What do you think about people calling you "honey"? - page 6

I am in my forties, but a lot of people (such as waitresses, sales clerks, cashiers) call me "honey" and "sweetheart" all the time. I think this is fine, when the person is older than me, but I get... Read More

  1. by   Diahni
    Quote from stevielynn
    I have to admit I don't like being called "Dude!" :trout:


    steph
    Steph,

    Really! One of my daughter's friends said to me, Dude....didn't know whether to be shocked, or flattered that, I, too, was a "Dude"!!!

    R-E-S-P-E-C-T
    Find out what it means to me
    R-E-S-P-E-C-T
    Take care, TCB

    What happened to respect? Dunno!
    Diahni
  2. by   jamessheridanjr
    The term "honey" doesn't bother me. In the south, especially, it used as a term of endurment...not meant to be disrespectful.
  3. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from Diahni
    Steph,

    Really! One of my daughter's friends said to me, Dude....didn't know whether to be shocked, or flattered that, I, too, was a "Dude"!!!

    R-E-S-P-E-C-T
    Find out what it means to me
    R-E-S-P-E-C-T
    Take care, TCB

    What happened to respect? Dunno!
    Diahni

    Yep . . . .


    steph
  4. by   AmaurosisFugax
    As a pt. I had a nurse who called me & many other pts. sweetie or sweetheart. She was like 30-ish so I was at least 10 years older, most of the pts. were senior citizens. It didnt bother me at all, it was so obvious it was an expression of empathy. I got fabulous care & that's what mattered. However I would NEVER call a nurse by a personal term, I was the one receiving care so in that context her calling us sweetie was appropriate, a pt. (unless elderly) calling a nurse by an endearing term is disrespectful. Maybe that reflects the nurse's relative authoritative position but honestly I didnt analyze it that much.
    I can foresee a couple of situations where using honey or darling or sweetheart may lead to misunderstandings - those unfamiliar with the informality of American culture may find it improper (& it can go either way). I remember being quite surprised when I came to America that students call professors & employees call bosses by first name. And of course some clueless guy may think the nurse is coming on to him...but that's another discussion:spin:
  5. by   Nursing On The Run
    Boy, I haven't read all 67 posts on this thread! But I just wanted to say I worked with an EXCELLENT nurse when just starting out, and she often called people (nurses, patients, ancillary staff) "My dear." I much preferred that to any of the other terms meant to reassure an anxious patient (or show respect to other staff). I often used it myself.

    Just FWIW. More choices than just honey, darling, etc.
  6. by   macenna
    i guess it depends upon who calls it me, but alot of collegues i work with tend to use these words. i only tend to use it in work again if its to a patient feeling upset or needs some friendly words.
  7. by   labcat01
    I don't care who it is or how old they are....I hate it! I think it's condescending. When the floor nurses call me "honey" (because I'm a nursing student) what it means is "I don't care enough to remember your name"- I'd rather be called "Hey you"
  8. by   jamessheridanjr
    Although I do agree with the previous reply with using other terms, the term "darling" is sometimes used to make a person feel as if they're worthless...however, that depends on who's using it. Example, "I thought I walked you through this procedure yesterday, darling!"(as if the person is tired of dealing with you)
  9. by   muffie
    i could care less

    i could be called worse ...
  10. by   jamessheridanjr
    Labcat01, I totally agree with you. I've never looked at it that way, but you're right.
  11. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from KJB_65
    Geez. That's a little harsh. How does she feel about "yall" Yall is as much a part of my language as the word "the" so if I was her waitress and I walked up and said "Do yall need anything" and she didn't leave me a tip for that reason......well that's just wrong....yall.
    She is from Texas. She uses "ya'll" constantly."

    I've seen her actually go red in the face when someone says "you guys."
  12. by   Ms Kylee
    Love it! I guess I'm used to it because I've heard "Kylee honey" all of my life....
  13. by   dria
    seems to me to be a regional thing...
    i talk to people all around the country...it's rare that anyone north of the mason dixon line has called me "honey" but i've gotten a lot of "hon's" and "dears" from those parts...doesn't bug me much one way or the other...most of the people i speak with are older than me...guess im just used to it...

    personally, i address all my pts/members as mr/mrs/ms smith until they ask me otherwise....just the way i was raised (near chicago)

    one thing that threw me off was the (mostly) southern use of "miss andi" that always gets a grin out of me...round here its only used for the preschoolers (albeit rarely)

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