What does it mean to be a professional nurse?

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    I am just looking to get everyones opinion on what it means to them to be a professional nurse....I keep hearing one answer over and over from nurses I have met just looking for soe honestly, lol
    Thanks in advance
  2. 8 Comments so far...

  3. 4
    To appear professional: I wear clean unwrinkled scrubs that do not have cartoon characters on them. I keep my hair back and off my shoulders. I keep my nails short and unpainted, wear only one pair of earrings, and my tat doesn't show. .
    To work professional: I am accountable for my actions, follow orders promptly but have no hesitation to ask questions if an order doesn't seem right. I keep my patient's needs at the forefront of my mind. I answer their questions if needed and if I don't know the answer I find out. I document everything. I stay in the scope of nursing practice. I help my coworkers if needed.
    To act professional: I don't swear at work and I don't waste time. I am polite and nice to everyone.
    To be professional: A combination of all the above.
    facetiousgoddess, antidote, MzMouse, and 1 other like this.
  4. 0
    My state's NPA (nurse practice act) considers RNs to be professional nurses, and LVNs to be vocational nurses. I'm an LVN, so please don't flame me!
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    Some consider the BSN to be a "professional" nurse, while an ADN is supposedly a "technical" nurse.

    Personally, as an ADN I consider myself to be every bit as much of a professional as any nurse. At my workplace, I am a department head with a support staff, a budget, and many responsibilities; however, my assessment skills are still vital to the performance of my job, and I keep current in my clinical practice with continuing education and constant reading. If that isn't 'professional'........will someone kindly explain what is?
  6. 0
    Quote from MIA-RN
    To appear professional: I wear clean unwrinkled scrubs that do not have cartoon characters on them. I keep my hair back and off my shoulders. I keep my nails short and unpainted, wear only one pair of earrings, and my tat doesn't show. .
    To work professional: I am accountable for my actions, follow orders promptly but have no hesitation to ask questions if an order doesn't seem right. I keep my patient's needs at the forefront of my mind. I answer their questions if needed and if I don't know the answer I find out. I document everything. I stay in the scope of nursing practice. I help my coworkers if needed.
    To act professional: I don't swear at work and I don't waste time. I am polite and nice to everyone.
    To be professional: A combination of all the above.
    Ditto. I agree with all that was said.

    The cartoon characters... well, I'm a male nurse so I don't wear many bunnies or what have you. But I know a lot of female nurses that can work wonders with a pattern scrub top and a lab coat with the bottoms - which looks very professional and not like a walking clown.
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    I believe that to be a professional nurse you have to look and act like a professional (which isn't always easy!), demonstrate accountability and responsibility for your practice, as well as updating your knowledge regularly through education and sharing this knowledge with others.

    Some posters have mentioned scrubs with cartoons on them. Now i don't wear them, i wear a patterned hat but as my hospital does not have a paediatric department i don't see the point in dressing like a clown. Some nurses do and yes it does look a bit silly. However, I don't believe it's a problem when you work in paeds, especially paeds theatre. If it looks unprofessional but makes children feel more at ease, well the emotional wellbeing of the child should come first.
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    I think that there is professional with a lower case p and Professional with a capital P.
    Lower case it definitely applies to how one dresses and conducts themselves.
    In my state Professional (upper case) refers to a nurse AD, BSN, MSN. As the amount of education increases so does the autonomy with which that nurse practices. Some nurses consider only the BSN and above as professional nurses. It is difficult to differentiate on education alone as both AD and BSN nurses take the same licensing exam. After the BSN degree the difference becomes a little clearer as the amount of education and advanced practice nursing certifications increases.
    All that being said....I was an LPN (LVN) for 25 years prior to returning to school. I would go along with the technical nurse title, BUT, I still considered my job a profession!!!
    Nurses at all levels are important members of the patient care team! Getting hung up on titles does not benefit our patients in any way.
    mjlrn97 - I agree that you have the skills to allow you to function in a position of a leader/manager...I would definitely consider you a professional!
  9. 0
    Quote from meme75
    I am just looking to get everyones opinion on what it means to them to be a professional nurse....I keep hearing one answer over and over from nurses I have met just looking for soe honestly, lol
    Thanks in advance
    this type of question will always elicit a varied response, for it depends on what type of professionalism you are referring to.

    are you talking about academic professionalism, i.e., the degree one holds?
    if so, it 'seems' the bsn is the new version of the professional nurse.
    it is the perceived ideal.

    if you're alluding to behavioral professionalism, i.e., how one carries oneself- then again, it is all about individual perception.
    being a team player, not getting dragged into cat fights, not responding to gossip, conducting oneself with grace, not having to prove oneself or getting the last word in, treating others with the same respect you'd expect for yourself...all of these are important in conducting yourself 'professionally'.
    and it has nothing to do w/one's credentials.

    and so, there is not a correct answer to your question.

    but i would take someone who conducts themself professionally, over a degree-held professional, anyday.

    leslie
  10. 0
    Thanksto everyone that replied, I got a very rounded response and that is exactly what I was looking for, thank you all again..


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