What have other nurses done that have freaked you out? - page 16

What has other peers done intentional/unintentional to freak you out? Good or bad. Happy or sad. On my FIRST day as a LVN, (LTC) a res was screaming in her room as I was walking out to leave. I... Read More

  1. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from zudy
    This happened over 20 years ago, and it still creeps me out....
    I was working in an acute neuro unit at the time. I had been off for a few days, and when I got back I had a pt that was new to me, but she was was 3 days post op from a craniotomy for a bening tumor. She was doing very well, in fact the only reason she was still in acute care was because there were no empty step down beds. a very nice, spry 78 yr old lady.
    After introducing myself to her and talking a little bit, I told her I needed to do neuro checks on her. SHe got a real cute grin on her face, and told me to go ahead.
    When I checked her pupils, her right eye was reactive, but her left was fixed and dilated. I kept calm, she kept smiling and talking while I cooly(I thought) checked the chart for her previous pupil checks. ALL WERE PEARLA! I checked again, trying to act like nothing was wrong, and the pt kept grinning at me, but that left eye just looked, well, a little odd!
    I finally said,"Have yoiu ever had any problems with that left eye?"
    She said,"Now, honey why would you ask me something like that?"
    I started to explain pupils reacting to light,etc, and she laughed out loud!She said,"I have had a glass eye for 25 years, And not one person has noticed before you!" She was right, she had had 5 nurses in acute neuro before me, they had all charted PEARLA in her neuro checks. I also read all the progress notes, the neurosurgeon hadn't caught it, either!:uhoh21:

    Great job! You sound like a great nurse. If I'm ever in a neuro unit, I hope you're on it!
  2. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from ArizonaMark
    I was still a CNA at the time.
    I entered a pt. room with my nurse of 30 some years exp. The pt only spoke Spanish, so I was there to translate.
    The nurse was to re-start an IV line as the other was not patent. All began well enough, but about 2-3 min. into the arm with an 18 gauge, the nurse still can't hit the vein.
    About now the pt begins tearing up in pain. She is starting to squirm a little. The nurse says, "Stop moving!". Another minute or so go by, 30 year nurse finally sees that the pt is actually in quite a bit of pain from the fishing around. The nurse tells her, " Quit crying you big baby".
    At this point I am holding the woman's hand trying to comfort her to little effect. She is squeezing my hand so hard. Her eyes are almost pleading to me to get this person to stop hurting her.
    I began to get dizzy from the whole scene and had to exit stage left. 30 year nurse never got the IV start. Pt surely went home believing nurses are the Devil's handmaidens !
    Mark
    How awful for the pt! When I was 17 I had my first of two kids. He had several VSDs and ended up with open heart surgery. I was so young and did not know that I could stand up to a nurse. She tried over 8 times:angryfire :angryfire to get his IV during a CHF hospital stay. It was horrible. I then let loose. I will never allow someone to stick more than 2 times now.

    Also, I do not want anyone to flame me for having a child so early, ect. He is the best thing that has happened to me.
  3. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Cursing each other out is average behavior at my hospital. I had a nurse beat up a doctor, literally..she pushed his head against the door, then, slammed his hand in the door. Now, she got promoted to case manager.
    I can't fathom that. If I were the doc, I'd have pressed charges. It just goes with my saying that nurses are...

    And texas_lvn, lots of people had babies early. Maybe not the most ideal situation, but God made those kids for a reason!
  4. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    I can't fathom that. If I were the doc, I'd have pressed charges. It just goes with my saying that nurses are...

    And texas_lvn, lots of people had babies early. Maybe not the most ideal situation, but God made those kids for a reason!
    Yeah, you would be surprised at how unaccepting people still are today. I love this site and would hate to be asked to leave *I would be unrelenting to anyone who demeaned him in any way* because that is a sore spot. I NEVER EVER EVER want my child thinking he was a "mistake" ect. He reads behind me sometimes and I would hate for him to read anything neg about him. You dont mess with a momma bear
    Thanks for the support!
  5. by   lovingtheunloved
    Quote from texas_lvn
    Yeah, you would be surprised at how unaccepting people still are today. I love this site and would hate to be asked to leave *I would be unrelenting to anyone who demeaned him in any way* because that is a sore spot. I NEVER EVER EVER want my child thinking he was a "mistake" ect. He reads behind me sometimes and I would hate for him to read anything neg about him. You dont mess with a momma bear
    Thanks for the support!
    I knew a lady once who had serious issues about getting pregnant if you weren't married. You were a horrible person if you did. Yet she had no problem with premarital sex, just pregnancy out of wedlock, (and as, ahem, experienced as she was, she got lucky). Most teens don't plan to get pregnant when they're in the backseat. It was okay to be in the backseat though. I never got that.
  6. by   Danianne
    I am a CNA and heres one for ya.... I have seen this at not one but two LTC facilities. NIGHT shift that does "Change rounds" but don't change gloves OR wash hands between each resident... example 55 residents that need a change at 0500 and one pair of gloves to do it all.....
  7. by   rach_nc_03
    just caught up on the thread and remembered a good one...i might have posted it before, though....

    I was working as a CNA in a neuro ICU. We had a patient with a frontal lobe injury from being thrown off a horse. He spoke no english, but he communicated his feelings quite well with his hands- he had what I learned were typical frontal lobe injury-related behaviours, and continually pantomimed masturbating (even in restraints) whenever a female passed his room. If you had to get anywhere near him, he grabbed your boobs and held on for dear life. he was a strong little dude, and was constantly working his way out of the restraints- he had the order because he kept trying to pull out his ventricular drain. I spent a LOT of time with him, as he wasn't a 1:1 and the charge seemed to always assign him to a nurse with a very critical 2nd patient.

    One morning, I came in to get his vitals and empty his foley. The night nurse was a traveler who was known for being lazy- both on our unit, and at another hospital where she'd worked as a new grad. I always checked to make sure lines and dressings were still intact when I did my rounds, as the nurses often ended up stuck in another patient's room for long periods (I never touched the lines, of course, and only resecured dressings that I was able to touch within my scope of practice).

    On this particular morning, I looked at the tegaderm covering his ventric- ms. lazy had stuck 3 additional tegaderms on top of a ventric that was ALL THE WAY OUT. He had CSF leaking onto his pillow. (This was right at change of shift, and the day shift nurse was still assessing her other patient.)

    I hit the call button and yanked one of the residents, who happened to be walking by the room, in to help. At shift change that evening, the charge nurse confronted this nurse, who had initialed the tegaderm and charted that the line was intact at 0653. Ms. Lazy responded with, 'oops. i didn't notice- my bad.':angryfire

    But- as a tangent- the REALLY interesting thing happened later that afternoon....

    I walked by the room and saw this patient- still in wrist restraints- STANDING BY HIS BED. he'd flipped himself over, so his arms were completely rotated inward behind him. He was pulling and bucking like a dog on a chain. Ventric was all the way out, laying in the floor. I yelled for help, and another resident and I got him into bed quickly- the attending came running, and announced that they had to drill another hole in this poor dude's head.....NOW.

    I was lying across the patient on one side of the bed, holding his opposite arm and leg down- he was going for his central line by this point. Ten docs and nurses run in and place the sterile field over me, as there was no time to restrain him any other way.

    As they were positioning the drill, the patient got his hand around my waist and stuck it RIGHT DOWN THE BACK OF MY PANTS. :stone He proceeded to full-on grope my rear end- but I couldn't move, and nobody could reach to remove his hand- plus, we couldn't exactly break the sterile field at that point.

    So, for ten minutes, I had to stand there while he basically felt me up. Once the surgeon realized what was happening, he asked if I was okay- I said I was- and the surgeon started giggling a little. The other four nurses restraining the guy (he was strong) got to giggling, too. Once the new ventric was in, I yanked his hand out of my pants, moved back- and totally cracked up. I mean, I understood it was his injury making him act that way, so it's not like I could've been angry at him. Everyone in the room was laughing out loud by then, and the surgeon said, 'well, rach, looks like you have a new boyfriend.'

    The rest of his stay in the ICU, this patient was referred to as 'rach's boyfriend' amongst the staff. I visited him a few days after he transferred out to the floor, and he was as nice and polite as could be. I still laugh when I remember that day.
  8. by   Silverdragon102
    I remember once a about 10 years ago we had a bad flu outbreak leaving the hospital very short staffed and a call went out for nurses still registered but not working to help out. One retired nurse offered to help out and was assigned a ward and had to give one of the patients insulin sliding scale and when she went to get it checked with another RN she had drawn 20 units up as 2 units "didn't seem a lot to give"
  9. by   goats'r'us
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    Yes, slipping medications into a nurse's food is low down. I have seen that done before as well where I worked as a psych tech about 15 years ago. At that facility, we were certified to give medications, and there was another tech that used to sneak into the employee's lunchroom and eat our food (even if it was labeled with your name). Anyway, someone got sick of her stealing their food, and someone slipped some sort of liquid psychtropic medication in a soda bottle. The woman had a great deal of nerve stealing food, so, she sort of got what she got, but I would have NEVER done that.
    i have the more innocent version of this story, just to demonstrate that you don't have to be totally evil to teach people a lesson.

    a good friend of mine at uni had a big problem in his kitchen (shared between 10 residents. someone would go to the fridge (shared by 5 residents), open his bottles of coke and take a swig out of them. he tried labelling them, he tried putting them in a different part of the fridge, he tried complaining loudly to me in the busy kitchen that it was happening, but whoever it was kept doing it, so he smeared lignicane jelly all around the top of the bottles.

    stopped the theivery in it's tracks.
  10. by   adrienurse
    You people are raising my blood pressure.

    Okay, well there was the aide who wanted to wash everyone in the morning using the same pail of water (she had an old icecream pail that she had found under the sink). Word was she had once been an RN.

    then there was the nurse who came in to work with me and forgot her reading glasses who ignored my requests to go home and get them and kept holding pills up to me and asking me what they were.....
  11. by   fetch33
    First, I'll start with something I did as a new nurse. I had to give a young patient an enema because he was having an organ transplant the next day. I prepared my equipment and inserted the tube. Couldn't get the solution in. Kept repositioning the tube... still wouldn't flow. Finally, I removed the tube and noticed that I had left the cap on the tube :imbar Thank goodness it didn't get 'lost' in the patient's rectum.
    I have been a nurse for 20 years and have seen a lot of mistakes. One that sticks out in my mind is a patient that I took over from a new nurse. He had a triple-lumen sublavian catheter. In report, the nurse told me she had discontinued his IV fluids as ordered. When I did my assessment on the patient, I checked his TLC site. I was shocked to find a small amount of blood and an open hub where she had apparently 'discontinued' his IV tubing and left the line completely open to air! Thank goodness it clotted off.
  12. by   katfishLPN
    :smackingf i was working part time in ltc and this day i happened to be the med nurse. i went up to the floor at the beginning of my shift and listened to report. the day and evening charge nurses were both new nurses and i had been a nurse about 10 years at the time. i heard that one of the patients was unresponsive with a bs of 39. as med nurse i had to go back downstairs to count with the other nurse and bring up the med cart. so, as i was downstairs i got a call from one of the charge nurses upstairs that i had just listened to in report. she told me to bring up diabeta (a tab for po admin. by the way not to mention not what you would give for a low bs), she said she just called the md about so & so with the bs 39 and being unresponsive and she said the md's nurse asked what we had in our e-kit and our charge nurse told her diabeta and the md's nurse said to go ahead and give that then:trout:!!???? anyway i brought up glucogon instead and told them to get the order changed stat!!!!!!!! i tell ya scares me to death!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from katfishlpn
    :smackingf i was working part time in ltc and this day i happened to be the med nurse. i went up to the floor at the beginning of my shift and listened to report. the day and evening charge nurses were both new nurses and i had been a nurse about 10 years at the time. i heard that one of the patients was unresponsive with a bs of 39. as med nurse i had to go back downstairs to count with the other nurse and bring up the med cart. so, as i was downstairs i got a call from one of the charge nurses upstairs that i had just listened to in report. she told me to bring up diabeta (a tab for po admin. by the way not to mention not what you would give for a low bs), she said she just called the md about so & so with the bs 39 and being unresponsive and she said the md's nurse asked what we had in our e-kit and our charge nurse told her diabeta and the md's nurse said to go ahead and give that then:trout:!!???? anyway i brought up glucogon instead and told them to get the order changed stat!!!!!!!! i tell ya scares me to death!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    i work in a diabetic clinic, and i insisted that they order glucagon to have in their medication cabinet. while we have not had an incident that required the use of it, i was appauled that after just graduating from college, and hearing so much about having glucagon on hand, that there would be absolutely none stored in our diabetes center of excellence!!! thank goodness we did, because i got to see how it has to be reconsituted before administering it, and would have hated to have learned at the last minute while a patient is in crisis...

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