What Do You Want To Hear When Receiving Report? - page 4

When signing off duty and giving report about my assignment to oncoming staff, I usually advise of what I did for the patient during my shift (ie...Meds, dressing's, any treatments or pre-op prep),... Read More

  1. by   rebelwaclause
    High-Five Zoe, Thanks for the OR tip (No MORE long a$$ reports!)
  2. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by rebelwaclause
    Rats Sleepyeyes...I thought this was a great idea too. We tried it, and failed miserably. I'm off at 0730, new staff starts at 0715 (if they are on time...Ooooo...LATE STAFF...ANOTHER THREAD!). There was times up until 0800 that we would have to ask those who have already heard report to come relieve us. I guess their thoughts where they waited until all staff members had arrived before listening, then EVERYONE heard report on everybody, so all would be informed. I loved the tape recorded report, but unfortunately too much overtime was being given, so managers dismissed it.
    no wonder it didn't work; the implementation was a lil screwy to say the least!


    the whole point of having a few tape recorders was so that after report, the prior shift is immediately relieved upon getting report, and there's not that gawd-awful one-hour wait for the patients to get some pain relief or whatever--the whole point of doing it this way is, there's always a nurse covering that assignment.
  3. by   BBFRN
    We are required to do chart checks every shift to cut down on info that might be missed in report from the previous shift. This helps a lot, because there are people who consistently leave stuff out. Things move so fast on our floor that kardexes aren't even used any more because it's so much trouble to keep updating them.
  4. by   mattsmom81
    I am one who probably gives too much info to those less anal than myself. . hehe.

    I like to do a head to toe systems review of abnormals then labs, IV's and POC for next shift. If the oncoming nurse knows the patient we don't get into ancient history. I've learned to physically review chart orders during report to avoid missing something.

    I am bad about leaving 'little notes' for my docs too...taped securely to the chart so they don't accidentally fall off. .

    I prefer too much info to not enough when I recieve report so I try to do the same in ICU...but on the PCU it becomes report on major points...or we're way OT...sometimes I had trouble switching gears between ICU and PCU when I floated.
  5. by   Scavenger'sWife
    GREAT thread...very informative.

    BadBird: Your list was great. I give report pretty much the same way. I add: Mobility, Diet and tolerance, withe Skin, add edema and treatments for decubs, Labs: abnorms and tx for them, PAIN: meds for it, last dose given, effectiveness, etc., Family: if there is any necess info such as wife gives AM care, etc.

    I work days, 12 hr shifts. We recently have been concentrating on slimming report time. We've tried various things and are doing pretty well so far. We divided up the floor into three groups representing rooms (1st group is approx the first 10 rooms and so on. Of course it can vary somewhat with census.) The on-coming nurses sit in that group's report area and it's the off-going RN who moves to the areas as needed to give report. RN's MUST give report (not LPN or NA) and the LPN and NA who is going off-shift covers the floor. On-coming LPNs and NA must hear report along w the RN. That way some delegation can begin immediately. Report begins promptly at 0645 and we really strive to end at 0715. Not too bad.

    I agree w you guys that a pet peeve is the nurse who goes on & on & on about the size, shape, odor & color of each BM, yadda, yadda, yadda......PUH-LEEZE. Just tell me if they pooped or not & MOVE ON. I am becoming notorious for saying "OK...gotcha...I only have 12 hrs, so let's move on!"

    I am orienting another RN, so I have written down the list like BadBird's, and gave it to her to use for report to try to keep her on-track. She would be one of "those nurses" if I allowed it. I listen in to her report and I am always saying (with a dramatic look at my watch!) "OK! What else??" (I am SUCH a "B"!!!)

    Like I said ...great thread.
  6. by   rebelwaclause
    Originally posted by regnursein99
    RN's MUST give report (not LPN or NA) and the LPN and NA who is going off-shift covers the floor. On-coming LPNs and NA must hear report along w the RN. That way some delegation can begin immediately. Report begins promptly at 0645 and we really strive to end at 0715. Not too bad.
    Man...That is interesting! Do your LP/VN's have assignments or are they delegated tasks to complete throughout the shift from the RN? Why does the RN give the report and not a LV/PN?

    Interesting.....!
  7. by   mario_ragucci
    I'm a cna on a med-surg floor for 7 months, and am in school to be an RN in Spring 2004. I like the way they do report on my floor. At the beginning of shift, the charge RN writes the assignments on the board and indicates transplants and isolations. We all see each other and know who we're working with. During that 15 minutes I top off my fresh, on-board glucose levels for the next 5-6 hours by eating a meal. Thats really the key for a successful shift. I'm not DM either.
    During the next 15 minutes I can talk to the departing RN's and gain additional PT info, neseccary for PT care.
    I wouldn't go for any staff who tried to personally attack me during my arrival, glucose intake, shift orientation, clipboard preparation or actual PT debriefing.
  8. by   mattcastens
    Originally posted by NancyRN
    Where I work, all the nurses have the bad habit of actually reading the trifold to the oncoming nurse! It takes an hour to get/give report. I've tried to break this trend, but it seems to be deeply embedded. If I don't READ the trifold to my replacement, she'll start hammering me with questions such as: what were his Vitals? What's the date on his Heplock?"until I have to pick it up and read everything to her.
    I used to have that problem until I said, "you're an intellegent nurse -- read it yourself." I also broke the habit by simply not using the flowsheet to give report -- I do it all off the top of my head. If I'm not reading, they're not reading. Of course, it takes some practice, but working flight and EMS got my brain working.
  9. by   joyflnoyz
    I like to hear the simple, non consequential items, such as

    "Contact isolation D/T MRSA/blood"

    hmmm new pt, off going nurse forgot THAT little tidbit today....
  10. by   neuroRN
    I like to know what occured on the shift I am taking over for, abnormal labs or vitals, PRN's given, etc. I also like to know when the pt first came in, (ie: this pt was admitted 12/22 s/p crani) and what the plan is for the pt (ie: once stabilized the pt should go to Mediplex for rehab). ONe big gripe I have is when we have a pt who has been on our floor for a while and I have never had them and I hear "I am sure you have had them so I will just give you updates". And also, I want to know valid history of the patient, if the pt is here for a spinal fusion but is a quad from 1 year ago, I kind of need to know, however sometimes it is neglected to be mentioned.
  11. by   mario_ragucci
    Originally posted by joyflnoyz
    "Contact isolation D/T MRSA/blood"
    What is D/T? I know what R/T is. Also, what exactly does contact isolation mean? No one is allowed in the room unless totally gowned and gloved and masked and footied and cap? Is there a nursing diagnosis to do with mrsa? See, I heard of isolation, and then there are precautions. I will look it up. Thank you for sparking my interest and it is good to know (no one cares)
  12. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    originally posted by mario_ragucci
    what is d/t? i know what r/t is. also, what exactly does contact isolation mean? no one is allowed in the room unless totally gowned and gloved and masked and footied and cap? is there a nursing diagnosis to do with mrsa? see, i heard of isolation, and then there are precautions. i will look it up. thank you for sparking my interest and it is good to know (no one cares)
    d/t means: due to.

    contact isolation just means that staff/visitors have to gown-up & wear gloves to preventing any physical contact with a patient with say something easily transferable like scabies, herpes, lice, mrsa, etc. masks & eye protection isn't necessary but in some cases, caps & footies are. hope this helps .

    cheers - moe.
  13. by   rebelwaclause
    Yes...Isolation precautions is VERY important information to know!

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