a watermelon. Not to mention, having all those narc's on board, she had to be feeling "groovy". I just never could figure out why I could not palpate her bladder ----nor why her uterus did not deviate and rise appreciably. Where was all that urine HIDING??!
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Nov 15, '06
  6. by   transducen
    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    I'm a CNA in LTC. I would NEVER EVER put my hands on a medication, especially a narcotic. It is out of a CNA's scope of practice. What nurse would put herself at risk like that? Sheesh. And obviously, in this situation, they DID have the time to sit with the resident for 10 minutes, since the CNA was chilling at the station with the newspaper.

    As far as things that freak me out, I'm sure most of you have seen this, but I work with a nurse who, for the past 30 years, has recapped needles with her teeth. I shudder.
    Ohhhhhhhh Noooooo!!!!!!! CAPPING WITH HER TEETH??????????
  7. by   transducen
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I worked night shift in pediatrics for over 10 years. We were always short staffed and the physical plant was huge so you ran miles all night. I worked with an older (60's) nurse who had come back to work after 35 years at home.

    Her "technique" for keeping her assignment quiet was to tape their mouths shut! I'm not kidding, I'd find infants and toddlers with pink tape over their mouths, often keeping a pacifier in place. Yes, I talked to her/reported it to the management staff, etc. She was warned. She didn't do it anymore but always held it against me..."gee, what's your problem? It works!"...sigh.

    Sounds like she doesn't need to work night shift!!! OMG!!!
  8. by   nursebearfeet
    this one was one of the deciding factors to my move to the er. i was charge one night on a med-surg/ stepdown floor. an "experienced" rn had drawn a pt/inr on a pt with a heparin drip. the lab came back critical high. i went to investigate. to make a long involved story short the dumb a** was drawing the blood from the iv that the heparin was infusing thru!!
    she was fired shortly there after for giving a shot with an 18 g blunt tipped needle.
  9. by   transducen
    I don't know if this is the same thing but, there is a CNA here who wears white when she is told not to, and when the patient's family, and nursing students doing clinicals, not realizing who she is, tells her important information or asks questions she shouldn't answer, she doesn't pass it to the right people or say "I'm not a nurse." She just shakes her head in the affirmitive, says something she thinks a nurse would say, and keeps going.
  10. by   TazziRN
    Quote from nursebearfeet
    she was fired shortly there after for giving a shot with an 18 g blunt tipped needle.


    yeouch!!!
  11. by   nursebearfeet
    here's another one for ya,
    i received a pt from neuro icu to the stepdown unit with blood infusing............piggy backed on d5ns, wait it gets better with zosyn piggy backed on the d5ns
    some times i wonder, well you know the rest.

    same unit i recieved report from the 7a nurse that a 32 y/o s/p mva with a closed head injury, trached had resps of 35-45 all freakin day. when i asked what she' d done about that she replied "well, i talked to the trauma attending. he did'nt want to do any thing" wrong answer!!!!!!! i had him put on a vent and sent to ct. 2, count them 2 large pe's. some times you just cant try hard enough to kill someone. ( i guess)
  12. by   transducen
    Quote from hkoslo
    Below is the reason why over 98,000 people still die from med errors every year!

    Unfortunately my A+P prof. told us checking bp that way, is a good "trick". OOPS!
  13. by   Mulan
    Quote from JeepgirlRN
    How about this... A pt has a low blood sugar and a RN goes to get some D50.. Only instead of grabbing D50 she unlocks the narcotics cabinet, gets out an amp of morphine (for PCA), signs out the morphine and gives it to the patient... A whole 50 mg of morphine pushed for a low blood sugar.

    So what's the rest of the story?

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